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Chief Pontiac of the Ottawa’s

Immediately after the peace of 1763 all the French forts in the west as far as Green Bay were garrisoned with English troops; and the Indians now began to realize, but too late, what they had long apprehended the selfish designs of both French and English threatening destruction, if not utter annihilation, to their entire race. These apprehensions brought upon the theatre of Indian warfare, at that period of time, the most remarkable Indian in the annals of history, Pontiac, the chief of the Ottawa’s and the principal sachem of the Algonquin Confederacy. He was not only distinguished for his noble and manly form, commanding address and proud demeanor, but also for his lofty courage, winning manners and a pointed and vigorous eloquence, which won the respect and confidence of all Indians, and made him a marked example of that grandeur and sublimity of character so often found among his so greatly miscomprehended race. Pontiac had closely watched the slowly advancing power of the English, and their haughty and defiant encroachments upon the territories of his own people and his entire race. When he was informed of the approach of Major Rogers with a company of English soldiers into his country, the indignation of the forest hero was roused to its highest pitch; and at once he sent a messenger to Rogers, who met him on the 7th of November, 1763, with a request to halt until Pontiac, the chief of the Nation, should arrive, then on his way. As soon as Pontiac came up he boldly demanded of Rogers his business and why he had come with his soldiers...

Early Exploration and Native Americans

De Soto and his band gave to the Choctaws at Moma Binah and the Chickasaws at Chikasahha their first lesson in the white man’s modus operandi to civilize and Christianize North American Indians; so has the same lesson been continued to be given to that unfortunate people by his white successors from that day to this, all over this continent, but which to them, was as the tones of an alarm-bell at midnight. And one hundred and twenty-three years have passed since our forefathers declared all men of every nationality to be free and equal on the soil of the North American continent then under their jurisdiction, except the Africans whom they held in slavery, and the Native Americans against whom they decreed absolute extermination because they could not also enslave them; to prove which, they at once began to hold out flattering-inducements to the so-called oppressed people of all climes under the sun, to come to free America and assist them to oppress and kill off the Native Americans and in partnership take their lands and country, as this was more in accordance with their lust of wealth and speedy self-aggrandizement than the imagined slow process of educating, civilizing and Christianizing them, a work too con descending, too humiliating; and to demonstrate that it has been a grand and glorious success, we now point with vaunting pride and haughty satisfaction to our broad and far extended landed possessions as indisputable evidence of our just claims to the resolution passed by our pilgrim ancestors, “We are the children of the Lord”; and to the little remnant of hapless, helpless and...

Menominee Indians

Menominee Indians were located on and near the Menominee River, Wisconsin, and in Michigan on or about the present location of Mackinac. The Menominee belonged to the Algonquian linguistic family and to the same section as the Cree and Foxes.

Biography of H. A. Hansen

H.A. HANSEN. – Among the enterprising and industrious agriculturists of Union county, mention should be made of the gentleman, whose name initiates this paragraph, since his energy and ability have been manifest to all and since he has distinguished himself by his faithfulness and success that he has attained in tilling the soil and in raising stock. He is also popular among his fellows for they have again and again manifested their confidence in him at the polls and have kept him in public office almost continuously for the last decade. The pleasant little Kingdom of Denmark has furnished many thrifty citizens for our country, but none more faithful and deserving than he, who was born there in 1842, the subject of this sketch. At the early age of fourteen years, Mr. Hansen started out for himself and soon was farming and until he was thirty years of age he continued at this industry. At the age last mentioned he left the native land and embarked for the United States, where he made his way to the vicinity of Green Bay, Wisconsin, and engaged there in saw mill work, for two and one-half years. After this period, he went to Kansas, locating in Wilson county, where he worked in a livery stable for five years and farmed for two years and then came to the Sound country in Washington and remained at Whatcom for one year. From there he migrated to the Grande Ronde country and in this valley he rented a farm which he worked for three years and then he took up a piece of land eight...

Goebel, John P. – Obituary

John Peter Goebel of Baldwin, Kansas, brother of Tony Goebel, of Enterprise, passed away in Lawrence, Kansas, March 11, 1957, and his body is being brought to Wallowa for burial. Recitation of Rosary was at 8:30 last evening, March 13, at Lawrence, and arrangements have been made by the Booth-Bollman funeral home for requiem mass to be offered by Father John Baumgartner at St. Margaret’s Catholic Church in Wallowa Monday, March 18, at 10 a.m. Burial will be in the Catholic section of the Wallowa cemetery. The deceased was born November 17, 1876, in Green Bay, Wisconsin, son of John and Margaret (Schaut) Goebel. For a number of years he lived in Wallowa County and operated the telephone office both in Joseph and Wallowa before going to Kansas. He was a retired farmer. Survivors include, three daughters: Mrs. Gene (Stella) Randel, Mrs. Jack (May) Randel, and Mrs. John (Ethel) Herrington, all of Baldwin Kansas; the brother, Tony Goebel, of Enterprise; two sisters; Mrs. Ralph (Catherine) Haun, of Lostine and Mrs. W. K. (Lena) Graves, of Portland; and five grandchildren. Contributed by: Phyllis...

Rich, Fred (Mary) Goebel Mrs. – Obituary

Mrs. Fred Rich, resident of Wallowa for the last 48 years, passed away Friday morning (May 29, 1936) following a lingering illness. While the end came somewhat suddenly, she had been in failing health for more than a year and her recovery had long been despaired of. Funeral services were held from the home Sunday afternoon at 3:30, with a large number of friends and relatives paying their final tribute and a mass of flowers testifying to their esteem. The services were conducted by Rev. C. N. Trout of Enterprise. Mrs. Rich’s maiden name was Mary Goebel. She was born May 18, 1884, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Goebel, in Humboldt, Brown County, Wisconsin and died May 29, 1936. When four years old her parents removed to Wallowa County, first settling in Middle Valley and a short time later moving to Bear Creek, near Wallowa, and it was here she was reared to young womanhood and married to Fred Rich, son of another pioneer family, June 24,1908. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Rich three children were born, the first child dying in infancy and the twins, Hilma and Wilma, now young ladies, together with their father, surviving. Other surviving relatives are her father, Peter Goebel of Wallowa, two sisters Mrs. M. E. (Christina) Waelty of Middle Valley, and Mrs. Cal (Maggie) Hetrick of Wallowa, and four brothers, Charles R. and William F. of Wallowa, Lawrence of Berkeley, Calif. and John K. of Wilder, Idaho. All were here for the funeral except Lawrence, and John was accompanied by his wife and four daughters. Others from out...

Hetrick, Anna Margaretta – Obituary

Anna Margaretta “Maggie” Hetrick, a resident of Wallowa County most of her life, died March 20, 1982, at Valley View Manor in La Grande, one week before her 100th birthday. Born in Green Bay, Wisconsin on March 27, 1882, she was the daughter of Peter and Gertrude Anna Huber Goebel and the oldest of 10 children. The family moved to Wallowa County from Humbolt County, Wisconsin, in 1888. On November 27, 1907, she was married to Calvin Hetrick in Wallowa, and she spent her adult life as a homemaker. Her husband died in 1938. During World War II Mrs. Hetrick served as a “Sky watcher”, a patrol to spot enemy aircraft. Mrs. Hetrick was a member of St. Pius X Catholic Church in Wallowa and of the Alter Society there. She was also a member of the American Legion Auxiliary, Kruse Post. Survivors include her daughter Mrs. Jack (Shirley) Mitts of Alamo, California; brothers Charles and William Goebel, both of Wallowa; a sister Christina Wealty of Enterprise, two grandchildren, two great grandchildren, nieces and nephews. A daughter, Cora Gilsenan, preceded her in death. Rosary was said Tuesday evening, March 23 at the Bollman Chapel. Mass of Christian Burial was offered the next day by the Rev. Leo Eckerle at St. Pius X Church. Organist for the service was Rita Haun. Pallbearers were Bud and Joe Haun, Leo and Ron Goebel, Fred Murphy and Bill Fisher. Honorary bearers were William and Charles Goebel. Interment was in the Wallowa Cemetery. Contributed by: Phyllis...

Goebel, Peter – Obituary

Peter Goebel Is Laid To Final Rest Thursday Mass was said Thursday morning in the Catholic church here for Peter Goebel, who died early Tuesday morning at his home here after a month’s illness. He was 94 years of age and while he had not fared from home much the last few years, he remained in good health and some daily activity up until his final illness. Peter Goebel was born August 6, 1857, at Humboldt, Wisconsin. He died at the home of his daughter on December 11, 1951, at the age of 94 years 4 months and 5 days. He was the son of Peter and Margarette Goebel and was married to Gertrude Huber May 3, 1881, at Humbolt, Wisconsin. Ten children were born to this union. They came as far as LaGrande in an emigrant train and from there on to Wallowa by team and wagon in 1888. The first few years he was in the sheep business in and around Wallowa. He spent 45 years on a ranch on Bear Creek and the last seven years in town with his daughter. Those who preceded him in death were his wife, three sons, Frank and Robert who died in infancy, Edwin, one daughter Mary Rich and one grandson Edwin Goebel. Those who survive are Margaret Hetrick, Christina Waelty, Bill Goebel, Charlie Goebel all of Wallowa; John Goebel of Caldwell, Idaho; Lawrence Goebel of Oakland, California, and 17 grandchildren and 14 great grand children. Also surviving are several nieces and nephews. Contributed by: Phyllis...

Bailey, Hattie Sadie Anderson – Obituary

Funeral services for Hattie Sadie Bailey, 2432 11th Street, 79, were conducted April 26, at the Beatty Chapel. The pastor Joe Jewell officiated with interment following in the family plot at Mt. Hope Cemetery. Mrs. Bailey passed away on Saturday, April 23rd at the Blue Mountain Nursing Home in Prairie City, Oregon after an extended illness. Mrs. Bailey was born on August 19th, 1886, at Green Bay, Wisconsin, the daughter of Hans and Olga Anderson. She came to Baker in 1909 and had lived here since that time with the exception of the past year which she had lived with her daughter near Bates. She was married to George E. Bailey in Baker on May 20, 1917. Mr. Bailey preceded her in death on February 22, 1965. She is survived by one daughter, Elizabeth Keller of Baker; one granddaughter, Ann Elizabeth Keller of Baker and one niece, Violet Irwin of Burke, Idaho. She was a member of Neighbors of Woodcraft Lodge of Baker, Oregon. Record-Courier, Baker City, Oregon, April 28, 1966 Contributed by: Shelli...

Sauk Tribe

Sauk Indians, Sac Indians, Sac Tribe ( Osā’kiwŭg, ‘people of the outlet,’ or, possibly, ‘people of the yellow earth,’ in contradistinction from the Muskwakiwuk, ‘Red Earth People’, a name of the Foxes). One of a number of Algonquian tribes whose earliest known habitat was embraced within the eastern peninsula of Michigan, the other tribes being the Potawatomi, the “Nation of the Fork,” and probably the famous Mascoutens and the Foxes. The present name of Saginaw Bay (Sāginā’we’, signifying ‘the country or place of the Sauk’) is apparently derived from the ethnic appellative Sauk. There is presumptive evidence that the Sauk, with the tribes mentioned above, were first known to Europeans under the general ethnic term “Gens de Feu” or that of “Asistagueronon,” the latter being the Huron translation of the specific name Potawatomi, both the terms in question being first recorded by Champlain and Sagard. In 1616 Champlain, while in what is now Ontario, learned from the Tionontati, or Tobacco Nation, that their kindred, the Neutral Nation, aided the Ottawa (Cheueux releuez) in waging war against the Gens de Feu, i. e. ‘People of the Fire,’ and that the Ottawa carried on a warfare against “another nation of savages who were called Asistagueronon, which is to say, ‘People of the Place of the Fire,”‘ who were distant from the Ottawa 10 days’ journey; and lastly, in more fully describing the country, manners, and customs of the Ottawa, he added, “In the first place, they wage war against another nation of savages who are called Asistagueronon, which is to say, ‘people of the fire,’ distant from them 10 days’ journey.”...
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