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Biography of Jacob Newton Butler, M.D.

Jacob Newton Butler, M.D., of Lempster, N.H., one of the best known physicians in this part of Sullivan County, was born in Lyndeboro, Hillsborough County, this State, February 6, 1821, son of Jacob and Sarah (Blanchard) Butler. His great-grandfather, William Butler, came, it is said, from England, and settled in Essex County, Massachusetts. He married, so we are informed, Sarah Perkins, and had seven children, three sons and four daughters. The three sons enlisted in the War for Independence, and one never came back. One was taken prisoner and carried to Halifax, N.S., where he died of small-pox. The other son, Jonathan Butler, grandfather of Jacob N., was born in Gloucester, Mass., and was the first of the family to settle in Lyndeboro. He served in the battle of Bunker Hill and in many other engagements during the War for Independence. While in the service he worked at his trade of a blacksmith nine months, and later followed his trade in connection with farming. He was Town Clerk for a great many years. He died in 1844, aged ninety-two years; and his wife, Lois Kidder Butler, died in 1846, aged eighty-six years. They were the parents of twelve children, as follows: Sarah, born January 11, 1779; Hannah, born October 27, 1780; Jacob, first, born December 30, 1782; Jonathan, born March 1, 1785; Lois, born April 27, 1787; Rachel, born July 4, 1789; Tryphena, born April 2, 1792; Jacob, second, born June 7, 1794; Mary, born September 4, 1796; Susannah, born September 23, 1798; Lucy, born January 21, 1802; and William, born April 21, 1805. William Butler, who became a...

Biographical Sketch of William Johnston

William Johnston, a Revolutionary soldier, came in from Hartwick, Otsego county, in 1807, and settled a half mile south of Bettsburgh, on the farm now occupied by Devillo Dutton. He took up 50 acres in Broome county, on the line of Afton, and bought about one and one-half acres in Afton, the title to which proved defective. He subsequently purchased it of Asa Stowel. He afterwards removed to the town of Sanford, in Broome county, where he died February 10, 1843, aged 91, and Deborah, his wife, April 14, 1843, aged 81. He had six children, only one of whom is now living, Levi, in Afton, aged...

Biography of Daniel S. Buck

Daniel S. Buck was a noted hunter. He took 300 acres of land for which he paid with the bounties received for the destruction of wild animals, $60 for each wolf and $75 for each panther, of the latter of which he killed eleven in one year. He made hunting his business while game lasted and some seasons made more than his neighbors did at lumbering. While in Afton we spent an evening very pleasantly with his genial son Noble, who is now well advanced in years, listening to the recital of his father’s adventures while on hunting expeditions; but two must suffice to illustrate his prowess. At one time, about 1811 or ’12, he, in company with Robert Church, followed a panther to its lair, which was in a ledge of rocks, about five miles south of the village of Afton, in the town of Sanford, in Broome county. The passageway to the den was about three feet high and two feet wide, and terminated at the distance of 24 feet in a cave about 20 by 30 feet and 11 feet high. His dog led the way into the den, and soon returned very weak from the loss of blood from a severe wound in the throat. Buck took from his neck a handkerchief and tied it around his dog’s throat, and having stationed Church at the entrance of the cave with an ax in hand to assail the panther if it followed him out, he proceeded into the den himself with his rifle. He threaded the narrow passageway on his hands and knees. At its terminus...

Biography of Capt. Hiram Smith

CAPT. HIRAM SMITH. – Capacity for business may make a man a miser or a shark. Generosity may make him a pauper. In the one case he may so use his talent as to over-reach and distress his neighbors; and in the other he may impoverish himself and become a burden rather than a benefit to society. The benevolent heart is best when joined to a sagacious head. No man seems so happy, and certainly none so useful, as he who is able to gratify his love of doing good by having the means for its accomplishment ever at hand. Such man was Father Wilbur. Such man also was Captain Smith. Oregon may well boast of both of them. Hiram Smith was born in Danville, New York, in 1810. That was about the time that many of the American princes were born; – when the American youth realized that the continent wa to be conquered from nature, as it had been in the last generation from tyranny. West of the Alleghanies a man might have about as much land as he could ride over. There was the opportunity to repeat the life which the world has most deeply cherished in its songs, and stories, – of making new homes, building new towns and constructing new states. the dross, the slag, of the old incrusted past was to be left behind, and the pure metal to be pushed to the western bounds. In the presence of such ideas, and embodying them largely himself, he went out to Cleveland, Ohio, where his life was made complete by his marriage to Miss...

Tuscarora Indians

Tuscarora Tribe, Tuscarora Confederacy: From their own name Skǎ-ru’-rěn, signifying according to Hewitt (in Hodge, 1910), “hemp gatherers,” and applied on account of the great use they made of Apocynum cannabinum. Also called: Ă-ko-t’ǎs’-kǎ-to’-rěn Mohawk name. Ani’-Skǎlǎ’lǐ, Cherokee name. Ă-t’ǎs-kǎ-lo’-lěn, Oneida name. Tewohomomy (or Keew-ahomomy), Saponi name. Tuscarora Connections. The Tuscarora belonged to the Iroquoian linguistic family. Tuscarora Location. On the Roanoke, Tar, Pamlico, and Neuse Rivers. (See also Pennsylvania and New York.) Tuscarora Subdivisions. The Tuscarora should be considered a confederacy with three tribes or a tribe with three subtribes as follows: Kǎ’tě’nu’ā’kā’, “People of the submerged pine tree”; Akawǎntca’kā’, meaning doubtful; and Skarū’rěn, “hemp gatherers,” i. e., the Tuscarora proper. Tuscarora Villages The following were in North Carolina, a more precise location not being possible except in the cases specified: Annaooka. Chunaneets. Cohunche. Conauhcare. Contahnah, near the mouth of Neuse River. Cotechney, on the opposite side of Neuse River from Fort Barnwell, about the mouth of Contentnea Creek. Coram. Corutra. Harooka. Harutawaqui. Kenta. Kentanuska. Naurheghne. Neoheroka, in Greene County. Nonawharitse. Nursoorooka. Oonossoora. Tasqui, a day’s journey from Cotechney on the way to Nottaway village. Tonarooka, on a branch of Neuse River between “Fort Narhantes” and Cotechney. Torhunte, on a northern affluent of Neuse River. Tosneoc. Ucouhnerunt, on Pamlico River, probably in the vicinity of Greenville, in Pitt County. Unanauhan. Later settlements in New York were these: Canasaraga, on Canaseraga Creek on the site of the present Sullivan. Ganatisgowa Ingaren. Junastriyo. Jutaneaga. Kanhats. Kaunehsuntahkeh. Nyuchirhaan, near Lewiston, Niagara County. Ohagi, on the west side of Genesee River a short distance below Cuylersviile, Livingston County. Oquaga, on the east...

Biography of Hon. John L. Underwood

Hon. John L. Underwood, postmaster at Montpelier, Idaho, successful businessman, prominent citizen, veteran of the civil war and influential Republican, is widely and favorably known throughout the state. He was born in Broome County, New York, January 15, 1832, of parents who traced their ancestry to good English families. Jonas Underwood, his grandfather, was a native of Fishkill, New York, and held a commission in the Revolutionary army. He died at Deposit, New York, in his eightieth year. His wife, who was of the New York family of Pine, survived him only a few days. Philip Underwood, son of Jonas and father of John L. Underwood, was born in Deposit, New York, in 1803, and married Angeline Peters. In 1855 he located, with his wife and family, near Polo, in Ogle County, Illinois, where he bought a farm and lived to attain the ripe old age of seventy-seven years. His wife died, at about the same age, a few years later. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which he “as a local preacher and evangelist. They had eight children, of whom seven are living. John L. Underwood, the second of the eight in order of birth, was educated in the public schools of the state of New York. In July 1861, he enlisted in Company H., Fourteenth Regiment Iowa Volunteer Infantry, to do his part in putting down the slaveholders’ rebellion, and was mustered into service November 6, following. He served in the command of General U. S. Grant and participated in the fighting at Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, Pittsburg Landing and intermediate points and in...

Biography of Thomas Blakeslee, M. D.

Thomas Blakeslee, M. D. Perhaps no present resident of the thriving little City of Neodesha, Kansas, could better describe its early days than Dr. Thomas Blakeslee, its pioneer physician, now retired from professional life. Just graduated from one of the country’s greatest medical schools, Doctor Blakeslee came to this growing village forty-six years ago, facing hardships, as all pioneers must, but enthusiastic in his love of his beneficent profession, and hopeful as to the scope and success of his conscientious service. For over a quarter of a century he ministered to the sick with the medical skill that knowledge gave him, and the sympathetic kindness which Nature had bestowed upon him, and then laid aside professional cares, shifting the burden to later comers in the field in which he was the first and most hard-pressed worker. In other directions public-spirited and useful, Doctor Blakeslee had also led a busy life, and he still continues one of the vitalizing elements of the community which he had borne his part in developing. Thomas Blakeslee was born in Broome County, New York, August 27, 1843. His parents were Nelson and Catherine (Partridge) (Boss) Blakeslee. The family is of Engish extraction and of New England colonization, the direct ancestors of Doctor Blakeslee removing, probably in the time of his grandfather, from Connecticut to New York. Nelson Blakeslee, his father, was born in 1813, in Broome County, New York, and from there, in 1847, removed to McHenry County, Illinois, where the rest of his life was passed following agricultural pursuits. He died at Woodstock, Illinois, in 1895, highly respected in his community as a...

Henry Todd of Killawog NY

Henry Todd7, (John6, John5, John4, John3, John2, Christopher1) born Jan. 13, 1793, died Oct. 26, 1862, married Dec. 14, 1814, Elizabeth, daughter of Jonathan Mills, who was a Revolutionary war soldier. She was born Dec. 10, 1798, died March 6, 1862. Mr. Todd served in the war of 1812, the length of service being unknown to the writer. After the war, the Government gave the soldiers either a pension or a farm and he took the farm which was located just outside of Killawog, Broome County, N. Y. So far as can be learned he passed the remaining years of his life in Killawog and probably on this same farm. In connection with the operation of his farm, he was a cattle dealer. He fell dead on the streets of New York City while there on a visit. Children: 1099. Eliza Canfield Todd, born Oct. 9, 1815, died Dec. 4, 1861, married Dec. 29, 1836, James Howland, who died Sept., 1879. Children: I. Mary Howland, d. young. II. Ransom Howland, d. young. III. James Henry Howland, resides in Sterling, Illinois. IV. Eliza Todd Howland, m. W. P. Utley; they live in Sterling, Illinois. 1100. John Todd, born May 18, 1817, died Dec. 6, 1844, married June, 1837, Lucy B. Gardner, who married second, Jesse Rogers, of Alden, Iowa. She died Oct. 24, 1865. John grew up on the family farm in Killawog, Broome County, N. Y. Children: I. Henry W. Todd, resides in Denver, Col. II. Chauncey D. Todd, resides in Somerville, N. J. 1101. Jonathan Mills Todd, born March 10, 1819, died March 28, 1885, married Oct. 5,...

Russell Todd of Lansing MI

Russell Todd7, (Chauncey6, Jonah5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1 born Jan. 5, 1830, died Feb. 25, 1907, married Sept. 10, 1875, Cora A. Brown. He was ordained to the deaconate by Bishop DeLancey in 1860 and to the priesthood the following year by the same bishop. His various charges have been: Morris (assistant) Westmoreland, Clark’s Mills, Augusta, Oriskany Falls and general missionary work in Chenango County, all in New York; Caro, Michigan; again in New York at Whitney’s Point; then in Missouri, at Lebanon and Marshfield, Cape Girarfeau and Canton. At the close of his labors at the latter place, his health had failed so much that he retired from the active ministry, returning to Lebanon to live. There he remained until 1904 when, with his family, he removed to Lansing, Michigan, where he died. Children: *1257. Agnes Goodrich, b. Dec. 19, 1876. 1258. Russell Hobart, b. Dec. 24, 1878, d. Jan. 9, 1893. *1259. Edward Robertson, b. Sept. 21, 1880. *1260. Mary Louise, b. March 31, 1884. 1261. Cora Whittingham, b. Jan. 10, 1887, m. Feb. 15, 1919, John Simeon Cleavinger. 1262. Virginia Anna McCoun, b. Feb. 10, 1892, d. July 21,...

Frank Hayden Todd of Binghamton NY

Frank Hayden Todd8, (Frederick H.7, Josiah6, Dan5, Christopher4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Feb. 26, 1866, died Oct., 1894, married June 15, 1887, Alice May, daughter of Abraham Perry and Frances Amelia (Childs) Minturn, who lived in Binghamton, N. Y. Children: *2076. Fred Hayden, b. June 26, 1888. 2077. Leonard Minturn, b. Jan. 3, 1890; in 1919, he was unmarried; lived in Binghamton, N. Y., where he worked and made a home for his mother and also her...
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