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Biography of Frederick Rose

Frederick Rose is in the grain business and handles his share of the grain that comes to Homer. He has been connected with the grain trade for the better part of his active career, and came to Champaign County about ten years ago, and his name and his enterprise are now known throughout that rich and splendid farming district surrounding Homer on all sides. Mr. Rose was born in New York City, November 3, 1861, a son of Henry and Anna (Smith) Rose. Both parents were natives of Germany and his father came to America in 1846. He had served an apprenticeship at the blacksmith’s trade in Germany and he worked at his trade in this country both in the East and West. In 1864 he located in LaSalle County, Illinois, and subsequently took up the business of farming. Both parents are now deceased. There were four children: Henry of Zion City, Illinois; Mary, wife of August Beck of Ford County, Illinois; George W. of Tulsa, Oklahoma; and Frederick. Frederick Rose grew up on his father’s farm in LaSalle County and received a common school education. At the age of twenty he left home and engaged in the merchandise business at Melvin, Illinois. Four years later he concentrated his attention upon the grain trade and from Illinois removed to Boswell, Indiana, where he bought and conducted an elevator for seven years. Following that he was in the grain business at Brookston, Indiana, for nine years, and in 1907 came to Homer and bought the old elevator of the town. He tore down this structure and replaced it with a...

Biography of Dr. William H. Ball

Among the noticeable fine orange groves of Riverside is that owned by the above named gentleman. His grove, of twenty acres in extent, is situated on the southeast corner of Cypress and Bandini avenues, about one and one-half miles south of the business centre of Riverside. Dr. Ball purchased the land in 1875, and the next spring commenced its improvement, first planting 800 seedling orange trees and the balance to deciduous fruits: the last named he has since replaced with citrus fruits. At this writing his orange grove comprises 1,150 seedlings and 800 budded trees of the Mediterranean Sweets, Washington Navel, Malta Blood, and Duroi varieties, besides his citrus fruits and grapes for family use: his fine groves show the care and attention of a thorough horticulturist, and his success is attested by the fact that his thirteen year-old trees, seedlings, in 1888 yield $300 per acre net. The other trees are of various ages and not in full bearing, but their proportionate yield is even larger than that above given. The Doctor took this land when in its comparatively wild state, and has just cause to be proud of the results of his year’s labor. Dr. Ball also owns twenty acres of land about three miles south of his home place, located in section 32, south of Jurupa Avenue. This land was purchased in 1890, and will in 1891 be planted with raisin grape vines, for which it is well adapted. Mr. Ball is a native of Henry County, Kentucky, and dates his birth in 1828. His father, William D. Ball, was a native of Virginia, and was...

Biography of A. D. S. Alkire

A. D. S. Alkire is the well-known and popular City Clerk and Assessor of Riverside, a position he ably fills with credit to himself and honor to that enterprising city. Mr. Alkire is a native of Pickaway County, Ohio, born at Mount Sterling in 1837. His father, William A. Alkire, was a native of Kentucky and a descendant of an old colonial family of Virginia. He was a carpenter by trade, but was engaged also in farming. Mr. Alkire’s mother, Hannah (Osborne) Alkire, was a native of Ohio, and died when the subject of this sketch was but four years old. He was reared in his native place, and his lot from early childhood was one of labor. At the age of eleven he really commenced life on his own account and depended upon his own exertions for support and schooling. It was a rough school for a boy, but he developed those manly traits of his character which have in after years secured his success in business pursuits and enabled him to wage the battle of life, gaining victories where his more favored competitors suffered defeat. Mr. Alkire’s first essay in supporting himself was in learning the shoemaker’s trade. A hard master forced him to abandon that, and he engaged in work for the farmers of his town until sixteen years old. He then learned the carpenter’s trade, and with his brother worked in Putnam County until 1880. In that year he located in Jasper County, Indiana. The war of the Rebellion in 1861 aroused his patriotic spirit, and he abandoned his occupations and consecrated himself to the...

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