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Biography of James R. Daniel

JAMES R. DANIEL. – The subject of this sketch was born in 1826, and has lived a life that might well be described in poetry as succinct as that in which Othello related his own. The son of a machinist and shipbuilder of Philadelphia, Mr. Daniel early learned naval craft on the schoolship North Carolina in New York harbor, and on the brig Washington of the Coast Survey, and was then transferred to the Independence and Potomac. After his honorable discharge from the United States navy, he made voyages as able seaman to Havre and Liverpool, and to the West Indies. In 1846 he joined the United States army to subdue Mexico, and was in the exciting scenes of that war until its close, being one of the number to witness the planting of the American colors on the old Aztec capitol. He was in the quartermaster’s department, and at one time had charge of a mule train, loaded with silver dollars, from Vera Cruz to the City of Mexico. He was engaged for a time after the war in business at that old city, and in 1850 came to the mines of California. With almost every passing year he encountered new romances and adventures. He was with the banished Mobile Guard of France, and served as scout to quell the Indians of the Stanislaus in California. In the month of July, 1852, he sailed for Australia, and on the way prospected the Samoan Islands of Tutuila. After mining in Australia, he came to Oregon, and on Althouse, and Klamath rivers mined with success. On Sucker creek he lost...

Biography of Richard Jeffs

RICHARD JEFFS. – The subject of this brief sketch was born in Westchester, Westchester county, New York, December 27, 1827, where he was brought up, working on his father’s farm until he was nineteen years of age. He then went to New York City, where he remained for eighteen months. In February, 1851, he started for California by way of Panama, arriving in San Francisco in March of that year. He started almost immediately for the mines, where he remained until 1858. During the great gold excitement of 1858-59, on the Frazer river, British Columbia, when thousands of people were rushing to the new El Dorado, Mr. Jeffs, with that spirit of adventure that has always characterized him, made his way to those then celebrated diggins, and remained there actively engaged in mining for about one year. In 1859 he removed to Whatcom, Washington Territory, where he went into the employ of Captain Henry Roder; and it was he who took to marked the first scow-load of lumber from that place. After working in different places until 1862, he purchased a farm of eight hundred acres on the White river, and followed faring until 1882. In that year the Hopgrowers Association was organized; and Mr. Jeffs was elected president of that association, and removed to Snoqualmie, Washington Territory, to manage their large ho ranch, perhaps the largest in the world, a view of which the reader will find in this work. Mr. Jeffs is one of the sterling business men of the day, noted for his sound judgment in business matters, and for his many sterling qualities of heart...

Biography of Col. Henry Landes

COL. HENRY LANDES. – The subject of this sketch is prominent and noteworthy, even among the foremost self-made men of the great and growing Pacific Northwest, – a section so progressive and promising that it has attracted the most vigorous minds and the ablest men throughout the country. He was born in a small town in Germany on the 8th of October, 1843. In 1847 his father and family emigrated to Kentucky, Henry being then four years old. There the boy grew almost to the years of manhood, and developed in a marked degree the spirit of adventurous ambition which led him on the 1st of October, 1861, to break away from the restraints of school and enlist in a Kentucky Federal regiment of infantry, being then but eighteen years old. In that regiment he served his country faithfully and well for over three years, covering nearly the whole period of the war of the Rebellion, and participating in all the principal battles from Shiloh to the capture of Atlanta. He was honorably mustered out of the service of the close of his term. The close of the war left him with his love for adventure intensified; and, like many another young man, he started out to seek fame and fortune single-handed, without prestige or assistance, but with a courage and industrious determination that amply equipped him to grapple with fortune. Naturally enough he turned his face towards the new El Dorado of the West. Arriving on the Pacific coast, he proceeded to the gold fields of British Columbia, then famous and alluring. There he delved laboriously but unsuccessfully...

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