Senijextee Indians

Senijextee Indians were located on both sides of the Columbia River from Kettle Falls to the Canadian boundary, the valley of Kettle River, Kootenay River from its mouth to the first falls, and the region of the Arrow Lakes, B. C. The Lake Indians on the American side were placed on Colville Reservation.



Semiahmoo Indians

Semiahmoo Indians were located about Semiahmoo Bay in northwest Washington and southwest British Columbia.



Biography of John M. Silcott

Almost forty years have passed since John M. Silcott took up his residence in Idaho, and he is therefore one of the oldest and most widely known pioneers of the state. He came in the spring of 1860 to establish the government Indian agency at Lapwai, and has since been identified with the growth and



Biography of Keith W. White

Keith Wood White, a retired farmer now residing in Grangeville, is a native of the far-off state of Connecticut, his birth having occurred in the town of Ashford, Windham County, on the 15th of May 1838. His ancestors came from old England and settled in New England at an early epoch in the history of



Tatlitkutchin Tribe

Tatlitkutchin Indians (‘Peel river people’). A Kutchin tribe, closely allied to the Tukkuthkutchin, living on the east band of Peel river, British Columbia, between lat. 66º and 67º.  For a part of the season they hunt on the mountains, uniting sometimes with parties of the Tukkuthkutchin.  They confine their hunting to the caribou, as they



Seechelt Tribe

Seechelt Indians, Seechelt First Nation, Seechelt People (Si-’ciatl). A Salish tribe on Jervis and Seecheltinlets, Nelson island, and the south part of Texada island, British Columbia. They speak a distinct dialect and are thought by Hill-Tout on physical grounds to be related to the Lillooet. Anciently there were 4 divisions or septs – Kunechin, Tsonai, Tuwanek, and



Lillooet Tribe

Lillooet Indians (‘wild onion’). One of the 4 principal Salish tribes in the interior of British Columbia, situated on Fraser River around the mouths of Cayoosh Creek and Bridge River, on Seton and Anderson Lakes, and southward from them to Harrison Lake. Pop. 978 in 1904. Bands: Anderson Lake Bridge River Cavoosh Creek (2) Douglas



Tsimshian Tribe

Tsimshian Indians, Tsimshian  People, Tsimshian First Nation (‘people of Skeena river’). The most important of the three main divisions of the Chimmesyan linguistic family, and that which gives it its name. In the strictest sense it designates the following closely related tribes or divisions living between Nass and Skeena rivers, north British Columbia: Kilutsai, Kinagingeeg,



Kitksan Tribe

Kitksan Indians, Kitksan People, Kitksan First Nation (‘people of Seena [Ksian] river’) One of the three dialectic divisions of the Chimmesyan stock, affiliated more closely with the Naska than with the Tsimshian proper.  The people speaking the dialect live along the upper waters of Skeena river, British Columbia.  Dorsey enumerates the following towns; Kauldaw, Kishgagass, Kishpiyeoux,



Bellabella Tribe

Bellabella Indians, Bellabella People, Bellabella First Nation (an Indian corruption of Milbank taken back into English). The popular mame of an important Kwakiutl tribe living on Milbank sound., British Cololumbia. Their septs or subtribes are Kokaitk Oetlitk Oealitk The following clans are given: Wikoktenok (Eagle) Koetenok (Raven) Halhaiktenole (Killerwhale) Pop. 330 in 1901. The language



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