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Chase Family of Fall River MA

CHASE (Fall River family). The Chase family here considered is strictly speaking a Massachusetts-Rhode Island one, springing as it does from the early Roxbury Yarmouth family, a later generation of which located in Portsmouth, R. I. In the third generation from the immigrant ancestor through Joseph Chase, who located in Swansea, Mass., and Benjamin, who settled in Portsmouth, R. I., have descended the Chases who have come from those respective localities. And both branches have shared largely in the commercial and industrial life of this section of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. From the Portsmouth branch came the late Borden Chase, who for years was a coal dealer in Fall River, and his son, the present Simeon Borden Chase, has long been one of the fore-most cotton manufacturers of that same city and as well a most active and influential citizen. There follows in chronological order from the immigrant settler, William Chase, the genealogy and family history of the Portsmouth-Fall River family just alluded to. William Chase, born about 1595, in England, with wife Mary and son William came to America in the ship with Governor Winthrop and his colony in 1630, settling first in Roxbury. He soon became a member of the church of which the Rev. John Eliot, the Apostle to the Indians, was pastor. On Oct. 19, 1630, he applied for freemanship and was admitted a freeman May 14, 1634. In 1637, or thereabout, he became one of the company who made a new settlement at Yarmouth, of which town lie was made constable in 1639. He resided at Yarmouth the rest of his life, dying in...

Osborn Family of Fall River Massachusetts

During the latter half of the century but recently closed and on into the present one, during the period of the great growth and development as an industrial center of Fall River, the name Osborn has stood out conspicuously in the business life of the city. Reference is made notably to the Osborn brothers — the late Hon. Weaver and James Munroe Osborn — for many years among the most prominent mill promoters and bankers of Fall River; and they have been followed by a generation now representative of the name and family, Mr. James E. Osborn, the son of James M., being now active and prominent in the same line of operation the father followed, is treasurer of the American Linen Company and Merchants’ Manufacturing Company and president of the Covel & Osborn Company, dealers in hardware and mill supplies. This Osborn family here treated is one of at least a century and three quarters’ standing in Rhode Island and the nearby part of Massachusetts. Still earlier than the beginning of the period just named there is a record of the family of Jeremiah and Mercy Osband at Bristol, now R. I., as early as 1684, the date of birth of their first child. Their children were: Robert Osband, born Aug. 11, 1684; Katherine Osband, born Nov. 12, 1686; John Osband, born Oct. 12, 1689; Jeremiah Osband, born July 25, 1693; Margaret Osband, born May 27, 1695; Sarah Osband, born May 11, 1701; Jeremiah Osband (2), born June 11, 1706. One Nathaniel Osband petitioned the General Court at its May session, held at Newport, 1682. So far as has...

Frances Adelaide Todd Treloar of Fall River MA

TRELOAR, Frances Adelaide Todd8, (Orrin K.7, William6, Simeon5, Joel4, Ithamar3, Michael2, Christopher1) married Charles Elmer, son of John Treloar, who is an independent manufacturer of hardware at Yalesville, where they reside. Mrs. Treloar spent all her years until 18 at school and had the special advantage of the State Normal at New Haven. She then spent a couple years in the home of her brother, the Rev. Wm. E. M. Todd, a former well known minister of New England, in Rhode Island and at Fall River, Mass. While at the latter place a large number of young people united with the church and among them she received the rite of Baptism and was admitted into the communion of Broadway–now Pilgrim–Congregational church of which her brother was then the installed pastor. Spending some three more years with her mother, she was then married at the home, her brother, then in the west, returning expressly to officiate at the wedding. Many people in all the walks of life, from Watertown, North Haven, Meriden and Wallingford were in attendance. Fannie, as she is called by her intimates, was always of a most amiable nature, winning the esteem and affection of a wide circle of those about her age in the three towns in which she had lived, Wallingford, Bristol, R. I. and Fall River, Mass., where she was a prime favorite with a lively group of literary and musical folk always attending her brother’s church in that city. At home she was known as earnest, humble and accomplished in all that makes home life attractive. Thus she has been able to create...

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