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Seabury Family of New Bedford, Massachusetts

SEABURY – variously spelled Sebury, Saberry, Saberrey and Sabury. The American ancestor of the Seaburys of New Bedford was (I) John Seabury, of Boston, who died before 1662. He married Grace, and had two sons – John (who went to Barbados) and Samuel (born Dec. 10, 1640) – and several daughters. (II) Samuel Seabury, son of John, born Dec. 10, 1640, died Aug. 5, 1681. He married at Weymouth Nov. 9, 1660, Patience Kemp, who died Oct. 29, 1676. He married (second) April 4, 1677, Martha Pabodie, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Alden) Pabodie and granddaughter of John and Priscilla (Mullins) Alden of the “Mayflower.” His children were: Elizabeth, born Sept. 16, 1661, who probably removed from the town, as in her mother’s will she was given a negro girl Jane and a cow “if she returns”; Sarah, born Aug. 18, 1663; Samuel, born April 20, 1666; Hannah, born July 7, 1668; John, born Nov. 7, 1670; Grace and Patience, twins, born March 1, 1673 (all born to the first marriage); Joseph, born June 8, 1678; Martha, born Sept. 23, 1679; John, who married Elizabeth Alden on Dec. 9, 1697 (to the second marriage). Samuel Seabury, the father, was a physician and removed to Duxbury, Mass. His will gives to his son Samuel his landed property in Duxbury; to son Joseph “those great silver buttons which I usually wear”; to son John “my birding piece and musket. I will that my negro servant Nimrod (valued at twenty-seven pounds) be disposed of either by hier or sale in order to bring up my children, especially the three youngest now born.”...

Lincoln Family of Hingham and Taunton, Massachusetts

From the pioneer days at the settlement at Hingham and Taunton the Lincoln family has been a continuous one in that region of Massachusetts; one of prominence in the start, it has maintained itself both here and in the country at large and in both has long since become numerous. It has been claimed by the late Hon. Solomon Lincoln that all the Lincolns in Massachusetts are descendants of the Lincolns who settled in Hingham in 1636 and 1638. He says: “We have evidence of authentic records that the early settlers of Hingham of the name of Lincoln were four, bearing the name of Thomas, distinguished from each other by their occupations, as miller, weaver, cooper and husbandman; Stephen (brother of the husbandman); Daniel, and Samuel (brother of the weaver).” He adds “our claim is that the early settlers of Hingham above enumerated were the progenitors of all the Lincolns of the country. From Hingham the Lincolns trace their early home to Norfolk County, England.”

Anthony Family of Bristol County Massachusetts

The Anthony family of Bristol County Massachusetts descend from one John Anthony of Hampstead England who travelled in the Hercules to New England and settled in Rhode Island in 1634. This family, under the entrepreneurship of Edmund Anthony, became prominent publishers of many early Massachusetts papers, some of which were prominent in the establishment of the Republican Party and it’s causes.

Osborn Family of Fall River Massachusetts

During the latter half of the century but recently closed and on into the present one, during the period of the great growth and development as an industrial center of Fall River, the name Osborn has stood out conspicuously in the business life of the city. Reference is made notably to the Osborn brothers — the late Hon. Weaver and James Munroe Osborn — for many years among the most prominent mill promoters and bankers of Fall River; and they have been followed by a generation now representative of the name and family, Mr. James E. Osborn, the son of James M., being now active and prominent in the same line of operation the father followed, is treasurer of the American Linen Company and Merchants’ Manufacturing Company and president of the Covel & Osborn Company, dealers in hardware and mill supplies. This Osborn family here treated is one of at least a century and three quarters’ standing in Rhode Island and the nearby part of Massachusetts. Still earlier than the beginning of the period just named there is a record of the family of Jeremiah and Mercy Osband at Bristol, now R. I., as early as 1684, the date of birth of their first child. Their children were: Robert Osband, born Aug. 11, 1684; Katherine Osband, born Nov. 12, 1686; John Osband, born Oct. 12, 1689; Jeremiah Osband, born July 25, 1693; Margaret Osband, born May 27, 1695; Sarah Osband, born May 11, 1701; Jeremiah Osband (2), born June 11, 1706. One Nathaniel Osband petitioned the General Court at its May session, held at Newport, 1682. So far as has...

Descendants of Captain Michael Pierce

The Pierce family is one of the ancient Colonial families of the Commonwealth, the forerunners of the name playing a conspicuous part as masters of vessels bringing hither emigrants from England. For several generations there has lived in New Bedford a branch of the old Rehoboth and Swansea Pierce family, descendants of Capt. Michael Pierce, who have been leading-spirits in the community — names especially conspicuous in the industrial life of the town and vicinity. Reference is made particularly to some of the descendants of the late Otis Norton Pierce, whose son, the late Hon. Andrew Granville Pierce, was for forty-two years treasurer of the Wamsutta Mills Company, an extensive and the most successful cotton industry of New Bedford, serving, too, for a time as its president, and who was officially connected with many other enterprises of New Bedford and elsewhere; and who, too, was hardly less prominent in the public affairs of the place, serving as the chief executive officer of the city and as a member of the city government; to another son, Otis Norton Pierce, Jr., who was long chief clerk of the Wamsutta Mills Company and of the New Bedford and Taunton Railroad Company, and has been officially identified with a number of corporations of New Bedford, being at present president of the Grinnell Manufacturing Company; to the sons of the first mentioned of these brothers, Andrew G., who are now actively carrying forward to even greater success the work of their father; to Charles M. Peirce, deceased, who was long in business in New Bedford, active and influential in municipal and legislative work; and...

Descendants of John Ames of West Bridgewater MA

The Ames surname is of early English origin, and the family living at Bristol bore the following coat of arms: Argent, on a bend cotised sable, three roses of the field. Motto: Fama Candida rosa dulcior. Crest: A white rose. (I) John Ames was buried at Bruton, Somersetshire, England, in 1560. (II) John Ames (2), son of John, died in 1583; married Margery Crome. Children: John Ames. Launcelot Ames. William Ames. (III) John Ames (3), son of John (2), born in 1560, died in 1629, married Cyprian Browne. Children: William Ames. John Ames, went to New England, settling first at Duxbury, where his name was on a list of those able to bear arms in 1643; removed to Bridgewater, and married Oct. 20, 1645, Elizabeth Heyward; died and left his estate to his brother’s heirs. (IV) William Ames, son of John (3), born in 1605, came to New England and settled in Braintree as early as 1638. He was admitted a freeman May 26, 1647. The Christian name of his wife was Hannah. After his death, which occurred Jan. 1, 1653-54, she married (second) April 6, 1660, John Heiden (Hayden). Children: Hannah Ames, born May 12, 1641; Rebecca Ames, born in October, 1642; Lydia Ames, born in 1645; John Ames, born March 24, 1647; Sarah Ames, born March 1, 1650; Deliverance Ames, born Feb. 6, 1653.” (V) John Ames (4), son of William, born March 24, 1647, married Sarah, daughter of John Willis. He settled in West Bridgewater, Mass., as early as 1672. He served in King Philip’s War. He died about 1726, when his estate was settled. Children:...

Descendants of Richard Borden of Fall River MA

The Borden family is an ancient one both here in New England and over the water in old England, as well as one of historic interest and distinction. The New England branch has directly or indirectly traced the lineage of the American ancestor, Richard Borden, many generations back in English history. His first English forbear went over to England from Bourdonnay, Normandy, as a soldier under William the Conqueror, and after the battle of Hastings — A.D. 1066 — was assigned lands in the County of Kent, where the family afterward became useful, wealthy and influential, the village where they resided being named Borden. One John Borden, of a later generation, early in the seventeenth century, moved to Wales, where his sons Richard and John were married. These sons returned to Borden, in England, and in May, 1635, embarked for America. (I) Richard Borden is found a settler in Portsmouth, R. I., in 1638, in which year he was admitted an inhabitant of the island of Aquidneck, and in that same year was allotted five acres of land. He figured in the surveying and platting of the lands thereabout in 1639, and in the year following was one of those appointed to lay out the lands in Portsmouth, R. I. He was assistant in 1653-54; general treasurer in 1654-55; commissioner in 1654-55-56-57; and was deputy in 1667 and 1670. He bought land in Providence in 1661, and not far from 1667 became one of the original purchasers of land in New Jersey from the Indians. He died May 25, 1671. Joan, his wife, died July 15, 1688. Their children...

Descendants of Peter Crapo

Through the greater part of the last century and up to the present writing, the name of Crapo has stood in and about New Bedford as a synonym for useful citizenship. Here have lived during that period Henry Howland Crapo and William W. Crapo, father and son, of whom a recent biographer says: “Among the many citizens of New Bedford and Dartmouth who have achieved high honor, and whose names are held in respect wherever they are known, are Henry H. Crapo and his son William W. Crapo. Born on a Dartmouth farm, from the sterile soil of which his parents could no more than wrest a livelihood, Henry H. Crapo showed his inborn attributes by closing his life in the highest office which the people of the State of Michigan could confer upon him.” And again, “The strong mental as well as physical resemblance of the son to the father is a striking; illustration of Galton’s doctrine of heredity,” this last having especial reference to William W. Crapo. The Crapo family with its allied connections is of original New England stock. (I) Peter Crapaud (Crapo), the progenitor of the family, was a young French lad cast ashore from a wreck off Cape Cod about 1680. His real name is unknown, but he was nicknamed “Crapaud,” the generic designation of a Frenchman. He was “put out” to Francis Combes, an inn-holder, of North Rochester, Mass. On May 31, 1701, he was married to Penelope White, daughter of Samuel White of Rochester, a son of Resolved White, who came to Plymouth in the “Mayflower” with his father, William White, in...

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