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Biography of John Evans Robertson

John Evans Robertson, a wellknown ice dealer of Concord, was born May 9, 1843, in Warner, N.H., son of Harrison D. and Sarah C. (Evans) Robertson, both of Warner. The families of both parents were old residents of Merrimack County, New Hampshire. The maternal ancestors originally came from Newburyport, Mass., where Grandfather Benjamin Evans officiated as Sheriff, being also a prominent business man. John E. Robertson attended the public schools of Warner, and subsequently fitted for college in the academy at Henniker, N.H. However, after leaving school at the age of eighteen, he did not go to college. In 1864 he went to Montreal, and there engaged in the produce business, under the firm name of Buck, Robertson & Co. Six years later, on account of ill health, he returned to Warner, where he conducted a country store until 1874, when he came to Concord. Here he was assistant cashier of the National Savings Bank for eight years. Beginning in 1882 he dealt in coal, wood, and ice until 1888, when he sold out on account of failing health. Three years later he resumed the ice business, which he still carries on. He is a trustee and the assistant treasurer of the National Savings Bank. When the institution went into liquidation in 1877, he was appointed assignee by the court. He is also a trustee of the Guarantee Savings Bank of Concord. In Bradford, N.H., August 15, 1864, Mr. Robertson was married to Martha F. Paige, of Montreal. Of their three children two are living, namely: Shirlie Louise, the wife of William A. Whitney, of Claremont, N.H.; and Carleton...

Biography of Edward Plummer Paige

Edward Plummer Paige, a former legislative Representative of the town of Dunbarton, was born in Bradford, N.H., in 1857, son of Bayard P. and Louisa S. Paige. The father of Edward Plummer, who was born in Dunbarton, subsequently removed to Hopkinton, N.H., where he acquired his education. At the age of fourteen years he returned to Dunbarton, and entered the general merchandise store of his brother Jeremiah as clerk. Three or four years later they moved the business to Bradford, where he continued to work for some time. He next engaged in stove-making, turning out some of the first stoves used in this part of New Hampshire. Later Mr. Paige went to Boston, Mass., where he was associated with the well-known firm, Leach & Gilmore, wholesale dealers in groceries. Messrs. Leach & Gilmore also owned and controlled a line of steamboats running between Boston and Bangor, which was a financially successful undertaking until William K. Vanderbilt put on a steamer in opposition. The cut rates for passengers and freight rendered the enterprise almost profitless, and they were glad to dispose of their interest to Mr. Vanderbilt. Mr. Paige also sold his interest in the grocery, after which he removed to Montreal, Canada, where for thirty years he was successfully engaged in the manufacture of all kinds of farming implements. He then returned to Dunbarton, and remained there during the rest of his life, dying at the age of eighty-four years. He and his wife had six children, all of whom they reared. Edward P. Paige acquired the most of his education in the Montreal schools. At the age of...

Biography of Stephen C. Pattee

Stephen C. Pattee, one of the most prominent, skilful, and prosperous agriculturists of Merrimack County, New Hampshire, lives in Warner, on a highly improved farm known as Maple Grange, which has been owned and occupied by his family for more than one hundred years. He was born on this ancestral homestead, January 11, 1828, son of Asa Pattee, and is of distinguished English and Colonial stock, tracing his descent from Sir William Pattee, who was physician to Cromwell and King Charles 2nd., and was knighted in 1660. Peter Pattee, son of Sir William, born in 1648 in Lansdown, England, emigrated to America when a young man of twenty-one years, settled first in Virginia, and a few years later removed to Haverhill, Mass. His grandson, Captain Asa Pattee, commanded a company in one of the Colonial wars, about the middle of the eighteenth century, and later received a Captain’s commission from Governor Mcshech Weare. He was the first of the family to settle in Warner, and built the first frame house in the village, it being now known as the Dr. Eaton house. Captain Asa’s son John, grandfather of Stephen C. Pattee, settled at Maple Grange in 1786, taking up the land when it was in its primeval wildness, and was afterward throughout his years of activity engaged in the pioneer labor of clearing and improving. He was an industrious, temperate man, and lived to the ripe old age of eighty-five years. He married Eunice Sargent, a native of Dover, N.H., and the daughter of Benjamin Sargent, who owned the adjoining farm. They had three sons: Asa; Jesse, who removed...

Biography of Daniel G. Peaslee

Daniel G. Peaslee, a farmer and lumberman of Bradford, residing about three miles west of the village, was born April 4, 1841, in Newbury, Merrimack County. His father, Jonathan Peaslee, a native of Newbury, was a son of Samuel Peaslee, one of the pioneers of the town. Further mention of the Peaslee family may be found in the biography of J. Albert Peaslee. Jonathan Peaslee, who was reared to farming, became a tiller of the soil from choice. When ready to settle in life, he bought a tract of land lying on the Bradford and Newbury line, and built his house near the present residence of Hollis L. Blood. He also built an upright saw-mill, in which he manufactured a large part of the timber cut from his land into lumber. Lumbering and farming formed his chief occupation until his demise at the age of seventy-six years. His first wife, Mary Gillingham Peaslee, a daughter of James and Betsey (Lane) Gillingham, and a sister of both Mrs. Jack Packard, of Concord, and Moody Gillingham, died at the age of forty-nine years. Of her children two died in infancy. The others were: Laurel G., of Newbury; Jefferson G., of Bradford; Joel, who died in infancy; Ellis A., now the wife of Isaac Sanborn, of Dunbarton; Marion, who died in childhood; Daniel G., the subject of this sketch; Alburton, who remained on the home farm, never married, and died in 1893; Fanny, the wife of Charles A. Bailey, of Belvoir, Kan.; and Webster, now deceased, who was a farmer in Newbury. Jonathan Peaslee married for his second wife Ablgail Putney, of...

Biography of J. Albert Peaslee

J. Albert Peaslee, an important factor of the agricultural and business community of Bradford, Merrimack County, was born in this town, on the farm that he still owns, December 14, 1845. His father, John Peaslee, a son of Samuel Peaslee, was a lifelong resident of Bradford. He was the Representative of an early settled family in New Hampshire, and one whose descendants are numerous in Hillsborough County, where, in the town of Pelham, they have an annual gathering. John Peaslee settled on the homestead farm now owned by his son, J. Albert, soon after attaining his majority, purchasing at first but ten acres. As time went on he bought other land, made valuable improvements; and at his death, which occurred in March, 1884, at the venerable age of fourscore and four years, he had one of the most valuable and attractive estates in the vicinity. He was twice married. His first wife was Chloe Maxfield, daughter of Richard Maxfield, who once owned the village of Bradford, then called Fishersfield. She died leaving two sons-Oliver, now of Bradford; and William, of Amherst, N.H. -and four daughters, namely: Margaret, wife of Stillman Parkhurst, of Bedford, N.H.; Minda, wife of B. B. Whiting, of Amherst; Hannah, wife of Timothy Morse, of Newbury, this county; and Sally, who died unmarried. He subsequently married Mrs. Betsey Presby Marshall, daughter of James Presby and granddaughter of Captain William Presby, the first settler in Bradford. Her first husband, Silas Marshall, left her a widow with several children, as follows: William P., of Boston; Ezekiel H., also of Boston; Kendall W., a former resident of Bradford, who...

Biographical Sketch of Captain Cummings Pierce

Captain Cummings Pierce was born in Hillsborough, N.H., May 22, 1803, a son of Nathan and Phebe (Cummings) Pierce. He was a first cousin of the late President Pierce. His parents removed from Hillsborough to Bradford in 1821, and bought the Pierce homestead, now occupied by Freeman H. Gillingham. Cummings Pierce succeeded to the ownership of the home farm, and continued the improvement of the land, clearing a large part of it, and soon after his marriage erected the present residence. He belonged for some years to an artillery company in the old State militia, serving as Captain the most of the time. He was strictly honorable and upright, Captain Pierce was no exception. He served in all the town offices, and for many years was Selectman. In 1860 and 1861 he served as a Representative in the State legislature. In 1833 Captain Pierce married Caroline Dowlin, who died April 14, 1874, leaving two children, namely: Lucetta, who married John H. Ewins, and died January 27, 1891; and Annie, who was the first wife of Freeman H. Gillingham, and died February 17, 1893. Captain Pierce survived his wife and both daughters, passing away November 13,...

Biography of Jesse W. S. Moon

Jesse W. S. Moon, a retired farmer, living in the village of Bradford, was born in Hopkinton, St. Lawrence County, N.Y., August 12, 1845. His parents, Jesse and Sophia (Barker) Moon, are well known in Bradford through their frequent visits to their son. Mr. Moon was reared on a farm, living with his parents until December 30, 1863, when he enlisted for service in the Civil War in the Eleventh New York Cavalry as a recruit, joining his regiment in Washington soon after. He served in the South, mostly in New Orleans. In the spring of 1864 he did guard on various plantations lying along the Mississippi, being for some months at Baton Rouge. He was honorably discharged May 16, 1865, at Memphis, Tenn. Returning to New York State, Mr. Moon was employed on the old homestead for a few years. In December, 1869, he went to Boston to work. While there he bought his present farm in Bradford, of which he took possession in July, 1874. His estate comprises two hundred and fifty acres of tillage and timber land and five hundred acres of pasture. He has carried on mixed farming, paying much attention to dairying, having a fine herd of thirty full-blooded Ayrshire cattle, which he considers the best milk producers. By remodelling and repairing the dwelling, and erecting new and commodious barns and out-buildings, he has made his farm one of the best appointed On January 10, 1867, at Burlington, Vt., Mr. Moon married Miss Susan F. Delano, who was born in Duxbury, Mass., daughter of Melzar P. and Susan F. (English) Delano. Her father, who...

Biography of John M. Fletcher

John M. Fletcher, a prominent and successful dentist of the city of Concord, N.H., was born in Canterbury, N.H., July 24, 1832. He is the son of John and Nancy (St. Clair) Fletcher. His grandfather, John Fletcher, Sr., was a native of Dunstable, Mass., born January 25, 1770. He removed to Loudon, N.H., and there spent his remaining years as an agriculturist, dying December 15, 1853. He was fortunate in choosing his partner for life, a lady of high moral worth as well as of great natural ability, a conscientious Christian, a devoted mother, and a loving wife. Her maiden name was Betsey Morrill; and she was born October 2, 1772, in Gilmanton, N.H., and died June 18, 1851. The result of this union was a family of fourteen children, consisting of eight sons and six daughters. Eleven of these he lived to see prosperous and happily located in business. John Fletcher, Jr., the father of the subject of our sketch, was born in Loudon, N.H., March 16, 1795, and chose as his occupation for a livelihood the tilling of the soil and the levelling of the forest. In the year 1822, March 26, he was united in marriage to Miss Nancy St. Clair, October 12, 1799, the youngest daughter of Noah St. Clair. They spent four years in Loudon and Concord, respectively, but finally, in 1826, purchased and located on the St. Clair homestead. From time to time he augmented his original purchase by buying additional land until his estate covered nearly two hundred acres. He was a man of high character, and universally respected and beloved by...

Biography of John E. French

John E. French, one of the leading men of affairs of Bradford, Merrimack County, was born in this town. February 27, 1843. He is a son of Daniel French, and the grandson of Offin French, an early settler of Bradford. Offin French was born in South Hampton, N.H., in 1761; and when but a boy he entered Paskey Pressy, one of the brave soldiers who enlisted from Warner; and after the war was over he came to Bradford, N.H., and, continuing the acquaintance formed on the battlefield, met, wooed, and won as his wife, Susannah, a daughter of Mr. Pressy. After marriage the young couple settled on a farm one-half mile east of Bradford Centre; and here were born and reared their children, thirteen in number. Offin French lived to the age of threescore years and ten; and his wife, who was born some years later than he, died within the remembrance of her grandson, John E., at the age of eighty-seven years. Daniel French came into possession of the old homestead, and cared for his parents in their declining years. He afterward settled on a place a third of a mile north-east of Bradford, where he farmed for twenty-eight years, removing then to the village, in which he lived until his death in 1867, aged threescore and ten years. His wife survived him, dying in 1876, aged seventy-six years. Her maiden name was Abigail Cressy. She was born in Bradford, and was a daughter of John Cressy, whose father was a soldier in the French and Indian War, and also in the Revolution, probably serving from Bradford. Daniel...

Biographical Sketch of Nathan R. Marshall

Nathan R. Marshall, the father of Mrs. Collins, was born in Hudson N.H., in 1792. He removed to Bible Hill when a boy of fourteen, and six years later married Abigail Hawks, daughter of Farrington and Sarah Knowlton Hawks. He was a man of education and an especially good accountant, as shown by his old account books, kept in a neat, clear hand. He held town offices at different periods, being a most intelligent and valued official. He and his wife reared ten children, three sons and seven daughters. Two of these died in infancy. Joshua P. Marshall, the eldest son, a man of good mental attainments, for more than forty years was a manufacturers’ agent for the sale of glassware. He always kept his residence in Bradford, but spent his winters during his later years in Florida, where he had large interests in orange groves. He died there in 1893, aged seventy-six years. Joseph Addison, another son of Nathan R. Marshall, was a farmer in his earlier life. Later he became the proprietor of a market in Boston, and subsequently, in company with his brother Joshua, established himself as a dealer in glassware. They were burned out in the big fire of 1872, but resumed business after a time, and continued in it until Joseph’s health failed. His home Boston, and he died at the age of fifty-nine. Farrington H. Marshall resides in Boston. He and Mrs. Collins are the only surviving members of the family. The Collins family are quite numerous, and hold frequent reunions in Amesbury,...

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