Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of Stephen Redden

Stephen Redden was born in Bracken County, Kentucky, April 14, 1818, and was a son of James Redden, who, leaving a large family of children growing up, resolved to give them a better chance by going west. Consequently he made a flat-boat, and, with his family and several of his neighbors and their families, he embarked on the Ohio river for what was then considered the far west. Stephen Redden was at that time four years old. At Louisville they would not trust the flat-boat to carry them over the falls, but were put ashore and either walked or were conveyed in some other manner to Portland, just below the falls, where the boat landed and took them on board. They landed at Evansville, Indiana, sometime in the fall of 1822, and after disposing of the flat-boat and investing in an ox team Mr. Redden and family started for the land of promise, the Prairie state, while the other families cast their lot with the Hoosier state. It was no uncommon thing for them to meet bands of blanketed Indians and see droves of (leer, or to be “lulled to sleep” at night by the “music of the wolves,” on their journey from the Ohio River to the small village of Terre Haute, Indiana, which at that time consisted of a tavern, a few saloons and stores, and a horse ferry to cross the Wabash River. They located on Big Creek, Edgar county, where they remained until 1830, when they removed to Coles county, now Douglas county. Here Stephen Redden grew to man-hood at the hard labor of making...

Biography of John A. Keck

John A. Keck was born in Baltimore, Maryland, October 27, 1843, but his parents, John and Elizabeth Keck, removed from his native city when he was but six months old, and settled in Bracken county, Kentucky. From there they removed, after a residence of about six years, coming to Missouri and settling upon a farm in Shelby county, where he was reared to manhood and received his education. His mother is still living, and is a descendant of the Tevis family, who founded Tevis college, of Kentucky. His father died in Gallatin in 1876. Our subject lived with his parents in Shelby county until 1862, when he enlisted in Company B, Missouri Cavalry Militia, and served one year. He received his honorable discharge at the expiration of the time mentioned on account of being disabled by a horse falling upon him, and from the results of which accident he is still a cripple. Returning to his home in Shelby county he engaged in teaching school in that and they adjoining counties of Lewis and Knox, following that profession until 1867. The year 1868 he spent in the southern part of the State, and in 1869 came to Gallatin; receiving the appointment of deputy county clerk, he served in that capacity until 1870, and was next engaged in the drug business one: year, then became deputy postmaster under Captain John Ballinger, and held that position for three years, or until 1875. After leaving the post-office he entered into partnership with Andrew Shriver, and carried on the-grocery business under the firm name of Shriver & Keck, for one year, when J....

Biography of E. T. Currens

E. T. Currens, farmer and fruit-grower; P. O. Mattoon; was born in Bracken Co., Ky., in 1816; his father was a farmer and tanner, and for fifty-five years conducted the two interests jointly, at Germantown, Ky.; E. T.’s early life was spent upon his father’s farm and in learning the tanning business; he entered Augusta College, Ky., in 1832, and graduated there from in 1836; he then engaged in mercantile life and farming till 1854, when he moved to Iowa and established the Kentucky settlement in Marshall Co.; in 1861, he returned to Maysville, Ky., and engaged in the hardware trade, in the firm of Currens & Owens; in 1864, he came to Mattoon, where he has since resided. Mr. Currens has thrice plighted himself at the nuptial altar; his first marriage occurred in 1839, his second in 1849, and his last in 1859, each time choosing for his helpmeet one of Kentucky’s fair daughters. His life has been one of marked activity; he has been an enterprising and liberal business man, and has always taken an active and leading part in introducing and rearing fine stock, in agricultural and horticultural exhibitions; he was the first merchant to build a tobacco warehouse outside of the river towns, and to buy, price and ship the farmers’ crops of Mason and Bracken Cos.; he founded the Union Agricultural Company of these counties, and gave his woodlands for their first exhibitions, in 1854-55; he was a member of the Board of Directors and Treasurer of the Company so long as he remained a citizen of the State; he was also a member...

Biography of J. W. Dora, M. D.

J. W. Dora, M. D., physician and surgeon, Mattoon; was born near Augusta, Bracken Co., Ky., May 5, 1827; he enjoyed the advantages of select schools, and attended Augusta College a short time before its suspension; in 1847, he went to Cincinnati, and became a student in Bartlett’s Commercial College, from which he graduated in the spring of 1848; he then devoted himself to book-keeping for the firm of J. O. Prather & Co., about a year; in the winter of 1849, he began the study of medicine, under Dr. George R. Todd, of Cynthiana, Ky., a brother of Mrs. A. Lincoln; during the winter of 1850 and 1851, he attended the Ohio Medical College, at Cincinnati, and the following spring, engaged in the practice of his profession, at Buena Vista, Ky.; the winter of 1851 and 1852, he was again a student in the College, and graduated in the spring following, when he again returned to his practice; in August, 1855, he came West to Illinois, and located in Mattoon; during the winter of 1855 and 1856, he attended a course of lectures in the Eclectic Medical College, at Cincinnati; returning home he remained here in the practice until October, 1863, when he moved to Chicago; during his residence of two years in Chicago, he received a degree from the Rush Medical College; in April, 1865, he returned to Mattoon, and has since resided here. He was married in the spring of 1850, to Martha E. Smith, a native of Harrison Co., Ky.; she died March 27, 1872; Nov. 10, 1875, he was married to S. A. McQuown,...

Bracken County, Kentucky Census Records

1790 Bracken County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Bracken County, Kentucky KYGenWeb 1790 Kentucky Census Substitute from Tax Lists Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Bracken County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Bracken County, Kentucky KYGenWeb 1810 Census Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Bracken County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Bracken County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1820 Bracken County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Bracken County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1830 Bracken County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Bracken County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1840 Bracken County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Bracken County, Kentucky KYGenWeb 1840 Census Military Pensioners Hosted at Census Guide 1840 U.S. Census Guide 1850 Bracken County, Kentucky Census Records Hosted at Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1850 Bracken County, Kentucky Census Images $ 1850 Bracken County, Kentucky Slave Schedule $ Hosted at Bracken County USGenWeb Archives Project 1850 Census Index Index A –...

Biography of Hon. James Abner Bennett

HON. JAMES ABNER BENNETT. – Our subject was born in Bracken county, Kentucky, on March 17,1808. His birthplace was a farm; and here he remained with his parents until 1830, when he moved to Boone county. He resided here for three years, and then removed to Jackson county, Missouri, near the town of Independence, and in 1839 again removed to Platt county. The following year, 1840, he was married to Miss Louisa E.R. Bane, of Weston, Missouri. Here Mr. Bennett remained, following blacksmithing and conducting a livery stable. He also acted as justice of the peace until the year 1842. There also was a son born to them, John R. Bennett. Mr. and Mrs. Bennett moved from here to Jackson county, Missouri, where they lived until 1850, in the meanwhile suffering the loss of their son, who died April 18,1848. In 1849 Mr. Bennett came on a prospecting tour to California. On his return, Mrs. Bennett made preparations and started with him for Oregon, traveling with ox-teams in company with some thirty other families, Judge Bennett being elected captain of the train. They started on May 9th, and after a wearisome journey of five months’ duration reached Oregon on October 2, 1850. They at once located on their beautiful farm near Corvallis; and, the settlers soon recognizing true worth, he was elected a senator in the territorial legislature from Benton county, and in 1857 was re-elected over all competitors. He also was once assessor of the county, and served as sheriff for one term. He occupied himself in farming and stock-raising, and drove cattle to California to the mines....

Biography of William Miller Kenton

William Miller Kenton first came to Kansas nearly forty years ago, acquired an interest in a homestead in Rice County, and by his subsequent exertions had developed a large amount of fine farming land and is one of the leading men of affairs and citizens at Chase. Mr. Kenton was born in Bracken County, Kentucky, October 4, 1850. His Kenton ancestry goes back to the earliest period of colonization of the Kentucky country and the name of Kenton is a famous one in old Kentucky, and doubtless there is some relationship between this branch and the noted Simon Kenton, one of the greatest scouts, frontiersmen and Indian fighters in American annals. The first American ancestor was Marcus Kenton, who came out of Oxford, England, and settled in old Virginia. This Marcus Kenton was early attracted to the Virginia possessions west of the Allegheny Mountains in what is now Kentucky, and his death occurred in Pennsylvania while he was en route from his Virginia home to the place known as Limestone, now Maysville, Kentucky. This Marcus Kenton married a member of the Cleveland family, and some of the later generations more or less jokingly referred to her as a connection of the President of the United States. Marcus Kenton, the immigrant, had a son who bore his name and who came into possession of 18,000 acres of land in Kentucky, lying south of Licking River and extending in the direction of Millersburg. This was acquired from the Federal Government in consideration for services rendered during the Revolution. This Marcus Kenton in his will remembered his brother Philip C. Kenton, giving...

Biography of George Wood Ebbert

GEORGE WOOD EBBERT. – A life of sixty years in and west of the Rocky Mountains, fifty of which have been passed in the Willamette valley, – this is the pioneer record of Mr. Ebbert. As such it is full of interest; and in its further character, as a career of exceptional activity and adventure, it is of thrilling fascination. Although now eighty years of age, somewhat bent and infirm, the fires of manhood still glow, and the mind is still active. He was born in Bracken county, Kentucky, in 1810. When a youth he was apprenticed at Louisville to learn the blacksmith trade. The last year of his time he deemed unnecessary, and was next heard of at St. Louis. At this town of Frenchmen and trappers he enlisted for the Rocky Mountains to serve in the company of Smith, Sublette and Meek, also a youth of nineteen. A year of service in the fir country finished the agreement; and, like the most of the other young men, Ebbert bought an equipment and began life as a free trapper. This continued two years, when Wyeth coming across the continent secured him as one of his company to occupy Fort Hall, which he had built. Life here was not a holiday. On a small stream sixty miles from the fort occurred one of the most desperate fights with the Blackfeet Indians ever had by anybody. Ebbert, Wilkins and three others had a camp on the head of the creek, trapping. It was in a sequestered spot supposed to be hidden from even the prying eyes of the Indians. But...

Biography of Arthur C. Shriver

Arthur C. Shriver, of the firm of A. C. Shriver & Sons, dealers in stoves, tinware and house-furnishing goods, Charleston; was born in Fleming Co., Ky., Jan. 30, 1813; when he was about 10 years old, his parents removed to Adams Co., Ohio; at the age of 18, he went to Hillsboro, in Highland Co., Ohio, to learn the tinner’s trade; after which, he worked as a journeyman in Ohio and Kentucky for a number of years; in 1836, he began business for himself in Augusta, Ky., removing a few years later to Felicity, Clermont Co., Ohio, and there carried on the stove and tinware business for nearly twenty years with the exception of a short time when he was in the same business in Cincinnati; in 1858, he removed to Charleston, and engaged in business, Dr. Byrd Monroe being his first Western partner; since then, many changes have occurred, but Mr. Shriver has remained the leader in his line of business during all the changes of the past twenty years; the firm now consists of himself and two sons -George A. Shriver and Charles W. Shriver; they do the largest business in their line of any house in the smaller towns of Illinois, carrying a well selected stock of stoves, tinware, queensware, glassware, silverware and cutlery; they keep everything of the kind that any one could want, are polite to their customers, and make it a point to sell lower than any one else. Mr. Shriver was married May 4, 1837, to Miss Nancy Maffett, who was born Jan. 17, 1815. We give the following sketch of their...

Biography of Rev. Augustus H. Tevis

The scholarly subject of this sketch is a native of Rush County, Indiana, born on his father’s farm, May 13, 1841, and was the ninth child of a family of three sons and seven daughters. His parents were Dr. Daniel H. and Phoebe (Scott) Tevis, the former having been a physician by profession,—a self-made man, who enjoyed a large and lucrative practice. He (Dr. Daniel H.) was born in Bracken county, Kentucky, and was quite a scholar as a linguist, being a proficient in both Latin and Greek. The elder Dr. Tevis died in 1858, and his wife in 1862, both of whom are buried in Rush county, Indiana. After his father’s death, the management of the extensive farming operations, embracing several large farms, left by him, all devolved on Augustus H., then but seventeen years old. In 1860 he entered Asbury University at Greencastle, Indiana, then under the control of Bishop Bowman. Early in the beginning of the civil troubles, however, young Tevis left college to volunteer like a true patriot and aid in suppressing the rebellion. He enlisted in September, 1861, and became second lieutenant of company H, thirty-seventh Indiana volunteers. He was in active service for over three years, participating in many hard battles, fights and skirmishes, including Stone river, New Hope Church, Resacca, before Atlanta, and numerous others. At Stone river, he was slightly wounded, and soon afterwards was promoted to a first lieutenancy. He was mustered out in November, 1864, and soon re-entered the same institution he had left to join the army. In the close of 1868 he was graduated therefrom, and, in...

Pin It on Pinterest