Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Barton Genealogy – Leicester MA

BARTON, CALEB, brother of Phineas, came originally from Oxford. He lived in the south-west part of the town, and is mentioned among the soldiers of the Revolution. He had Caleb, jun. David. Charles, b. in 1795; now living in Leicester. Otis, who lives in Oakham. And Brigham N., now in business in Philadelphia. His daughters were Rebecca, who m. Knight Sprague, jun. Sally, m. J. Gilbert. Patty, m. Philip Earle. Roxa, m. Charles King; and d. 1843, aged fifty-three. Mehitabel, m. a Hixon of Medway. Hulddah, m. a Clark of Medway. Harriet, m. a Prentiss of Auburn. Adeline, m. a Blake of Hopkinton. Mr. Barton had two wives: first, Polly, dau. of Samuel Upham; and, second, Betsey Lamb. BARTON, JOSHUA, came from Oxford in 1720. He had Timothy, b. April 13, 1732; Nathan, b. July 23, 1734; Reuben, b. March 28, 1738. He removed to Spencer in 1737. His wife’s name was Anna. BARTON, PHINEHAS, m. Elizabeth, dau. of John Hasey, 1772. They had Betsey, b. Sept. 3, 1776; m. Alexander Westley. Elijah, b. Oct. 25, 1778; m. Hannah, dau. of Luther Ward, 1810; was an ingenious mechanic; removed from Leicester, before 1817, to Connecticut, where he now lives. Samuel, b. Dec. 24, 1782. Phinehas, b. May 12, 1785. Phinehas, 2d, b. Oct. 27, 1795; lives in the city of New York. Horace, b. Dec. 17, 1799. Mr. Barton was a laboring man, and lived in various places in Leicester. Edward, a son of Betsey, is a well-known gentleman of business in New York; and is one of the proprietors of the “New-York Times,” which he helped to...

Biography of Raymond C. Harris

RAYMOND C. HARRIS – The homely qualities of loyalty to one’s employers, and steady, even-minded performance of duties year in and year out, a keen desire to be of service and useful in the position assigned them by birth and circumstances with no after thought but a cheerful and confident prospect into the future, these very simple yet not all too frequent traits of character which have sped on many good men slowly but surely-like the sailing vessel drives before the calm trade winds-to the desired goal, have also helped Raymond C. Harris, president of the Textile Roll and Supply Company, to attain his present position. Mr. Harris is a native of Lawrence, Massachusetts, born November 24, 1884, a son of William O. Harris, treasurer of the Rodney Hunt Manufacturing Company, and of Elizabeth (Genmell) Harris, who died March 30, 1924, at the age of ninety-seven years. Mr. Harris came to Orange in March, 1906, from Malden, Massachusetts, and received his education in the schools of Malden and Boston. After completing his studies he entered the employ of the Rodney Hunt Manufacturing Company, of which his father was, treasurer. Gradually he rose to the position of secretary of that concern and continued with them for seventeen years, having in addition charge of the Boston office. In May, 1919, Mr. Harris established the Textile Roll and Supply Company at Orange, of which he is now president. This firm manufactures all machinery used in the textile trade. In politics Mr. Harris is an independent, but he really keeps aloof from anything connected with it; in religion he is a member of...

Pin It on Pinterest