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Descendants of Charles Keith of Bridgewater, Massachusetts

For the ancestry of Charles Keith, please see Descendants of Rev. James Keith of Bridgewater, Massachusetts (VI) Charles Keith, son of Benjamin, was born Aug. 8, 1794, and married Dec. 8, 1817, Mehitable Perkins, born March 23, 1795, daughter of Josiah and Anna (Reynolds) Perkins, of North Bridgewater, both of whom were descendants of historic old New England families. To this union were born children as follows: Damaris Williams, born Oct. 8, 1818, married Vinal Lyon, of North Bridgewater, where she died; Charles Perkins, born June 20, 1820, is mentioned below; Anna Reynolds, born Nov. 11, 1822, married Theodore Lilley, of North Bridgewater, and died Jan. 28, 1882; Rhoda Perkins, born Oct. 28, 1830, married Barnabas H. Gray, of Kingston, Mass.; Sanford, born Nov. 25, 1833, died in Boston, though he lived at Louisville, Ky., where he was engaged in the shoe business, and where he married Maggie J. Harvey. Charles Keith, the father, died July 29, 1859, and the mother passed away April 22, 1863. Naturally of a “bookish” turn of mind, outdoor occupations had little attraction for Mr. Keith, and in the gratification of his tastes and inclinations farming pursuits were neglected for the less severe physical occupation of the shop. In his younger days he was evidently quite an athlete, for it is related that at the “raising” of Sprague’s Mill, Factory Village, a wrestling match was planned for the occasion, and that he was pitted against several, all of whom he overcame, when, as a last resort, Lieut. Israel Packard was brought forward to contend for the honors; after a protracted struggle he, too, was...

Seabury Family of New Bedford, Massachusetts

SEABURY – variously spelled Sebury, Saberry, Saberrey and Sabury. The American ancestor of the Seaburys of New Bedford was (I) John Seabury, of Boston, who died before 1662. He married Grace, and had two sons – John (who went to Barbados) and Samuel (born Dec. 10, 1640) – and several daughters. (II) Samuel Seabury, son of John, born Dec. 10, 1640, died Aug. 5, 1681. He married at Weymouth Nov. 9, 1660, Patience Kemp, who died Oct. 29, 1676. He married (second) April 4, 1677, Martha Pabodie, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Alden) Pabodie and granddaughter of John and Priscilla (Mullins) Alden of the “Mayflower.” His children were: Elizabeth, born Sept. 16, 1661, who probably removed from the town, as in her mother’s will she was given a negro girl Jane and a cow “if she returns”; Sarah, born Aug. 18, 1663; Samuel, born April 20, 1666; Hannah, born July 7, 1668; John, born Nov. 7, 1670; Grace and Patience, twins, born March 1, 1673 (all born to the first marriage); Joseph, born June 8, 1678; Martha, born Sept. 23, 1679; John, who married Elizabeth Alden on Dec. 9, 1697 (to the second marriage). Samuel Seabury, the father, was a physician and removed to Duxbury, Mass. His will gives to his son Samuel his landed property in Duxbury; to son Joseph “those great silver buttons which I usually wear”; to son John “my birding piece and musket. I will that my negro servant Nimrod (valued at twenty-seven pounds) be disposed of either by hier or sale in order to bring up my children, especially the three youngest now born.”...

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Chandler Family of Boston and East Bridgewater MA

This Boston – East Bridgewater Chandler family, the head of which was the late Hon. Peleg Whitman Chandler, long one of the leading counselors of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and one of a family of lawyers, comes of a Massachusetts-Maine branch of the ancient Duxbury family whose progenitor was Edmund Chandler. The branch just alluded to for several generations at New Gloucester and Bangor, Maine, and at Boston in this Commonwealth, has been one of liberal education, college-bred men, men who have adorned the legal profession, and it has allied itself through generations with a number of the ancient and first families of the Old Colony. There follows in chronological order from Edmund Chandler, the first American ancestor of this branch of American Chandlers, and in detail the family history and genealogy.

Early New England People

Sarah Titcomb over her years of study of various New England families had collected quite a bit of material of several early New England families. At the bequest of some of her friends, she prepared and published them in book form. When reading through the material I was impressed with the amount of material collected on each individual, and rather then a brief genealogical sketch, readers are provided an in-depth study of each early family: Ayer, Bartlett, Bradley, Chase, Dean, Dow, Dunster, Ellis, Fuller, Hope, Kilby, Martine, Les Dernier, Maverick, Mills, Montague, Pemberton, Pepperrell, Poore, Precott, Sewall, Longfellow, Spofford, Titcomb, Watmough, and Willard.

Bean and Bane Family Genealogy of Saco Valley Maine

Tradition makes the ancestor of this family who first came to our shores a native of the Isle of Jersey, but I doubt the truth of the statement. I have not found the name, or one resembling it, in any record or book relating to Jersey. The surname Bain, and Bane, are derived from the Gaelic word bane which signified white or fair complexion, as Donald Bane, who usurped the Scottish throne after the death of his brother, Malcolm Canmore. An ancient branch of the family in Fifeshire, Scotland, have spelled the surname Bayne. The Highland MacBanes were a branch of the Macintosh clan, and their distinctive badge was the red whortleberry. Maj. Gillies MacBane, chief of the clan in 1745, was a man of giant stature, being six feet four and a half inches in height. He brought a hundred MacBanes into the field, and at the battle of Culloden, being beset by a squad of government troops, he placed his back against a wall, and, though wounded in several places, fought with such desperation that he laid thirteen of his assailants dead at his feet. An officer called to “save that brave man,” but they cut him down. His widow is said to have composed the pathetic lament in Gaelic, entitled mo run geal oig, or. The following lines were found in a work called “The Gael”: “With thy back to the wall, and thy breast to the targe, Full Hashed thy claymore in the face of their charge, The blood of the boldest that barren turf stain. But alas! thine is reddest there, Gillies MacBane! Hewn...

Lovering Family Genealogy of Taunton Massachusetts

Through much of the nineteenth century there figured prominently in the business and social life of Taunton — continuing to do so at the present — the family bearing the name introducing this sketch. Reference is made to the late Hon. Willard Lovering, long one of the leading manufacturers not only of Taunton, but of the great manufacturing region thereabout, in both Massachusetts and Rhode Island, a representative in the Massachusetts Assembly, bank president, etc.; and to his sons and grandsons, the former being the late Charles L., the late Hon. William C. and Hon. Henry Morton Lovering, all of whom are or have been officers in the Whittenton Manufacturing Company and among the leading business men and citizens of their city, William C. having been the representative in the United States Congress from the 12th and 14th Massachusetts districts. The home town of this Taunton Lovering family for generations was Holliston, where the name was well represented in the struggle of the colonies for independence, and from which town and vicinity went out into other localities men of achievement. It was from this Holliston stock sprang the eminent lawyer, Hon. Warren Lovering, of Medway, born Feb. 21, 1797, who was often a member of the State Assembly, a member of the executive council for some years in the thirties, at the time being in warm personal relations with the then governor of Massachusetts, the Hon. Edward Everett, Bank Commissioner, etc.; and his brother, the late Hon. Amos Lovering, lawyer and judge, who figured prominently in the South and West. These were the sons of Amos and Lucy (Day)...

Atkinson Family Genealogy of Saco Valley

The Atkinsons were English, and the ancestors of the New England families came from Bury, in County Lancaster, in 1634. Theodore Atkinson, the emigrant, settled in Boston and was owner of a good estate there. Atkinson street, where he had land, was named for him, and Berry street, for the place of his nativity. Hon. Theodore Atkinson, a grandson, settled on Great island, in Portsmouth harbor, and engaged in trade and fishing. He was appointed clerk of the Superior Court of Judicature for the province; was a man of great fidelity, held in high esteem. John Atkinson, son of the first Theodore, b. in Boston in 1636, m. Sarah Myrick, Apr. 27, 1664, and lived on the side of the “Upper Green,” in Newburyport, Mass. His son, John Atkinson, m. Sarah Woodman, in 1693, and had Thomas, b. Mar. 16, 1694, who m. Mary Pike, of Salisbury, Aug. 5, 17 19. He was the father of: Humphrey Atkinson, b. June 12, 1720; m. Sarah Hale, of Newburyport, May 25, 1743, and lived in that town until 1760, when he came to Buxton. He had purchased land in the township previously; was a shipwright. He d. in 1775, and with his wife was buried at Pleasant Point. Children named as follows, being born in Newbury: Sarah Atkinson, b. June 25, 1744; m. Jabez Bradbury. Joseph Atkinson, b. Aug. 24, 1745; m. Olive, dau. of Capt. Joseph Woodman, Dec. 18, 1767, and in 1769 his father conveyed to him forty acres of land, upon which he settled and died. He was deacon of the Baptist church. He and his brother m....

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