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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Richard Lafayette Smith

(See Grant and Ward) Richard Lafayette, son of Frederick David and Charlotte Elizabeth (Fields) Smith, born September 7, 1899, educated at Big Cabin. Married at Big Cabin May 31, 1919, Minnie Carrie, daughter of Robert Louis and Caroline Emma (Schmidt) Steigleder, born March 11, 1900, in Booneville, Missouri. They are the parents of Louis Richard Smith, born March 2, 1920 and Milton Eldo Smith born Nov. 5, 1921. Mr. Smith is a farmer and breeder of Purebreed Hereford cattle and is a member of the I. O. O. F. Fraternity. Mr. Steigleder was born July 10, 1862, in Iowa. Mrs. Steigleder was born in Missouri April 2, 1871 and they were married in Booneville, Missouri, September 9,...

Biography of William Middleton Givens

William Middleton Givens, son of John S. and Margaret S. Givens, was born near Booneville, Cooper county, Missouri, December 23, 1827. He was reared upon a farm amid the wholesome influences of country life and industry, and educated in the early private schools of his native county, supplemented by an attendance at F. T. Kemper’s High School, of Booneville. At the the age of seventeen he began teaching school, and continued to follow this profession at intervals until he graduated as a physician. In January, 1854, he entered upon the study of medicine under Dr. H. C. Gibson, of Booneville, remaining under his preceptorship three years, and attending two full courses of lectures at the St. Louis Medical College, passing the regular examination before the faculty, and graduating a Doctor of Medicine, in March, 1857. Immediately thereafter he removed to Daviess county and on the 14th of the following July, was united in marriage to Miss Ada B. Canthorn. They settled in Gallatin, and Dr. Givens entered upon the practice of medicine, which he has continued almost uninterruptedly ever since. He remained in Gallatin all during the War of the Rebellion, experiencing all the vicissitudes of those troublous times, and although his sympathies were with the South -being by birth and education a Southerner-he remained to a great extent neutral, not wishing to see the Government disrupted, and so tendered his services freely, ministering to the sick and wounded of both Federal and Confederate armies, as they came within hi$ reach. He was not arrested or disturbed, but continued his practice all during the war, and now has not...

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