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Bingham County

While not one of the most populous nor one of the most wealthy counties in the state, Bingham county does not by any means stand at the foot of the list. In 1891 the Idaho Register, published at Idaho Falls, in giving a description of Bingham County, stated that it was the largest county in the state. Its length was one hundred and seventy-six miles, its width ninety miles, and it contained about fourteen thousand square miles, or about eight million acres of land; it extended from the Montana line on the north to within about twenty-one miles of the Utah line on the south. By an act approved March 6, 1893, a strip of about fifty-six miles was taken from the south end of the county and a new county formed, called Bannock county, and by an act approved March 4, at the same session of the legislature, a strip of about seventy-five miles was taken from the north end, forming a new county, called Fremont. This left Bingham county about ninety miles east and west and about forty-five miles north and south. The central portion of the county is traversed by the Snake River, and what is known as the great Snake River valley composes a large part of the central portion of the county. It is a very fertile section of country. The most extensive yield of wheat, oats, hay and potatoes is here shown. Many fields of wheat average fifty bushels to the acre, machine measure, which would usually hold out to nearly fifty-five bushels by weight, as nearly all the wheat runs sixty-two to...

Biography of Carlyle L. Pelot

It is worthy of note that a majority of the pioneers of Idaho Falls were young, or comparatively young, men. They did not come to mold a new community in accordance with antiquated precedents which had been worn out elsewhere. They came open-eyed, susceptible to conviction, ready to take conditions as they existed and shape them according to the logic of the time and the place. How they succeeded, every one knows who knows anything of the history of the town. One of the most far-sighted of these pioneers was the man whose name appears above; and it is the purpose of the writer to give a brief account of his antecedents, his life and his successes to the present time. Carlyle L. Pelot descended from French ancestry. His grandparents in the paternal line came to America at an early day and located at Savannah, Georgia. There Frank L. Pelot, father of Carlyle, our subject, was born. He married Miss Bettie Carlyle, a native of Kentucky. In 1856 they removed to Missouri and settled near Blackburn, in Salem County, where Mr. Pelot became a successful farmer. He is yet living, aged seventy. His wife died in her sixtieth year. Their son, Carlyle L., was born in Woodford County, Kentucky, May 18, 1854. He was two years old when his parents located in Missouri, and there he was educated in the public schools and brought up to the life of a farmer and stockbreeder, and also was taught all the arts of horse-taming, etc. Twenty years ago a change of climate was prescribed for him, and he sought a broader...

Biography of Clarence W. Brooks

A little thoughtful consideration of the career of Clarence W. Brooks, proprietor of the Brooks House, Idaho Falls, brings one to the conclusion that he has in most of his business operations been impelled by the spirit of the pioneer. He has sought out new plans and new conditions likely to favor his projects, and after he has made them available and profitable, he has sought out still others, and after those others. The wisdom of his selection has been proven by the success which has crowned his efforts. Not only is he one of the boldest, most venturesome and most successful hotel men in the west, but he is one of the best all-round hotel men “to the manner born” and experienced in the best houses in the country, with a comprehensive grasp on the hotel business, as such, and an intimate knowledge of all the details of good hotel-keeping. Clarence W. Brooks was born in Royalton, Vermont, June 22, 1848. His ancestors came from England and settled early in New Hampshire. His paternal grandfather was a Revolutionary soldier, and lived for some years after American independence, for which he had fought, was an established fact. Austin Brooks, his son and the father of Clarence W. Brooks, was born in Vermont, and there married Miss Susan Smith, and they lived and were farmers at Royalton for fifty years, until his death, in July, 1880, at the age of eighty-one years. His widow lives at their old home and is now (1899) seventy-eight years old, still active in her interest in the Congregational church, of which her husband also...

Biography of Benjamin A. Jenne

Character and ability will come to the front anywhere. As boy and man, many a man has been buffeted by fortune and had almost insurmountable obstacles thrust in his path, but per-severance has cleared them away and he has gone on to success. Such has been the experience of the subject of this sketch, one of the rising and popular citizens and public men of Bingham County, Idaho, a man with a heart for any venture, and a smile for friend and foe. Benjamin P. Jenne, deputy sheriff and jailer of Bingham County, Idaho, was born at Poor Man’s Gulch, California, October 22, 1855, and is descended from English and French ancestry. His grandfather, Benjamin P. Jenne, was born in France, whence he emigrated to the United States and settled in St. Lawrence County, New York. There his son Benjamin P. Jenne, 2d, was born and reared. He went, while yet a young man, to California, and there married Miss Annie Ann Richardson, who died in giving birth to her only child, the subject of this sketch. Benjamin P. Jenne, 2d, died, aged eighty-seven, in 1894. When he was four years old, Benjamin A. Jenne was taken to Ohio to live with his uncle, Ansel Jenne, and remained there, attending school after he was old enough, until he was twelve. He then went back to St. Lawrence County, New York, where he had a home with relatives, and at fifteen began to earn his own living. For two years he was a sailor on the great lakes between Ogdensburg, New York, and Chicago, Illinois. Then he went into the...

Biography of James Bishop Thomas

“Faith without works” has never accomplished much. Religion that is practical and applicable to the everyday life of any people is good for them, regardless of any peculiarities of creed. Bishop Thomas, of the Eagle Rock ward of the Church of Latter Day Saints, must be recommended as a man of the highest quality of business ability, one who makes a business of religion and does not attempt to do business except by the rule which is the rule of his private life. Bishop Thomas is a native of Wales and a son of John and Mary (Roberts) Thomas. He was born at Llanelly, Carmarthenshire, April 29, 1848. His parents were converted to the faith of the Church of Latter Day Saints that same year. His father, who was a tailor, came with his wife and seven of their sons to America, twenty years later, and settled at Salt Lake City, Utah. There he devoted himself to his trade until his retirement from the active life. He is living at Smithfield, Utah, aged eighty-four years. His wife died in 1885 aged sixty-five. John, Thomas, William, James, Lorenzo, Dan and George, their seven sons who came with them to the United States, all settled in Utah and were ardent adherents to the Mormon faith. Dan alone has died. James Thomas, fourth son of John and Mary (Roberts) Thomas, was educated in Wales, where he learned the tailor’s trade with his father and worked at it before he came to the United States. He followed it successfully at Salt Lake City, Utah, from the date of his arrival there until 1882,...

Biography of Hon. Burdice J. Briggs

There are few men in southern Idaho better or more favorably known than Hon. Burdice J. Briggs, a lawyer of ability and success, an up-right and patriotic citizen, and the constant promoter of the best interests of the state and its people. His effective work in the legislature in behalf of irrigation entitles him to a prominent place in any volume which purports to give an account of Idaho and her leading useful citizens. Hon. Burdice J. Briggs was born at Bellevue, Nebraska, November 21, 1859, a son of Alpheus N. and Harriet (Green) Briggs. The Briggs family in America is of English origin and Burdice J. Briggs’ ancestors came over previously to the Revolution and located in New England and New York. Alpheus N. Briggs was born in Vermont. While yet a young man, unmarried he settled with his parents in Michigan, where he was a pioneer. He married Miss Harriet Green, of Allegan, that state. Judge Henry C. Briggs, of Kalamazoo, long a legal light in Michigan, was his brother. The family were Baptists for a long period in their earlier history. Later some of them became Congregationalists. During his younger and more active years Alpheus N. Briggs was a carpenter and a farmer, and he has always proven himself a man of good knowledge and understanding and influential as a citizen. He has attained the age of sixty-four years. He lives at Council Bluffs, Iowa, with his daughter, Mrs. H. C. Compton, whose husband is battalion sergeant of the Iowa volunteers in the United States service at Manila. His wife died at Georgetown, Montana, in January...

Biography of George H. Storer

The roster of state officials of Idaho for 1898 embraced the name of George H. Storer as filling the responsible position of treasurer. He is a practical, progressive businessman, of sound judgment and keen executive ability, and upon the basis of a practical business experience he conducted the financial affairs of the state. His history is in many respects remarkable. From an humble position he has risen to one of prominence, and the success which has attended his efforts is the outcome of his own unaided labors. A native of England, he was born on the 17th of February, 1860, his parents being Dennis and Sarah (Carlisle) Storer. His father died during the early boyhood of the son, who, with his mother and three younger brothers, came to America in 1871. He was then only eleven years of age. The family made a location in Echo canyon, on the Weber river, in Utah, where they resided for eight years, during which time George Storer did what he could to support his mother and the younger children. This period was not without many hardships and trials, but he did his best to overcome these, and thus early the elemental strength of his character was shad-owed forth by actions and words. In 1879 the future state treasurer arrived in Idaho. He arrived at Black Foot with just fifty cents in his pocket, and then entered seriously upon the task of securing a livelihood, willing and anxious to follow any pursuit that was honorable. He had great energy and industry and such qualities never fail. As the years passed his labors brought...

Biography of Louis Elg

The man who first used gas for illumination at Idaho Falls, who put in the first telephone and who set up the first soda fountain in the town, is Louis Elg, druggist. Front and Maine streets. In other respects Mr. Elg has been a pioneer as well. His life has been a busy and eventful one and its important details are well worth the writing and the reading. He was born in Sweden, June 8, 1853, and is descended from a long line of Swedish ancestors. His father, also named Louis Elg, was an ironworker and was frozen to death, at the age of forty-eight, in 1867. His son Louis was then fourteen years old, and on him devolved much of the task of providing for the widow and her seven other children. He worked in a nail factory and in due course of time learned the blacksmith’s trade. In 1874, when he was twenty-one years old, he came to America. His mother is still living in her native land, being eighty years old. When Mr. Elg came to the United States he found himself seriously handicapped in his efforts to get on by reason of his total ignorance of the prevailing language of the country, but that was only one of the difficulties which he overcame as time passed. He stopped for a while in Chicago, and then located in Boone county, Iowa, and worked for a time in the coal mines there. After that he made his way to Omaha, Nebraska, where he found employment as a blacksmith. Later he worked in Van Dorn’s machine shop and...

Biography of Addison V. Scott

Addison V. Scott is well known throughout southern Idaho as a shrewd and public-spirited financier and real estate operator, and Mrs. Adelia B. (Dugan) Scott, his wife, has wide distinction as having been the first women in Idaho elected to the office of justice of the peace, the important functions of which she is discharging with admirable ability. They were married in 1883 and are among the prominent families of Idaho Falls. Addison Scott was born in Madison County, Iowa, January 14, 1858, and is descended from English-Irish ancestry. His forefathers settled early in Indiana, and Joseph Scott, his grandfather, became prominent in that state. Joseph C. Scott, son of Joseph Scott and father of Addison V. Scott, was born, reared and educated in Indiana, and there married Miss Eliza Jane Rawlings, a native of Indiana and daughter of Rev. James Rawlings, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, a man whose good life and good works had a beneficent influence upon the people among whom he lived and labored. Joseph C. Scott and Eliza Jane (Rawlings) Scott had eight children, only three of whom are living. The father died, in 1897, at the age of seventy-one. His wife, who was many years his junior, is now (1899) sixty-five years old. Addison V. Scott, their fourth child, was educated in the high schools of Iowa, principally at Burlington, and at the age of seventeen began to teach school. He was successful in the work, but a business career was more to his taste, and later he was a clerk in mercantile houses until he secured a position with a large real-estate,...

Biography of Hon. Samuel F. Taylor

Hon. Samuel F. Taylor was not a pioneer of Idaho Falls simply. He was one of a very few who were pioneers at that locality before the town had a beginning, and was active in an enterprise which was influential in locating a town at that point on the Snake river. He came to the place in 1870 with his cousin, J. M. Taylor, who with the firm of Taylor & Anderson, built the bridge across the Snake river at the falls. It was the first bridge in this part of the state, was a great aid to immigration and made Idaho Falls (then Eagle Rock) a point of so much importance on the route into this country, and to the country beyond, that the springing up of a good town there was a foregone conclusion, and only a matter of time. Samuel F. Taylor is a member of an old Kentucky family, and his paternal grandfather was a pioneer in that state. Samuel F. Taylor, Sr., his father, was born there and married Fanny Simpson, and in his time was prominent in that state. Samuel F. Taylor, Jr., was born in Kentucky April 18, 1848, and in 1849 his parents removed to Missouri and located in Lafayette County. His father was a lawyer and a farmer. The family were strict Presbyterians. Samuel F. Taylor, Sr., was an ardent southerner, and shortly after the beginning of our civil war he enlisted in the Confederate army and served under General Sterling Price, and was killed in battle at Corinth, Mississippi. Records show that he was captain of Company B, Sixth-Missouri...
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