Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of Judge James H. Fee

JUDGE JAMES H. FEE. – The present judge of the circuit court of the sixth judicial district, although having attained an eminent position is still a young man, having been born in Wisconsin in 1858. His early opportunities were of the best character. At the upper Iowa University of Fayetteville, and at Waterloo, Iowa, he laid the foundations of his education. Coming to California in 1873, he completed his course at San Jose’, and began the study of law, enjoying in his preparatory work the instructions of a priest of that city; and in 1880, at Walla Walla, he concluded his professional studies under T.J. Anders, of the law firm and Anders & Brents. In 1884 he came to Pendleton, and soon took a leading position in his profession. He so gained the confidence of the people, and gathered so much personal influence, that upon his nomination as judge of the sixth district, embracing six counties, – Union, Umatilla, Baker, Grant, Wallowa and Malheur, – although put forward as a Republican in a Democratic region, and running against a gentleman of deserved popularity, he received a majority of two hundred and ninety-eight. His associate is the able Judge L.B. Ison, of Baker City. In political circles, Judge Fee holds an essential place, having been a delegate to the Republican state convention of 1888. He also was a delegate to the convention of the officers of the Oregon National Guard, and was elected as an officer in the militia. In his own city he shares the public responsibilities, having been chief of the fire department for the term ending in...

Warhol, Peter – Obituary

Peter Warhol, 99, a former Halfway resident, died Nov. 3, 2002, at a nursing home in Cedar Falls, Iowa. He had elected to receive only comfort measures for pneumonia, thereby dying as he had lived: on his own terms. A memorial service will be held November 21, in Waterloo, Iowa. His 99-year life was remarkable for its extraordinary accomplishments. Born in Minneapolis to immigrant parents in a family of six boys, he lost his mother when he was 11, which required household chores and employment at an early age. Because of this workload, when asked for details of his boyhood he would usually say that “it wasn’t very interesting.” Characteristic of his lifelong independence and confidence was his attending his high school graduation from the audience. He and a friend had completed their college requirements and quit school a semester early. The administration had disagreed with their innovative program and refused to issue them diplomas. Overcoming obstacles of finance and health, he graduated Phi Beta Kappa in metallurgical engineering from the University of Minnesota at Minneapolis in 1929 and began an unusually creative and distinguished career. While working for the Butler Bros. Mining Co. he discovered the Fuller’s Earth District near Thomasville, Ga. On the Mesabi Iron Range in Minnesota he introduced several important mining and mineral-processing innovations still in use today. He was president of Butler Brothers when the company was sold in 1948. He spent the next 2 years with the Leo Butler Construction Co. in Washington D.C., then joined the Ogleby Norton Co. to be in charge of the first taconite development in Minnesota. This project...

Pin It on Pinterest