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Bingham County

While not one of the most populous nor one of the most wealthy counties in the state, Bingham county does not by any means stand at the foot of the list. In 1891 the Idaho Register, published at Idaho Falls, in giving a description of Bingham County, stated that it was the largest county in the state. Its length was one hundred and seventy-six miles, its width ninety miles, and it contained about fourteen thousand square miles, or about eight million acres of land; it extended from the Montana line on the north to within about twenty-one miles of the Utah line on the south. By an act approved March 6, 1893, a strip of about fifty-six miles was taken from the south end of the county and a new county formed, called Bannock county, and by an act approved March 4, at the same session of the legislature, a strip of about seventy-five miles was taken from the north end, forming a new county, called Fremont. This left Bingham county about ninety miles east and west and about forty-five miles north and south. The central portion of the county is traversed by the Snake River, and what is known as the great Snake River valley composes a large part of the central portion of the county. It is a very fertile section of country. The most extensive yield of wheat, oats, hay and potatoes is here shown. Many fields of wheat average fifty bushels to the acre, machine measure, which would usually hold out to nearly fifty-five bushels by weight, as nearly all the wheat runs sixty-two to...

Bingham County, Idaho Census Records

1870 Bingham County, Idaho Census Free 1870 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1870 Bingham County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1870 U.S. Census Guide 1880 Bingham County, Idaho Census Free 1880 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1880 Bingham County, Census (images and index) 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1880 U.S. Census Guide 1890 Bingham County, Idaho Census Free 1890 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1890 Veterans Schedule $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1890 U.S. Census Guide 1900 Bingham County, Idaho Census Free 1900 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1900 Bingham County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1900 U.S. Census Guide 1910 Bingham County, Idaho Census Free 1910 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1910 Bingham County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1910 U.S. Census Guide 1920 Bingham County, Idaho Census Free 1920 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1920 Bingham County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1920 U.S. Census Guide 1930 Bingham County, Idaho Census Free 1930 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1930 Bingham County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1930 U.S....

Biography of Benjamin A. Jenne

Character and ability will come to the front anywhere. As boy and man, many a man has been buffeted by fortune and had almost insurmountable obstacles thrust in his path, but per-severance has cleared them away and he has gone on to success. Such has been the experience of the subject of this sketch, one of the rising and popular citizens and public men of Bingham County, Idaho, a man with a heart for any venture, and a smile for friend and foe. Benjamin P. Jenne, deputy sheriff and jailer of Bingham County, Idaho, was born at Poor Man’s Gulch, California, October 22, 1855, and is descended from English and French ancestry. His grandfather, Benjamin P. Jenne, was born in France, whence he emigrated to the United States and settled in St. Lawrence County, New York. There his son Benjamin P. Jenne, 2d, was born and reared. He went, while yet a young man, to California, and there married Miss Annie Ann Richardson, who died in giving birth to her only child, the subject of this sketch. Benjamin P. Jenne, 2d, died, aged eighty-seven, in 1894. When he was four years old, Benjamin A. Jenne was taken to Ohio to live with his uncle, Ansel Jenne, and remained there, attending school after he was old enough, until he was twelve. He then went back to St. Lawrence County, New York, where he had a home with relatives, and at fifteen began to earn his own living. For two years he was a sailor on the great lakes between Ogdensburg, New York, and Chicago, Illinois. Then he went into the...

Biography of C. W. Wernicke

The County treasurer of Lincoln County, Idaho, C. W. Wernicke, is also the pioneer hardware merchant of Shoshone, and throughout the eighteen years of his residence here has been prominently connected with the various interests which have contributed to the growth, prosper-ity and advancement of town and County. He belongs to that class of progressive German citizens who have severed the ties binding them to the old world in order to seek homes in the land of the free. He was born in Goldburg, Germany, on the 13th of January, 1847, and in the land of his nativity acquired his literary education and learned the tinsmith’s trade. He was a young man of nineteen years when he decided to come to America. Hearing of the advantages afforded by the United States to young men of energy, diligence and ambition, he crossed the Atlantic resolved to try his fortune among new scenes. He had only money enough to pay his passage, and landed in New York city almost penniless, ignorant of the language and customs of the people among whom his lot was to be cast. With resolute heart, however, he started out to seek work and secured employment at his trade in Lyons, New York. Later he worked as a tinsmith in Jackson and in Paw Paw, Michigan, and after a time began business on his own ac-count on a small scale. As the days passed his industry and economy added to his capital, his business was proportionately increased, and for twelve years he successfully carried on operations in that line. The excitement over the gold discoveries at Leadville,...

Biography of Henry W. Curtis

There is a sprinkling of English blood in Idaho which adds to the moral and financial vitality of the state. One of the leading citizens of Blackfoot of English birth is ex-County Treasurer Henry W. Curtis, who was also the pioneer hardware merchant of that city. Mr. Curtis was born in London, England, August 9, 1854. His father, Joseph H. Curtis, of an old English family, married Miss Sarah Morrell, a native of London. They had seven children born to them in England, and in 1860 they came to the United States, to found a home in the New World. Mr. Curtis was a silk-weaver by trade and for about a year was employed at stocking-weaving in Philadelphia. In 1861 the family moved to Utah, and there the father died in 1877, aged sixty-four years. His wife has attained the age of eighty-four, and their children are all living. Henry W. Curtis, the youngest of the seven, was educated in public schools of Utah and began to earn his living at the early age of nine years. He has not only depended on himself since that time, but has helped others, and may be called a self-educated man. In his early efforts to get on in the world he engaged four years in freighting from Corinne, Utah, to different points in Montana. In 1874 he embarked in the hardware business and general manufacture of tinware, and in 1885 became the first hardware merchant of Blackfoot, where he met with well deserved success. He has proven himself a business man of first-class ability, and the favor with which he has...

Biography of James M. Stevens

In a new state like Idaho the really prominent men who are native to the soil are comparatively few, for the reason that few men are able to attain prominence young enough to take this distinguished position. James M. Stevens, junior member of the firm of Detrich, Chalmers & Stevens, of Blackfoot, one of Idaho’s law firms, has the distinction of being one of Idaho’s native sons. He was born January 30, 1873, at his father’s home on the bank of the Snake river, in what was then Oneida county, near where the city of Blackfoot has since come into being. He is of Scotch-English ancestry, and his forefathers settled early in New England, where four generations of the family were born, at Lynn, Massachusetts, and was there reared and educated. While yet a young man, he went to California. Not long after his arrival there, the war of the states being in progress, he enlisted in the United States army, with the expectation that the regiment would be sent south to take part in aggressive fighting. To the bitter disappointment of Judge Stevens and his comrades-in-arms, the regiment was, instead, sent into Utah to keep the Indians in subjection and defend emigrants and settlers against their attacks. At the expiration of his term of service he settled on a government ranch, which he improved and to which he added until he had one of the large and fine farms of the state, comprising five hundred acres, fitted up with first-class buildings and appointments. His home here is a beautiful one, and it was amid its refined surroundings that...

Biography of George H. Storer

The roster of state officials of Idaho for 1898 embraced the name of George H. Storer as filling the responsible position of treasurer. He is a practical, progressive businessman, of sound judgment and keen executive ability, and upon the basis of a practical business experience he conducted the financial affairs of the state. His history is in many respects remarkable. From an humble position he has risen to one of prominence, and the success which has attended his efforts is the outcome of his own unaided labors. A native of England, he was born on the 17th of February, 1860, his parents being Dennis and Sarah (Carlisle) Storer. His father died during the early boyhood of the son, who, with his mother and three younger brothers, came to America in 1871. He was then only eleven years of age. The family made a location in Echo canyon, on the Weber river, in Utah, where they resided for eight years, during which time George Storer did what he could to support his mother and the younger children. This period was not without many hardships and trials, but he did his best to overcome these, and thus early the elemental strength of his character was shad-owed forth by actions and words. In 1879 the future state treasurer arrived in Idaho. He arrived at Black Foot with just fifty cents in his pocket, and then entered seriously upon the task of securing a livelihood, willing and anxious to follow any pursuit that was honorable. He had great energy and industry and such qualities never fail. As the years passed his labors brought...

Biography of N. P. Nielson

N. P. Nielson, treasurer of Bannock County, and a pioneer grocer of Pocatello, is a native of Denmark, his birth having occurred in that country, September 17, 1852. He was the second in order of birth in a family of two sons and two daughters, whose parents were Peter and Mary (Henson) Nielson, also natives of the same country. The subject of this sketch came to America in 1868, and four years later the rest of the family also crossed the Atlantic, taking up their residence in Utah, where the father died at the age of sixty-four years, the mother passing away several years previously. The brother of our subject is also deceased, but the two sisters are still living. N. P. Nielson acquired his education in the schools of his native land, and after coming to the United States took up his residence in Salt Lake City, Utah, where he secured a position as clerk in the old Townsend House. Later he occupied a similar position in the Keeney House, in Ogden, Utah, and in 1880 he came to Blackfoot, Idaho, where he assisted in opening a hotel, also known as the Keeney House. There he remained until 1885, when he took up his residence in Pocatello. Here he served as clerk in the Pacific Hotel for a time, but was soon afterward elected constable of the town and served in that capacity for two years, in a most efficient and acceptable manner. It was then a rough railroad town of twenty-five hundred population, and his duties were difficult and arduous, but he discharged them without fear or...

Biography of Hon. George B. Rogers

Some men achieve success almost instantaneously, some by slow accretion, others only after long and patient working and waiting. The experience of men who are willing to work persistently and intelligently and wait calmly goes to prove that success may surely be attained during an ordinary lifetime, and no man not cut off at an untimely age need work and wait in vain. These reflections have been suggested by a consideration of the career of Hon. George B. Rogers, receiver of the United States land office at Blackfoot, Idaho, who is one of the most prominent and successful citizens of the state. He was born in Dodgeville, Iowa County, Wisconsin, February 22, 1842. His father, John Rogers, was born in England and there married Miss Hannah Bailey. They came to the United States in 1837, bringing with them two daughters, named Susan and Elizabeth, and located at Mineral Point, Wisconsin, where Mr. Rogers engaged in lead-mining and later became a farmer. He died in 1880, aged seventy-six years, and his wife passed away in 1882, aged seventy-three. They were lifelong members and supporters of the Methodist Episcopal church. Six more children were born to them in Wisconsin, of whom George B. Rogers was the second in order of nativity and of whom two others are living. George B. Rogers was brought up on his father’s farm and at a tender age gained an intimate acquaintance with hard work and long hours. The winter schools of that day and locality were poor, but such as they were he attended as opportunity presented, and later he attended night schools, but he...

Biography of Daniel H. Clyne

A captivating address, a cheerful manner and a friendly interest in those with whom one comes in contact will not alone make success for any man, but all things being about equal, these three things will give their possessor supremacy over any competitors who do not possess them or possess them in a lesser degree. This means that some men are able to make many personal friends, well-wishers and helpers, and any warm personal friend is a material assistance to any man in any business. Sheriff Clyne, of Bingham County, Idaho, has this faculty of binding others to him, a faculty which is none the less potent because it is exerted unconsciously, and to the kindly and helpful interest of his friends he attributes much of the success he has achieved. It should be added that a good deal has been expected of him and he has been equal to all demands placed upon him. Daniel Henry Clyne is of German lineage on the paternal side and was born in Indiana, in 1857. Thomas Clyne, his father, married Miss Sarah A. Keeney, a native of Pennsylvania, and the father now lives in Kansas. They had seven children, four of whom are living. Daniel Henry Clyne, fourth in order of birth, was reared in Nebraska and educated himself in the school of experience. He began life as a cowboy, and later embarked in the stock business on his own account. He came to Idaho Falls in 1890 and for a time was employed in a livery stable. Subsequently he was enabled to open a stable of his own, and by...
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