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Hitchiti Indians

Hitchiti Tribe. Perhaps from Atcik-hata, a term formerly applied to all of the Indians who spoke the Hitchiti language, and is said to refer to the heap of white ashes piled up close to the ceremonial ground. Also called: At-pasha-shliha, Koasati name, meaning “mean people.” Hitchiti Connections. The Hitchiti belonged to the Muskhogean linguistic family and were considered the mother town of the Atcik-hata group. (See Apalachicola) Hitchiti Location. The Hitchiti are oftenest associated with a location in the present Chattahoochee County, Georgia, but at an earlier period were on the lower course of the Ocmulgee River. (See also Florida and Oklahoma.) Hitchiti Villages Hihaje, location unknown. Hitchitoochee, on Flint River below its junction with Kinchafoonee Creek. Tuttallosag, on a creek of the same name, 20 miles west from Hitchitoochee. Hitchiti History. The Hitchiti are identifiable with the Ocute of De Soto’s chroniclers, who were on or near the Ocmulgee River. Early English maps show their town on the site of the present Macon, Georgia, but after 1715 they moved to the Chattahoochee, settling first in Henry County, Alabama, but later at the site above mentioned in Chattahoochee County, Georgia. From this place they moved to Oklahoma, where they gradually merged with the rest of the Indians of the Creek Confederacy. Hitchiti Population. The population of the Hitchiti is usually given in conjunction with that of the other confederate tribes. The following separate estimates of the effective male Hitchiti population are recorded: 1738, 60; 1750, 15; 1760, 50; 1761, 40; 1772, 90; in 1832 the entire population was 381. Connection in which they have become noted. In early days,...

Edwards, Elsie Ammons – Obituary

Mrs. Elsie Harris, 49, of 3277 Washington Way, Longview, died Nov. 23 in a local hospital. She was born Jan. 3, 1914 in Macon, Ga., and was a member of the Kelso Assembly of God Church. She also served as a swimming instructor for retarded children at the Longview YMCA. She is survived by the widower, Marshall; three daughters, Mrs. Esther Carrol, Portland; Mrs. Jane Carrol, Fresno, Calif.; Mrs. Barbara Fitch, Bakersfield, Calif; two brothers, the Rev. Bert Ammons, Kelso; Melvin Ammons, Longview; four sisters, Velma Allender, Longview; Mrs. Georgia Ryan, Rainier; Mrs. Lorene McAllister, Aberdeen; Mrs. Ruth Evenson, Clatskanie, and nine grandchildren. Contributed by: Shelli...

Achese: Birthplace of the Creek Confederacy

The four versions of the de Soto Chronicles say very little about this American Indian town, whose ruins are now known as “the Lamar Village Component of Ocmulgee National Monument.” This is surprising, since the town figures prominently in Creek Indian history. In fact, the chroniclers could not even agree on the town’s name. The Gentleman of Elvas called the town, Achese. Other versions called it Ochese, Ichese and Uchese. English colonists, 200 years later, would call it Ochese. That name stuck.

United Brotherhood of Georgia

The most important gathering of Negroes that probably has ever occurred, was in Macon, Ga., a few weeks since. Five hundred leading Negro representatives convened to discuss and adopt “a thorough plan of State organization.” A permanent organization was effected and named the “United Brotherhood of Georgia,” the purpose of which is “to resist oppression, wrong and injustice.” We note the following resolutions, which were passed by the convention: Resolved, That we, in convention assembled, respectfully but earnestly demand of the powers that be, that the Negro be given what, and only what, he is entitled to. Resolved further, That never, until we are in the fullest enjoyment of our rights at the ballot-box, will we cease to agitate and work for what justly belongs to us in the shape of suffrage. Further resolved, That it shall be the policy of the colored race to vote so as to bring the greatest division to the white voters of this country, for in this we believe lies the boon of our desire. The last resolution is not entirely plain to us, and we refrain from comment upon it, but the convention itself, the fact of leadership taking shape among the Negroes, and the forth-putting of their purposes, are very significant. When the Glenn Bill was born, and when the Georgia House of Representatives stood sponsor for its baptism, we believed that the enemy of righteousness had made a mistake, and that this particular piece of artillery would kick. They who think to thwart the providence’s of God usually help them forward. Christianity has had many a help from its opposers....

Biography of Hon. Edward Hirsch

HON. EDWARD HIRSCH. – Someone has written, “There’s a divinity that shapes our ends, rough hew them as we may;” and the subject of this sketch is a living exemplification of it. When, away back in “the fifties,” he landed a poor boy in the city of New York, among strangers in a strange land, and looked about him for honest employment in any capacity, how little he dreamed that as years passed by he would hold the purse-strings for the then almost unknown territory of Oregon, when a few years later she should lay aside her swaddling clothes and emerge into the maidenhood of a young and prosperous commonwealth. Such has been his career, however; and no man in the state stands higher in the estimation of the people than does Honorable Edward Hirsch, ex-State Treasurer. He was born at Wurtemberg, Germany, May 3, 1836, and came to America in 1855. Landing in New York City, he at once sought employment. Proving unsuccessful, however, he went over into the neighboring State of Pennsylvania, and secured a clerkship in a store in a little town in Mercer county, at the princely salary of seventy-five dollars per annum. He remained there for several months, and then went down into the State of Georgia, where he remained nearly two years, the greater part of the time at Macon. He became thoroughly acquainted with Southern life in all its varied phases, and to this day bears pleasant recollections of his sojourn in the sunny South. Becoming imbued, however, with the Western fever, he again went north, and in company with his brother,...

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