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Biography of F. H. Penley

Fortunate is the community which had citizens with the substantial conservatism of practical business men and yet are forward looking in matters of new development and improvement. In the matter of towns and communities there is perhaps more truth in Ingalls’ statement that opportunity knocks but once at the door, than in its application to individuals. Recently the oil district of Southern Kansas was extended into Butler County. By the good sense and public spirit of several local citizens, prominent among whom is F. H. Penley, president of the First National Bank of Augusta, this sudden development of great natural wealth and resources was utilized to the distinct advantage of what had been merely a country village, and Augusta is now on a fair way to become one of the thriving centers of population and industry in the state. Mr. Penley represents a pioneer family in Butler County and he had been personally identified with the business and civic life of this section of Kansas for forty years. He came to Kansas when a boy. He was born in the State of Maine at Bethel in Oxford County in 1856. His parents, Charles Freeland and Abbie (Locke) Penley, were also natives of Maine. They came to Kansas in 1870, locating about two miles north of Augusta. Charles F. Penley took up a homestead claim and was engaged in farming and stock raising there the rest of his active career. The Penleys were early comers and what they did and the influenee they exercised had its marked impress upon the subsequent development of the county. Mr. F. H. Penlcy was...

Biography of Hon. L. F. Grover

HON. L.F. GROVER. – Governor La Fayette Grover was born in Bethel, Maine, November 29, 1823, of ancestry on both sides distinguished in the early and late history of Massachusetts. He is a brother of Major Abernethy Grover, a man of distinction in the politics of Maine and in the war of the Rebellion; of Professor Talleyrand Grover, an eminent classist; and of General Cuvier Grover, a skillful commander in the war of the Rebellion. He was educated at the Classical Academy of Bethel, and at Bowdoin College, Maine. He studied law in Philadelphia under the instruction of the late Asa I. Fish, and was admitted to the bar there in March, 1850. Late in the autumn of that year, he took passage on a merchant vessel bound round Cape Horn to San Francisco, where he arrived in July, 1851, and in the next month reached Portland by the old steamer Columbia. He at once proceeded to Salem, where he established himself as a layer. The first regular term of the United States district court was held at Salem in the following month; and on the invitation of Chief Justice Nelson, who presided over the court, Mr. Grover became the clerk, stipulating that he would accept the position temporarily, and until a suitable successor could be appointed. He held the office six months, obtaining an excellent acquaintance with local court procedure, and with jurors, witnesses and litigants. The following spring, resigning the clerkship, he formed a law partnership with Benjamin F. Harding, afterwards United States district attorney, secretary of the territory of Oregon, and United States senator. With him...

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