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Baxter Family of Norwich Vermont

The Baxters of this town came here from Norwich, Connecticut, a town which their ancestors with others from Norwich, England, assisted in founding about the year 1632. Elihu Baxter, with his young wife, Tryphena Taylor, to whom he was married October 24, 1777, arrived in Norwich the same year, and here fifteen children (six daughters and nine sons) were born to them, twelve of whom lived to grow up and have families of their own. Mr. Baxter settled on the farm that subsequently became the home of Hon. Paul Brigham. He later removed to the farm where Orson Sargent lives, and there built himself a frame house, a part of which is now in use by the present owner of the property. Of his children: William Baxter, the eldest, born August 3, 1778, studied law with Hon. Daniel A. Buck of Norwich, and removed to Bennington, Vt., where he soon became the leading lawyer in that part of the state, and received many honors from his town and county. He married Lydia Ashley of Norwich, August 17, 1779, and died at Bennington October 1, 1826, aged forty nine years. Hiram Baxter settled in Bennington a little after 1800. Elihu Baxter, Jr., the third child, born in 1781, died at Portland, Me., in 1863, where he had been in the practice of medicine for many years. Chester Baxter, born in 1785, died at Sharon, Vt., in 1863. He married Hannah Root and they had one daughter who married, Deane. James Baxter, the sixth son, born in 1788, established himself at Stanstead, L. C., in 1817, where he became very prominent...

Biographical Sketch of Edward M. Ruttenber

Journalist and historian, was born in the Town of Bennington, Vt., July 17, 1824. He entered the office of the Vermont Gazette as an apprentice to the printing business in 1837, and removed to Newburgh in 1838, where he became an indentured apprentice in the office of the Newburgh Telegraph, of which he became the owner in 1850. He was thereafter connected with Newburgh journalism as editor and publisher during his entire life, dying at the advanced age of 83 years on December 4, 1907, at Newburgh, N. Y. As a historian he was thorough and exhaustive, and to him, more than to any other local historian, is perhaps due the credit of preserving for future generations the vast mass of historical data relating to Orange County and the Hudson River Valley. He is the author of the following works: History of the Town of Newburgh, 1859; History of the Flags of New York Regiments, 1865; History of the Obstructions to the Navigation of the Hudson River, 1866; History of the Indian Tribes of the Hudson River, 1872; History of Orange County, 1881. All of these works are universally regarded as standard authorities on the subjects treated and show ample evidence of his exhaustive research and ability as a...

Biography of Major Edward Carlisle Boynton

Major E. C. Boynton, a graduate of West Point Military Academy, and for many years an instructor in that institution, is chiefly distinguished as the author of the “History of West Point and the Origin and Progress of the U. S. Military Academy,” and several technical works, all of which are regarded as standard authorities on the subjects of which they treat. He was appointed as a cadet at the United States Military Academy, July 1, 1841. After graduation in 1846, he was assigned to the Second Artillery as Brevet Second Lieutenant and ordered to join the army in, Mexico, where he served with General Taylor at the front of the invading force. He served at Monterey and at the seizure of Saltillo in 1846. He participated in the siege of Vera Cruz, the battles of Cerro Gardo, Contreras, Churubusco, in the seizure and occupation of Puebla and in the skirmishes at Amazoque and Oka Laka in 1847. He was severely wounded in the action at Cherubusco. He was promoted Second Lieutenant February 16, 1847, and First Lieutenant, August 20, 1847, and Brevet Captain at the same time for “gallant and meritorious services in the battles of Contreras and Cherubusco, Mexico.” In 1848 he was assigned to the Military Academy at West Point as Assistant Acting Quartermaster. From August, 1848, to September, 1855, he was Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Mineralogy and Geology. In 1855-56 he accompanied the expedition against the Seminole Indians in Florida. The degree of A. M. was conferred on him by Brown University in 1856. In 1856 he was appointed Professor of Chemistry, Mineralogy and Geology...

Biography of Coe C. Horton

(X) Coe C., son of Isaiah (2) Horton, was born at Springwater, Livingston county, New York, April 12. 1864. He attended the district schools and the Victor high school. In 1882 he engaged in the lumber trade at Avon, New York; in 1889 he came to Victor and has followed farming there to the present time. He was for four years employed by the Wabash railroad in Ohio, Indiana and Illinois. He was for one year in the employ of the New York Times of New York City, and three years in the furniture and hardware business in Bennington, Vermont. For seven years he was engaged in core drilling, testing mineral lands. He has a farm of ninety-two acres at Victor and fine orchards and herds of Dorset sheep. He is a member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen. In politics he is a Prohibitionist, in religion a Methodist. He married, April 11, 1894, Marie Strong, born at Port Gibson, Ontario county, New York, October 3, 1861, daughter of Ashbel Strong, who was born at Waltham, Vermont, December 14, 1813, and followed his trade as painter and decorator in Port Gibson, married, December 10, 1843, Hannah (Hazen) Phelps, born in Dutchess county, March 15, 1818, died December 3, 1891. During his younger days, Mr. Strong followed the sea on a whaling vessel. He died September 19, 1891. Mrs. Strong married (first), Selden Phelps, and had Charles E. Phelps, born January 8, 1837, died October 4, 1837; Charles E. Phelps, born at Manchester, October 12, 1838, married, in 1861, Ellen Loomis; Sarah Jane Phelps, born December 29, 1840, married, April...

Biography of Isaac G. Perry

ISAAC G. PERRY AN architect of high standing and great popularity in his profession is Isaac G. Perry, the regular capitol commissioner, whose official residence is now in Albany. Born in Bennington, Vt., of Scottish ancestry, on the 24th of March, 1822, he passed his earliest days amidst the grand, patriotic scenes of the Green mountains, breathing pure, invigorating air and laying the foundation of a strong constitution. His father, Seneca Perry, a native of White Creek, Washington County, N. Y., and a carpenter and joiner by trade, died in 1868. His mother, whose maiden name was Martha Ann Taggart, was born at Londenary, N. H., and died in 1860. She was ardently attached to the old Presbyterian faith. His grandfather was Valentine Perry, and his grandmother, Patient (Hays) Perry, both of White Creek. His grandmother on his maternal side was Mary Woodburn of Londenary, N. H. The Woodburns came from Scotland to this country at an early date, and settled in Londenary and its vicinity. His parents removed to Keeseville, Essex County, N. Y., when their son Isaac was a lad of seven years. There he attended the village school for several terms, and served an apprenticeship with his father as a carpenter and joiner, pursuing his studies in this line with the greatest enthusiasm from early morn until late at night. He may, in fact, be called a born architect, so early did this subject engross his thoughts and fire his ambition. And so speedily did he acquire knowledge of its elementary principles that in a short time he began to do work on his own account....

Biographical Sketch of Robert Cochran

Robert Cochran, from Bennington, an early settler in the eastern part, died in old age. He reared a family of ten children, all but one of whom located in the town. Robert, his second son, born in 1790, served in the war of 1812, resided here until 1840, then removed to the West, where he died in 1850. Samantha, one of thirteen children, born in 1808, still resides...

Biographical Sketch of Samuel Blaisdell

Samuel Blaisdell, from Bennington, Vt., located in the central part of the town at an early day, where he died in 1812, aged eighty years. He reared nine sons and four daughters, nearly all of whom settled in the town. Joseph, the second son, born in 1789, came with his father, and spent the remainder of his life here, excepting the last few days, which were passed where he died, in Brookfield. Of his family of nine children, only one settled in the town. Harry, his oldest son, born in 1805, still resides...

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