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Biography of Col. Eli Dodson

COL. ELI DODSON. This gentleman is the intelligent, trustworthy and efficient county and probate judge of Boone County, Arkansas, and in his official capacity has comported himself with dignity, good sound judgment and judicial fairness. He has resided in the county since 1881, but has been a resident of northwest Arkansas since 1852, whither he came from Madison County, Arkansas, in 1834. He was born on his father’s farm in White County, Tennessee, May 22, 1828, the only child of Eli and Mary (Goad) Dodson, the former of whom was born in Virginia in 1798, a son of William Dodson, who helped free this country from British rule by serving in the Revolutionary War. Eli Dodson, the father, died before his son was born and he was also left motherless when two and a half years old. He was reared by his uncle, Alexander Goad, and came with him to this State. His boyhood days were characterized by farm labor, for he unfortunately received no educational advantages until he reached manhood and after his marriage, which event took place in 1847, and was to Miss Rhoda C. Cantrell, daughter of Abner Cantrell, to which marriage twelve children were given: William Y., Mary, Margaret, James A., Elizabeth, Martha D., Rhoda A., Virginia, Eli S., Alice, Melvina R., and Leota B., all of whom are living except the last mentioned. The mother of these children was called from this life April 14, 1870, and Mr. Dodson took for his second wife Mrs. Mary E. Hastings, who lived only a few months after her marriage, dying in February, 1871. Mr. Dodson’s present...

Biography of C. C. Hudson

C. C. HUDSON. Many of the most active and enterprising residents of Newton County are natives of the same, and have here spent the greater part of their lives. In them we find men of true loyalty to the interests of this part of the State who understand as it were by instinct the needs, social and industrial, of this vicinity, and who have a thorough knowledge of its resources. They are, therefore, better adapted to succeed here than a stranger could be and are probably without exception warmly devoted to the prosperity of their native place. Mr. C. C. Hudson, a successful farmer and stockraiser of Jackson Township, Newton County, Arkansas, was born in this county, in 1858, and is a son of Samuel and Nancy (Billah) Hudson, both natives of Tennessee, the former born about 1811, and the later in 1818. When about seven years of age the father was brought by his parents to Lawrence County, Arkansas, and he there grew to mature years, married and made his home until 1832, when he came to what is now Newton County, Arkansas He cut his way through the unbroken forest, then inhabited by Indians and wild animals, and located on the creek that bears his name, three miles above Jasper, where he was the first white settler. He became one of the wealthiest and best known citizens of the county, and followed farming and stockraising exclusively until 1860, when he built a grist mill above Mount Parthenon. This he operated until 1873, when he built a mill where Matlock’s Mill now stands, and conducted this for eight...

Biography of Maj. Harrison H. Hilton

MAJOR HARRISON H. HILTON. The gentleman whose name heads this sketch is one of the prosperous old-time merchants of Arkansas, and is one of the pioneers of the section in which he resides. He has fought the hard battle of life bravely and well, has bent the force of circumstances to his will, and although he began at the bottom round of the ladder, he has attained an enviable place at the top through sheer force of character. He was born in Ashe County, N. C., in 1826, a son of Christopher and Josephine (Wolf) Hilton, who were born in Rockingham County, Virginia, their marriage taking place in the Old North State. After residing there for some time they returned to their native county in Virginia, where the father died in 1831, at about the age of sixty-five years, having been a farmer throughout life. The mother died in Monroe County, Tennessee, and Harrison H. Hilton is her only surviving child, a daughter having died many years ago. At the age of fourteen years the subject of this sketch came West and began farming on the Arkansas River, near Clarksville, Johnson County, Arkansas In 1850 he took up his residence at Bellefonte, Boone County, where, in 1861, he organized the First Arkansas Battalion of Confederate Cavalry and was at once given the rank of major. He served until captured near Marshfield, Missouri, in 1863, and after being kept a prisoner at St. Louis for a time was paroled. During his service he was on scouting duty the most of the time. At the close of the war he went...

Biography of J. H. Walters

J. H. WALTERS. To attain happiness we strive for the acquisition of wealth or position, and, if one is possessed of the first and has native ability and ambition, the second falls to him as his natural heritage. In the acquirement of wealth fortune smiles on those alone who are watching for the opportunity she offers, and J. H. Walters is one of those who has shown himself to be a wide-awake, systematic business man, and has made the most of every opportunity that has presented itself. He was born in Virginia, October 26, 1823, a son of William and Tally (Ingram) Walters, who were of Irish and English descent, the former a native of Virginia. The paternal grandfather was a captain in the Revolutionary War. J. H. Walters spent his youthful days on a farm, was married in the State of his birth, and in 1847 moved. to Yalobusha County, Miss., where he made his home until after the war, in which struggle he participated, and during which time he lost the handsome fortune which he had accumulated. He has devoted his attention to merchandising the greater part of his life and is still to some extent engaged in this occupation, his home being in Bellefonte. He has been largely engaged in the buying and selling of cattle and mules, and is the owner of about 15,000 acres of land, a large portion of which is under cultivation. He is one of the wealthiest men of Boone County, and what he has has been earned through his own good judgment and energy. Although he received no schooling in...

Biography of James S. Hudson

JAMES S. HUDSON. This gentleman is one of the substantial residents of Newton County, Arkansas, and is also one of the pioneers of the same, for he has resided here since his birth, which occurred on February 4, 1857. His uncle, Samuel Hudson, was the first white settler of the county, having come to this region in 1830, and his brother, Andrew Hudson, the father of James S., came here in 1835 from his native county of Jackson,Tennessee, where he was born in 1818. He settled on a farm about three miles west of where Jasper now is on Little Buffalo Creek, and so dense was the cane along that bottom that he was compelled to get out and cut a road through it. He lived on this farm for some years, but later moved to a farm one mile west of Jasper, on which his son William now resides, and where he died in the fall of 1891. He was quite successful in the accumulation of worldly goods, and was a substantial, law-abiding and public-spirited citizen. In his political views he always supported the principles of Democracy and at one time ably filled the office of county treasurer. Wild game was abundant when he first came to this section, and he and his brother Samuel became well known as hunters, for many were the deer and bears that fell victims to their unerring marksmanship. Mr. Hudson was married to Miss Sarah Holt, a native of Tennessee, who survived him about one year, having become the mother of the following children: Nancy, married I.J. Dum and died in California;...

Biography of De Roos Bailey

Of the younger element of our prominent, energetic and influential citizens, none are better known than De Roos Bailey, one of the distinguished attorneys of the northwestern part of Arkansas, whose home is at Harrison. During the years that he has practiced his profession here he has shown that he is endowed with superior ability, and his comprehensive knowledge of the law, together with the soundness of his judgment, secured his almost immediate recognition at the bar. Since that time to the present he has so identified himself with the affairs of his section that its history can-not be recorded without according him a conspicuous and honorable part. He was born in Carroll County, Arkansas, May 27, 1857, and traces his ancestry back to his great-great-grandfather, William Bailey, who came to this country from England many years prior to the Revolution and is supposed to have settled in one of the Carolinas. His son, William, however, was born in Virginia, from which State he enlisted in the Colonial Army during the Revolutionary War, at the age of sixteen years; he died at the advanced age of eighty-six years. John Bailey, the grandfather of De Roos Bailey, was born in the Old North State, and was the first to establish the Bailey family in Tennessee. At a very early day he came with his wife, Beersheba (Cunningham) Bailey, to Arkansas and located on a farm on Crooked Creek, Carroll (now Boone) County, and died in 1876. He and his wife reared the following children: M. J. (Rosson); W. W.; M.. of Walnut Springs, Tex.; Calaway, who died in 1887; Washington,...

Biography of J.B. Eagel

J. B. Eagel, son-in-law of J. H. Walters, has been a resident of Boone County, Arkansas, for the past ten years, but was born in another part of the county August 25, 1853, the second of twelve children born to Dock and Serena (Swain) Eagel, the former of whom was born in Maury County, Tennessee, in 1824. In 1839 he came to Arkansas, and until his death in 1873, resided in Lonoke County. He was an uncle of ex-Gov. Eagel of the State. He was a Mexican soldier, a soldier in the Civil War, was a Democrat in politics and throughout life followed farming. He was married in Lonoke County, and his wife was a daughter of Jerry Swain, who came from Tennessee to Arkansas about 1840, and she still resides on the old homestead in the county where she was married. Her children were: William, who, with his father and Robert Engel, a brother of Gov. Eagel, was killed by a party of Negroes whom they were trying to arrest for stealing, was but twenty-one years old at the time of his death; J. B.; Jennie, who died when young; Joseph, who is living on a farm in Lonoke County; Frances, wife of L. H. Halloway of Lonoke County; James, who lives with his mother; Charity, widow of Goodman Swain; Robert; Thomas; George, who was killed by accidental discharge of a gun; Pettus, and two children that died in infancy. The father, Dock Eagel, and James Eagel, father of Gov. Eagel, were quite noted Nimrods in the early history of the State and sold large quantities of game...

Biography of Kemmer F. Cantrell

The general mercantile firm, of which this gentle-man is a member, Cantrell & Angle, is well-known throughout Marion County, and enjoys a liberal patronage. Mr. Cantrell is a member of one of the pioneer families of Arkansas, and was born November 8, 1853, a son of William P. and Elizabeth (Payne) Cantrell, and grandson of Abner and Mary (Maxey) Cantrell. In 1830 the grandfather’s family emigrated from Alabama, taking up their abode in Madison County, Arkansas, but in 1854 removed to Boone (then Carroll) County, and located on a farm three miles from Lead Hill, but settled eventually in Marion County. There the grandfather died in 1889, at the advanced age of ninety-seven years, being probably the oldest man in the county at that time. He enjoyed remarkably good health all his life, was active and energetic, and was a thrifty and highly-respected farmer. To him-self and wife, who died in 1870, a large family of children were given, of whom William P. Cantrell was the eldest, the others being Thomas, Henry, Marian, John, Edward, Caroline, Adaline, Melissa, Jane, Catherine and Elizabeth. Edward is the only son living and Caroline is the only daughter who is dead. William P. Cantrell was fourteen years of age when he became a resident of Arkansas. He was married in Madison County. In 1854 he came to Marion County, and on the farm near Lead Hill he lived during the war. He was for a short time in the Confederate service, was captured by the Federals, and after taking the oath of allegiance he moved to Pulaski County, Missouri He returned to Arkansas...

Biography of Dr. Calvin J. Floyd

DR. CALVIN J. FLOYD. He whose name heads this sketch has built up a large practice by steady devotion to duty and the constant exercise of energy and judgment, and, though he belongs to the younger class of physicians, he has already made an excellent reputation for himself in this most honorable, if laborious, line of human endeavor. The Doctor was born in Independence County, Arkansas, December 15, 1859, a son of E. N. and Martha (Russell) Floyd, the former of whom was born in Jackson County, Ala., and is now living on a farm on Crooked Creek in Boone County, whither he came at about the close of the war, having become a resident of Independence County in 1858. He espoused the Confederate cause during the Civil War and was appointed captain of Company G, in an Arkansas Infantry regiment, with which he did gallant service during that great struggle. He has now reached the age of sixty-three years, is hale and vigorous, and in politics has always been a Democrat, as are also his sons. He and wife are the parents of five children: Isaac S., who is a farmer and a man of a family; Paulina T. is the deceased wife of Blake Smith, her death occurring in Boone County in 1871; Elizabeth is the wife of D. A. Eoff, sheriff of this county; Dr. Calvin J.; and Ella P., who is the wife of Frank Eoff, a farmer of this county. Mrs. Floyd was married prior to her marriage with Mr. Floyd, and by her first husband became the mother of two children: Mark and...

Biography of Dr. James M. Robinson

DR. JAMES M. ROBINSON. This successful old medical practitioner is well known for his genial personality, his ready and kindly sympathy with those who come to him as invalids, and for this reason his clientele is perhaps even larger than would have been attracted by his recognized ability and the success which has attended his efforts. He belongs to that class of physicians who recognize the fact that there is something more than a barren ideality in “ministering to a mind diseased,” or, in other words, that the mental condition of the patient has in many cases much to do with his physical condition, and always endeavors to leave his patients in a happy and hopeful frame of mind where the nature of the disease renders this possible. The Doctor was born in Marion County, Ala., October 16, 1823, a son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Evans) Robinson, the former of whom was born in North Carolina and took up his residence in Alabama at an early day. He later settled in Mississippi, and died there in 1848. His widow afterward removed to Louisiana, where she was called from life in 1865. The Doctor was the fourth of eight children born to this worthy couple, whose names are here given: Minerva, Reese; Sarah (Forsythe), of Boone County, Arkansas; James M., Samuel, William, Lucy J. and David T., the latter being a physician of Cooper, Tex., and he and Samuel and William were soldiers during the Civil War. James Evans, grand-father of the Doctor, was an Englishman by birth, was an early emigrant to America, took part in the Revolutionary War...

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