Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Graveyard 2, Belknap County, New Hampshire Cemetery

GARLAND Sarah P., d. 19 Apr. 1881, ae. 71 yrs. Wife of David Garland. Rev. David, d. 6 Feb. 1863, ae. 71 yrs., 1 mo., 19 days. Pastor of 2nd Freewill Baptist Church, Barnstead. Abigail, d. 16 Dec. 1830, ae. 58 yrs., 10 mos., 10 days. Wife of Elder David Garland. Ella G., d. 2 Oct. 1854, ae. 2 yrs., 10 mos. Dau. of D.D. & O.S. Garland. Died in Boston, Mass. Clara M., d. 2 Oct. 1851, ae. 8 mos., 10 days. Dau. of O.S. Garland. Died in Boston. Oscar S., d. 1 Mar. 1859, ae. 1 yr., 10 mos., 17 days. Son of D.D. & O.S. Garland. Died in Boston, Mass. Cyrus Frink, d. 4 July 1846, ae. 29 yrs., 5 mos., 10 days. Emily S., d. 7 Oct. 1850, ae. 27 yrs., 6 mos. Wife of the late Cyrus F. Garland. Died at Charlestown, Mass. Sarah J. McNeal, d. 6 Feb. 1901, ae. 78 yrs., 11 mos., 2 days. Dau. of Rev. David Garland. EVANS Martha A., d. 23 Aug. 1860, ae. 5 mos., 8 days. Died at Boston. Dau. of John G. and Mary S. Evans. MCNEAL Albin J., d. 20 July 1852, ae. 2 yrs., 4 mos. Son of Jonathan & Sarah J. McNeal. Died in...

Biography of John W. Daniels

The public-school system of Boise is a monument to the character and labors of Professor John W. Daniels. There is no nobler profession to which man may devote his energies than that of the teacher. What man prominent in public life does not attribute his success in a considerable measure to the influence of some teacher whose instruction he enjoyed in youth? The thoughts implanted in the young minds grow and develop, and largely shape the destinies of those by whom they have been received. It is therefore of the utmost importance that the training of the young shall be entrusted to those who have a just appreciation of the responsibilities that rest upon them, who realize the value of physical, mental and moral development, who can instruct the children how best to use their powers, and, while promoting intellectual activity, neglect not to sow the seeds of character that will produce high ideals of manhood and womanhood. Such is the mission of the teacher, and such has been the life work of John W. Daniels. Professor Daniels was born in England, on the 1st of January, 1846, and when five years of age was brought to America by his parents, Thomas and Margaret (Sullivan) Daniels, who crossed the Atlantic with their five children, and located near Boston, Massachusetts. The father had learned the dyer’s trade in England and had become very proficient in that line of work, which he successfully followed during his residence in this country. He departed this life in the sixty-third year of his age, his wife having died ten years previously. Their son, John...

Biography of Dr. Clark W. Sylvester

Dr. Clark W. Sylvester, one of Riverside’s wealthy and most esteemed citizens, was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, in 1850, son of Sewell and Mary J. (Foster) Sylvester, both natives of Maine. The father was an iron founder by trade, and although a hard-working man, with nothing but his daily labor to depend upon for the maintenance of his family, he was possessed with the innate sense of honor and the principles of a gentleman. He toiled assiduously and took upon himself liabilities to give a good education to his son, who, during vacations, worked respectively in a grocery, paint shop, machine shop and iron foundry, and even during his terms of study often supported himself by such work as he could find to do during spare hours. His college course he never quite finished, for at the age of twenty-one he became imbued with the conviction that the expenses attendant upon his course of studies and his graduation was more than his father, whose health had recently suffered, could bear, and that his father, in reality, was more in need of assistance than able to give it. Dr. Sylvester being a youth of studious habits and of an ambitious disposition, mastered the leading branches of study in the high schools of North and South Andover, Massachusetts, then entered the Maine State Academy, in Lewiston, Maine, after which he passed through, a course of study in the Nichols Latin School and Lewiston, Maine, and then graduated from the New Hampton Institute, New Hampton, New Hampshire, and prepared himself for Dartmouth College, but being unable to carry out this design he...

Belknap County, New Hampshire Cemetery Records

New Hampshire Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the New Hampshire county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Belknap County Following Cemeteries Hosted at AccessGenealogy Barnstead Barnstead Centre Graveyard Barnstead Parade Ground Graveyard 1 Graveyard 2 Graveyard 3 Graveyard 4 Gilmanton Following Hosted at Belknap County NHGenWeb Archives Smith Meeting House Burial Ground Smith Meeting House Burial Ground, file 1 Smith Meeting House Burial Ground, file 3-5 Smith Meeting House Burial Ground, file 6...

Biography of William Sargent Ladd

WILLIAM SARGENT LADD. – Of the gentlemen who came to Oregon with the purpose of forming here not only a settled social and political, but also a determinate business order, there is none to-day more prominent than W.S. Ladd. Our state has often invited comparison between her leading men and those of other parts of the nation, not at all fearing that she should suffer even if the investigation and analysis were carried to the extreme. But, in the case of the gentleman before us, such a comparison would never be thought of, since he has long been reckoned among the most wealthy men of the nation even in this age of colossal fortunes. But although thus able to take his place in the line of those who control the financial operations of the United States, the solid, common sense of Oregonians, the most of whom have worked from the ground up, pays but little respect to wealth apart from character. It is therefore a matter of much congratulation that the man who might, most justly of all, assume the name of “Money King,” has other claims upon their respect and recognition which make his wealth seem but adventitious. He is as one of the plain, hard-working builders of our state, who has been earnest for the social and moral as well as financial progress of the Northwest, that his name appears here. “Woe to that land whose prince is a child.” Equally ill for it when its social and business leaders are men of pleasures and immorality. It has been well for Oregon that her prince on ‘change...

Biography of W. S. Ladd

It is seldom throughout the incipient stages of growth, down to a period covering many years in the development of a progressive commonwealth, that to any one man is accorded a foremost place by general consent. New countries, in these latter days of steam and electricity, develop often with rapidity; new issues are met by new leaders, while those who laid the foundation of society rarely retain their hold on affairs for any extended period of time. In this, however, Oregon has been an exception to the rule, and the career of William Sargent Ladd is a conspicuous example of the exception. Coming to Oregon when the country was young and there was no settled social, political or business order, he has exerted a continually increasing influence in the various lines of development which have added to the wealth and greatness of the State. Apart from his financial operations, which long ago placed him among the most wealthy men of the West, he has been among the builders of our State who have been most earnest for its social and moral progress. The results of his high integrity and of his efforts to elevate the tone of society and keep pure the moral sentiment of the community, make a double claim upon our respect and recognition. Fortunate, indeed, has it been for the State that its business leaders, like our subject, have been men whose social, religious and domestic relations have stimulated and honored the highest of her people. The lessons of such lives are the best inheritance of a State or people. W. S. Ladd was born at...

Biography of Benjamin F. Maxfield

Benjamin F. Maxfield, one of the farmers of Loudon township, was born in Gilmanton, N.H., March 22, 1828, son of Enoch and Sallie (Thompson) Maxfield. The father, a farmer of Gilmanton, was a native of Chichester; and the mother was from Northfield, N.H. Their children were: Oliver, now deceased, who married Sobrina Ann Towle; Benjamin F., the subject of this article; Clearsy, deceased; Laura, also deceased, who became the wife of Cyrus Jones; B. Jennie, who is the wife of Thomas Tate, and now lives in Rockport, Mass.; Charles H., deceased; Hiram, deceased, who successively married Mary E. Flanders and Mary Page, both now deceased; John, who married Affiah Page, and is a farmer in Gilmanton; Rachel, the wife of Abram Burham, a ship-carpenter of Essex, now deceased; Edwin, who married Laura J. Sanborn, and lives in Gilmanton; and Abbie, the youngest, who died at the age of nineteen years. Having received his education in the town schools, Benjamin F. Maxfield at the age of fifteen went to Loudon Ridge, where he engaged in farming for four years. He tried railroading for a short period after this, but returned to town and spent a year on the farm of Deacon Brown. His next employment was on the farm of Mrs. Mary French, which he subsequently bought. Starting as a farm hand, with but thirty-five cents that he could call his own, by the closest economy he was able to put by enough money to buy the farm and become independent for life. He and his wife now own about two hundred acres. In addition to his general farming he...

Biography of Samuel Henry Melcher

Samuel Henry Melcher is the son of Woodbury Melchor, Esq:, and a grandson of Capt. Samuel B. French, was born in Gilmanton, N. H., October 30, 1828. Was educated at Gilford and Gilmanton academies; graduated at medical department, Dartmouth College, in Grafton county, N, H.; then in Boston, Mass., until 1859, when he traveled South and through Texas; and at the close of that year, settled in Potosi, Washington county, Missouri. On the breaking out of the war, he offered his services at once to Gen. Lyon, at St. Louis arsenal; and was mustered in as assistant surgeon 5th Regt. Mo. Vols. (three months), May 7, 1861. Was with his regiment at the battles of Carthage, July 5, 1861; Dug Spring, August 2, 1861; Wilson’s Creek, August 10, 1861, where he was the last officer on the field after the forces fell back, and brought off the body of Gen. Lyon and delivered it to Gen. Schofield the same night, as narrated on other pages of this volume. By order of Gen. Schofield, he remained a prisoner in the hands of the Confederates, to take care of the Union wounded. Was in Springfield when the “Fremont Body Guard” made their terrific charge, and attended the wounded on both sides; was furnished with wagons by Gen. Sigel, and moved the wounded in all that region to Rolla, thence by rail to St. Louis, arriving November 24, 1861, thus ending his first campaign. He was commissioned brigade surgeon December 4, 1861, reporting to Gen. Schofield; and during the spring and summer of 1862, was in charge of the Hickory Street Hospital,...
Page 4 of 41234

Pin It on Pinterest