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Slave Narrative of America Morgan

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: America Morgan Location: Indiana Place of Birth: Ballard County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1852 Place of Residence: 816 Camp Street Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE MRS. AMERICA MORGAN-EX-SLAVE 816 Camp Street America Morgan was born in a log house, daubed with dirt, in Ballard County, Kentucky, in 1852, the daughter of Manda and Jordon Rudd. She remembers very clearly the happenings of her early life. Her mother, Manda Rudd, was owned by Clark Rudd, and the “devil has sure got him.” Her father was owned by Mr. Willingham, who was very kind to his slaves. Jordon became a Rudd, because he was married to Manda on the Rudd plantation. There were six children in the family, and all went well until the death of the mother; Clark Rudd whipped her to death when America was five years old. Six little children were left motherless to face a “frowning world.” America was given to her master’s daughter, Miss Meda, to wait on her, as her personal property. She lived with her for one year, then was sold for $600.00 to Mr. and Mrs. Utterback stayed with them until the end of the Civil war. The new mistress was not so kind. Miss Meda, who knew her reputation, told her if she abused America, she would come for her, and she would loose the $600.00 she had paid for her. Therefore, America was treated very kindly. Aunt Catherine, who looked after all the children on the plantation, was very unruly, no one could whip her....

Recreations of Slaves

Recreations of slaves: The following is an old fashion ballad that was sung during the period of slavery and which was very common throughout the Purchase Region: “Jeff Davis rode a big white horse, but Lincoln rode a mule-Jeff Davis was a fine, smart man, and Lincoln was a fool. Jeff Davis had a fine white; Lincoln only had a mule-Jeff Davis was a wonderful man and Lincoln was a fool”. Ring dancing was largely practiced during the slavery period. Especially was this participated in throughout the Purchase Region. This was a rather primative kind of dancing and was performed mostly by negro children. The general procedure was to draw a ring on the ground, ranging from 15 to 30 feet in diameter. The size of the ring to be used was determined by the number of persons who were engaged in the dancing ring. The youngsters would congregate within the ring and dance to the rhythmic hand clapping and rhythm of the tambourine, which was performed by the white people in the community. Sometimes large congregations witnessed these primitive affairs, and they became a great Saturday evening entertainment for the community at large. During the periods of intermission, the youngsters, who had engaged in the dancing would be given a kind of feast on barbecued meat and cider drinking. At the conclusion of this brief festivity, they would continue in their dancing, and very often this hilarity would be carried on well into the evening. Another kind of entertainment, which was practiced during the period of slavery, was the singing of negro folk songs and spirituals. The darkies...

Slave Narrative of Mrs. Hannah Davidson

Interviewer: K. Osthimer Person Interviewed: Hannah Davidson Location: Toledo, Ohio Place of Birth: Ballard County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1852 Place of Residence: 533 Woodland Avenue, Toledo, Ohio Mrs. Hannah Davidson occupies two rooms in a home at 533 Woodland Avenue, Toledo, Ohio. Born on a plantation in Ballard County, Kentucky, in 1852, she is today a little, white haired old lady. Dark, flashing eyes peer through her spectacles. Always quick to learn, she has taught herself to read. She says, “I could always spell almost everything.” She has eagerly sought education. Much of her ability to read has been gained from attendance in recent years in WPA “opportunity classes” in the city. Today, this warm hearted, quiet little Negro woman ekes out a bare existence on an old age pension of $23.00 a month. It is with regret that she recalls the shadows and sufferings of the past. She says, “It is best not to talk about them. The things that my sister May and I suffered were so terrible that people would not believe them. It is best not to have such things in our memory.” “My father and mother were Isaac and Nancy Meriwether,” she stated. “All the slaves went under the name of my master and mistress, Emmett and Susan Meriwether. I had four sisters and two brothers. There was Adeline, Dorah, Alice, and Lizzie. My brothers were Major and George Meriwether. We lived in a log cabin made of sticks and dirt, you know, logs and dirt stuck in the cracks. We slept on beds made of boards nailed up. “I don’t remember anything...

Biography of J. M. Haworth

J. M. HAWORTH. The locality in which Forsyth is situated is indeed fortunate in having among its citizens such a man as Mr. Haworth is conceded to be, for his connection with the interests of the county, both as a minister of the Gospel, business man and agriculturist, has proven of much benefit and influence. He inherits much of his energy and push from his Irish ancestors, his grandfather having been a native of the Emerald Isle, and having emigrated to the United States at a period antedating the Revolutionary War, in which he served with distinction. He took up land in North Carolina and there passed the remainder of his days. His son, McCogie Haworth, was born in the Old North State in 1797, but left that State with his parents and emigrated to Wilson County, Tennessee From there he subsequently moved to Parke County, Indiana, but later returned to Tennessee, where he remained until 1853, when he came to this county. Here his death occurred in 869. He was a blacksmith and wagon maker by trade and ran a shop in Taney County a number of years. He was also a farmer, owning a good tract of land in this county, the same being now owned by his sons, and he became well off. He selected his wife in the person of Miss Edna Winn, a native of Virginia, born in 1812, and the daughter of both a Revolutionary and War of 1812 soldier. She died in this county in 1872, after having been a lifelong and earnest member of the Missionary Baptist Church. Mr. and Mrs....

Biography of W. H. Puckett

The junior member of the well known law firm of Hawley & Puckett is the gentleman whose name forms the caption of this sketch. He is still a young man, but has attained a position of distinction at the bar that many an older practitioner might well envy. He was born at Herndon Place, Ballard County, Kentucky, on the 8th of August 1869. His father, W. J. Puckett, was a native of Jackson, Mississippi, and became one of the prominent lawyers of Kentucky, where he practiced successfully for a number of years. He is now living retired in Denver, Colorado. In the public schools of his native town W. H. Puckett acquired his preliminary education, which was supplemented by a course in the Baptist College at Blandville, Kentucky. In 1885 he went to Denver, Colorado, and was graduated in the Denver Business College, in 1888. The same year he became a student in the Washington and Lee University, of Lexington, Virginia, where he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Law. The year 1891 witnessed his arrival in Idaho. He secured a position as stenographer in the law office of Hawley & Reever, at Blackfoot, and in 1892 came with them to Boise, where he has since made his home. He continued with the firm until its dissolution, when he joined the senior partner in the establishment of the present firm of Hawley & Puckett. They occupy a commanding position at the bar and enjoy a very liberal share of the legal business in the courts of this locality. Mr. Puckett is thoroughly devoted to his profession, prepares...

Biography of William T. Reeves

William T. Reeves, a prominent lawyer of Idaho, residing at Pocatello, was born at Kinkleville, Kentucky, January 21, 1855, and is of Scotch-Irish ancestry, a combination which everywhere and always produces good citizens and has given to America many of her best and greatest men. George Reeves, Mr. Reeves paternal grandfather, emigrated from Ireland and brought his wife with him. They had four sons and three daughters. William Harrison Reeves, Mr. Reeves’ father, was born in Richmond, Virginia, and married Miss Penelope B. White, a native of Tennessee. While he was a mere boy his father removed with his family to Kentucky, and there he was reared and educated and wooed and won his wife. He died at the age of seventy-eight, she at sixty-one, and their neighbors in Kentucky, among whom they passed their busy and useful lives, bore testimony to their high character and the beneficent quality of the influence they exerted upon the community. William T. Reeves was educated in the common schools and in the college at Blandville, Kentucky. He read law at Blandville, under the direction of an older brother, then established in professional work, and was duly admitted to the bar in 1875. After ten years’ successful practice of his profession in his native state, he took up his residence at Eagle Rock, now Idaho Falls, Idaho, in 1885. Eagle Rock was then a leading railway town, and his success there was encouraging, but inducements were made to him to remove to Blackfoot. After ten years at Blackfoot he was for two years at Boise City. In 1894 he located at Pocatello, where...

Ballard County, Kentucky Census Records

1800 Ballard County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Ballard County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Ballard County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1820 Ballard County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Ballard County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1830 Ballard County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Ballard County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1840 Ballard County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1840 U.S. Census Guide 1850 Ballard County, Kentucky Census Records Hosted at Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1850 Ballard County, Kentucky Census Images $ 1850 Ballard County, Kentucky Slave Schedule $ Hosted at Census Guide 1850 U.S. Census Guide 1860 Ballard County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1860 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1860 Ballard County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1860 U.S. Census Guide 1870 Ballard County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1870 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1870 Ballard County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at...

Buying and Selling Slaves

BALLARD CO. (J.R. Wilkerson) [HW: Ky 7] [Tinie Force and Elvira Lewis:] During the period of slavery in the Purchase Region, buying and selling slaves was carried on at irregular intervals. The trading usually took place at the home of the slave owner. The prices paid for slaves was dependent upon certain conditions. In case of a full grown, robust negro boy the price was sometimes as much as one thousand dollars. The prices paid was varied according to the age, the general health and other conditions of the individual. At times pathetic scenes prevailed in the selling of slaves; namely, the separation of mother and child. Often, a boy or girl would be sold and taken away from his or her mother. In many cases the parting would be permanent and the child and its mother would never see each other again. The slave owner maintained separate housing quarters for his slaves. In some cases the living quarters of slaves was comfortable and agreeable; in other cases, living conditions of slaves was anything but agreeable; Some masters were reasonably gentle to their slaves, while others were cruel. One of the saddest, darkest and most pathetic conditions that existed during the period of slavery was the intimate mingling of slave owners, in fact many white men, with negro women. It has become known that very often a slave was sold who was the direct offspring of his or her owner. This practice prevailed to some extent in the Purchase Region, but was not universal. When the emancipation proclamation became effective and the slaves were given freedom, some of them...

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