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Biography of Jefferson Beauregard Searcy

JEFFERSON BEAUREGARD SEARCY, county clerk of Shannon County, and one of the most popular officials of the county, is a product of Boone County, Missouri, born December 30, 1858, and the son of George N. and Amanda J. (Cochram) Searcy, both natives of Boone County, Missouri In this county the parents were married, and here passed the remainder of their days, dying when comparatively young people, the father in 1865, when thirty-three years of age, and the mother in 1868, when thirty years of age. The grandfather, Lemuel Searcy, was an early settler of Boone County, Missouri, from Kentucky. The Cochram family also came here at an early date, the grandfather, William Cochram, locating here as early as 1812. He was also from Kentucky. The father of our subject was a teacher in Lathrop Academy, and just prior to the war he was in the University at Columbia. He was a graduate of the University of Missouri in 1856 or 1857, and was a man of unusual intelligence. After the death of his parents our subject was taken by an uncle, B. F. Cochram, and by him was reared. In 1876 he went to Boonville and attended Kemper’s School three years, after which he returned to Boone County and attended the State University part of two years. From there he went to Audrain County, Missouri, and after remaining there three years moved to near Eminence, Shannon County, where he operated a mill part of the time. He then went to Winona, where he lived for three years; was in the saw mill business part of the time, and was...

Biography of James Franklin Norton

JAMES FRANKLIN NORTON, merchant and farmer of Eminence, Missouri, is a native of the Blue Grass State, born in Lawrence County, in 1839. His father, David Norton, who was reared in Virginia, moved to Kentucky at an early date and when our subject was but an infant came to Audrain County, Missouri, where he passed his last days. He was a prominent farmer and stockraiser, and while a resident of Audrain County held the office of justice of the peace. Politically he was a Democrat, and fraternally a Mason. His death occurred in 1852 when about forty years of age. His wife, whose maiden name was Emily Davidson, was a native of Virginia. She died in 1859 and was an exemplary member of the Methodist Church. They were the parents of nine children, seven of whom are now living, four sons and three daughters. Our subject, who was one of these children, attended school in Audrain County, and took care of the family until all the children were married. In 1858 he came to Shannon County, where he had previously bought a small farm of government land which he entered at the land office at Jackson, Missouri, and here he found very few settlers. He turned his attention to farming and black smithing, having learned the latter in Audrain County, and followed his trade for the most part for twenty-two years. In June, 1861, he enlisted in the Missouri State Militia, under Gen. McBride, for six months. After that he joined the Confederate Army, but a short time after he was transferred to cavalry service. He was quartermaster of...

Biography of George A. Clark

George A. Clark, now president of the Toneka Title and Bond Company, is a representative of that class of citizen who without special ostentation have been leaders in making Kansas one of the foremost states of the Union. He is a true and typical Kansan by reason of more than thirty-five years of active participation in its life and affairs. In one respect his career had been unusual. The greater part of his life had been passed in newspaper work, ranging in locality from the Mississippi River to the Rocky Mountains, but chiefly in Kansas. This work began as “printer’s devil” on the Southwest News at Hartville, Missouri. There, under the training of a prince of printers, Frank E. Mason, he thoroughly mustered all the details. For a number of years he followed the printing trade, and was a real journeyman, traveling from one office to the other, getting new experience and seeing new country and new peoples and communities. However in one notable respect he was unlike the average journeyman printer–he saved his money and left liquor severely alone. He was publishing a paper at Wellsville in Montgomery County, Missouri, in 1877, when fire destroyed his plant and swept away all his savings. In April, 1878, he came to Kansas and he had since many times congratulated himself on the good fortune which arose phoenix-like out of the burning of his Missouri newspaper plant. For a time he was employed in a job office at Leavenworth and then came to Topeka to act as foreman of the news room and as telegraph editor of the Commonwealth, then the...

Biography of C. F. Reid

C. F. Reid, who has devoted much of his life to public service, is now acceptably filling the office of county treasurer and his thorough reliability and efficiency have won for him the confidence and respect of his fellow townsmen, who have found him faithful to every trust reposed in him. He was born in Bowling Green, Pike county, Missouri, and his parents were Alexander Finley and Anna M. (Blaine) Reid, the former a native of Kentucky, while the latter was born in Missouri. The ancestors of the subject of this review in both the paternal and maternal lines participated in the Revolutionary war and his mother’s people originally settled in Virginia, whence they later removed to Missouri, the first brick hotel in Bowling Green, that state, having been erected by a member of the family. During the infancy of C. F. Reid his parents went to Mexico, Missouri, and there the father passed away in 1902. The mother is still a resident of that city, having reached the advanced age of eighty years. C. F. Reid acquired his education in the grammar and high schools of Mexico, Missouri, and after completing his studies became connected with mercantile interests at Warrenton, that state. He was first called to public office in 1905, serving as deputy sheriff of Warren County, Missouri, until 1907, as treasurer from 1907 until 1913, when he was again chosen deputy sheriff, making a most creditable record in each of these positions. In 1915 he came to Oklahoma, settling at Dewey, where he entered the insurance business, and also acted as notary public. In 1917 he...

Shock, George T. – Obituary

George Shock, Well Known, Dies Sunday Resident of Halfway and 19 years at Haines “Haines–(Special)–George T. Shock, pioneer resident of Baker County, was born January 19, 1854, at Mexico, MO., and came to the San Luis valley, Colorado, at the age of 20 with his parents, brothers and sisters. The family left Missouri in March 1874, with a party of about 29 other families. They crossed the plains in a caravan of covered wagons driving mostly oxen and bringing their stock and equipment with them. They traveled together to guard against Indians and sought homes in different parts of Colorado. The Shock family arrived in the San Luis valley in July, 1874, locating about eight miles northwest of the present city of Alamosa, on the Rio Grande River. At Phelps, MO., on July 24, 1882, he was united in marriage to Mary A. Wallace. They came to Oregon in the year 1891 and resided in Haines and vicinity for 19 years. In the year 1910 they moved to Pine valley where he engaged in farming until the year 1927 when they moved to Halfway where they resided since. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Shock; Hattie Shock, deceased; Mrs. Lizzie Long, Haines; Jesse Shock, Pine; Melvin Shock, Pine. Six grandchildren, Floyd Long, Mrs. Pansy Maxwell, Georgia May Long and Dora Rose Long, Haines; Mrs. Mabel Dinnick, Halfway; and Mrs. Beulah Bowery Kelso, WA. and five great grandchildren. Funeral services were held at the Christian church in Halfway with Rev. Mae Budd officiating. Interment was held at the Haines cemetery Wednesday afternoon.” Source: The Record Courier, Baker City,...

A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri

A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri was written by William Bryan in 1876. William along with his associate, Robert Rose, traversed by horse across five counties in the state of Missouri interviewing families for the information found in this manuscript. As such, readers should not use this as the Gospel for these early Missouri families. Research is warranted to validate what the families claimed, as they were often in error, merely detailing the information passed down to them. Even William acknowledged such in his preface to the book. The five counties included were: Audrain, Callaway, Montgomery, St. Charles and Warren. At the time William wrote this manuscript, Missouri was mostly a rural state. But it had seen its largest influx of new residents in the prior two decades. Details on whom he and Robert chose to be representative of those “pioneer” families was never mentioned. One can only assume that they chose those families which were known to have been early arrivals in Missouri and to still have family in the five counties mentioned earlier. Biographies from A History of the Pioneer Families of Missouri Allen, Charles Anderson, John Anderson, Presley Andrews, William Archer, Charles C. Baker, David Baker, Robert Rev. Barnes, James Bast, George Beard, Edwin Berger, Jacob Best, Stephen Bird, John Bowels, Gideon Brown, William Brown, William Bunch, David W. Burgess, Thomas Bush, William Bushby, Matthew Cain, Jesse Callaway, John B. Camp, Hardin Carnefax, William Carson, Lindsay Carter, Ithiel Carter, Peter Caton, Jesse Chambers, John Chapman, Stephen Clanton, Drury Clanton, Henry Clark, Henry Clements, Benjamin A. Clyce, William Cobb, Samuel Coil, Jacob Col. Cole, Mark...

Biography of Hon. R. S. Strahan

HON. R.S. STRAHAN. – Judge Strahan, as a member of the Oregon supreme court, is widely known as being able and upright, and is universally recognized as one of our most popular representatives of the state judiciary. He was born in Kentucky in 1835. During his childhood he removed with his father to the Platte reserve, as the section was then known, in Missouri, and several years later to Mexico in the same state, living on a farm until he reached manhood, and cultivating the use of brain, brawn and nerve, and cherishing a country-boy’s ambition. The strength and hope thus developed on a farm has served many a man, as well as Judge Strahan, with the impetus which has borne him far into the higher realms of action and society. He obtained all the education to be had at the country school-house, and to this added a brief academic course preparatory to the study of law, in which is tastes inclined him. He entered upon legal studies at Louisa, Kentucky, early in 1856, and completed his course and was admitted to the bar in 1857. Returning to the state which he now called his home, he set up a practice at Milan, Missouri, and met with due success. His abilities became so well known as to attract attention and inspire confidence among the people of the county (Sullivan) and he was appointed probate judge, acting in that capacity four years, and ever discharging the duties of that important position with dignity and to the entire satisfaction of those having business in his court. In 1864 he was led...
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