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Biography of Rev. James T. Dougherty

When De Nonville and his French army, in 1687, destroyed the Indian village of Gannagaro and Gaudougarae, the inhabitants were driven eastward and formed a village near the foot of Canandaigua Lake, which village and lake have since then borne that name. Among the Indian inhabitants in those days were many Catholics, some of them Senecas and most of them Hurons and Algonquin captives, the result of fifty years of missionary labor of the zealous Jesuits. Even in our day the beads and crucifixes given the Indians by the missionaries are still picked up on the sites of the old Indian towns. Following the revolution and the white settlement of western New York, Canandaigua became a prominent center of commerce and government, and no doubt many Catholics were among the pioneers. The family of Hugh Collins came as early as 1823, others followed, and there are traditions of lumber wagons leaving here Saturday afternoons to bring the people to the Sunday mass at St. Patrick’s in Rochester. About 1840 Rev. Bernard O’Reilly, of Rochester, said the first mass in Canandaigua in the Patrick Doyle house on Antis street. Mass was celebrated in various homes for the following few years. At length, in 1844, a lot was purchased by Father O’Reilly from Thomas Beals, and in the fall of 1846 the pew books give the following list of pewholders. On the south side of the church: Bernard Scandling, Bridget Garvey, Hugh Collins, Patrick White, Patrick Doyle, Michael Coyle, Catherine Hanavin, Agnes King, John Whalen, William Lysaght, Eleanor Gannon, James Ryan, Patrick Sherry, Matthew- Carroll, Hugh Keefe, James Gleason, James Cooney,...

Biography of Hugh Cardinal Crawford

President, secretary and manager of the Springfield Tool Company, was born in Stafford, Connecticut, in 1893, the son of Herbert Merrill and Jennie (Cardinal) Crawford. The name of Crawford, represented in the United States and Canada by many men who have been conspicuous in almost every field of human endeavor, is of Scotch origin. wherever found, and although some of the immigrant ancestors of the name came to this country from the North of Ireland, and were of Scotch-Irish descent, the name was derived directly from Scotland. (I) John Crawford was the immigrant ancestor of the branch of the family to which Hugh Cardinal Crawford belongs. He is likewise the ancestor of all the Crawfords who live in Union, Connecticut. Migrating from Scotland to the North of Ireland, he lived there until 1732, when he sailed from Belfast, Ireland, to Boston, Massachusetts, with his wife and four sons. At Sable Island a storm wrecked the vessel on which they were passengers, and Mrs. Crawford was among those who were drowned. (II) Hugh Crawford, son of John Crawford, was nineteen when he arrived in America with the family. He settled in Newton, Massachusetts, and continued to live there until he settled in Union, Connecticut, in 1740, and bought land at his new home. He was a weaver by trade, and on record in 1743 as the owner of extensive lands. He was also a soldier in the Revolutionary War. While the hostile operations were in progress in the summer of 1776 in and around New York City, Samuel Crawford, a son of Hugh Crawford, became ill with camp fever.. His...

Logan Monument, Auburn, New York

From Syracuse, and the Monument to Onondaga Indians, the Mohawks once more headed down the Great Central Trail of the Iroquois to the City of Auburn. There, in the Fort Hill Cemetery, Fort Street, Auburn, the warriors saw the remains of a huge Indian mound in the center of which was a gigantic stone shaft monument erected to a great Cayuga Chief named Logan. Chief Logan, Tah-gah-jute christened Logan, 1725-1780, renowned Cayuga sachem, statesman, orator and warrior. He was born in the Indian village Wasco near here. His memory remains enshrined in the Finger Lakes Country as the friend of the white man. In 1852, almost three quarters of a century after his death, there rose in the ancient Indian fortress, now Fort Hill Cemetery, a great stone shaft in his memory – a monument of esteem reared with the free will gifts of Auburnians to an Indian of whom Judge William Brown, of Pennsylvania once said. “He was the best specimen of humanity I have ever met with either white or red.” Knowing of the history of this great chief; the Mohawks were silent as they left the stone memorial and journeyed west. They knew that in a few days they would see another monument erected to this same Chief Logan, a monument erected in the State of Ohio. A short drive brought the warriors to the northern end of Cayuga Lake. Traveling down the old Cayuga Trail that followed the lake south, the warriors visited the site of Cayuga Castle, the ancient Capitol village of the Cayuga Nation. This ancient village site lies on the east side...

Logan Elm And Monument, Circleville, Ohio

Logan, Chief of the Mingoes, was a Cayuga Indian, born at Auburn, New York in 1726. He was the son of Chief Shikellamy, deputy of the Six Nations over the Indians at a section of Pennsylvania. Like his father, Logan was a firm friend of the white man. Upon moving to Ohio, Logan was made chief of the mingoes. During the year 1774 a band of adventurers and “land grabbers” under the leadership of a Captain Michael Cresap and Daniel Greathouse, who were encouraged by a Dr. John Connolly, said to have been under the hire of Governor Dunmore, of Virginia, declared war on all Indians. Dunmore wished an Indian war as an excuse to drive the Shawnees and other Indians from their lands which Dunmore and the rest of the Virginian land speculators coveted. These border ruffians first killed two unsuspecting Indians who were traveling down the Ohio River with some traders. They then attacked and killed some other peaceful Indians who were camped on Cantina Creek. After these murders had been completed, the Virginians marched to Yellow Creek where they knew Logan’s family were living. At dawn, April 30th, the white men entered the Indian camp. They invited the Indians to go to a tavern nearby, promising them rum. Logan, at the time was away on a hunting trip. The Indians accepted the invitation. At the tavern they were fed liquor until all but three were drunk. These three remained sober as it was customary among Indians for some to remain sober in order to take care of their intoxicated companions. One of the sober Indians was...
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