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Biography of Dawson W. Cooley

Dawson W. Cooley is president of the Oxford Bank in Sumner County. His home has been in Kansas for upwards of half a century, and while his years have been chiefly employed in the banking business, he has also identified himself with various other enterprises for the good and upbuilding of this state. Mr. Cooley is one of the surviving veterans of the great Union army during the Civil war. He served during the first two years of that struggle in one of the noted regiments of New York State. His enlistment was in Company C of the Ninth New York Volunteer Infantry, known as the Hawkins Zouaves. It was a two-year regiment, and its arduous service was indicated by mention of the more prominent battles in which it was engaged, as follows: Big Bethel, Virginia, the capture of Hatteras on Roanoke Island, Elizabeth City, Newbern, Camden, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg and Suffolk. Mr. Cooley was with his regiment in all these movements and campaigns, and at the expiration of his enlistment returned home and for a short time was in the employ of the Erie Railway Company. He then went to Nashville, Tennessee, and was in the military railroad service of the Federal Government until the close of the war. He was born on a farm near Attica in Wyoming County, New York, August 11, 1839, being the oldest of the five children of John B. Weltha A. (Winchester) Cooley. His parents were also natives of New York State. His grandfather, Grove Cooley, came from Connecticut into eastern New York and later removed to the western part of...

Biography of Capt. J. H. McMillen

CAPT. J.H. McMILLEN. – Captain McMillen, a fitting example of the men whose stout courage, tireless energy and ready friendliness laid the groundwork of our state, is a pioneer of 1845, having crossed the plains with W.H. Rector, Colonel Taylor, Hiram Smith and others of that large immigration. Of Scotch ancestry, he traces his American lineage to a great-grandfather who crossed the Atlantic and settled in Rhode Island, where a numerous family grew up around him. The grandfather, James, pushed westward as far as New York; and in that state Joseph, the father, was born. Arriving at maturity he married Miss Ruth Gannett and settled in Attica, New York; and in that village James H., whose life we here record, was born May 10, 1823. During the very early life of this child, a further removal was made to Lodi, now Gowanda; and in 1836, when James was coming to be a stout, active lad, a further move to the prairies was effected. It was at Orange, Du Page county, Illinois, that the new home was made and a new farm opened. Aside from his agricultural pursuits, the father was a millwright; and the son learned that trade as his reliance for future support; and it has ever served him most opportunely and honorably. It was a foregone conclusion that the migratory life should not end with the third American generation; and in 1845 James H., now a stocky, powerful and skillful man of twenty-two, undertook the crossing of the plains to Oregon. Upon the advice of William Card, one of the organizers of the company, he did not...

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