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Sinclair Genealogy of Bluehill, Maine

Edward Sinclair was born June 20, 1760, supposed at Beverly, where he died while on a visit May 19, 1827, aged sixty-seven years. He married Dec. 17, 1789, Mary Carleton, from Andover, a sister of David, Dudley, Edward and Moses Carleton. She was born Sept. 17, 1760, and died Jan. 1, 1841, aged 80 years and 4½ months. The family of Edward Sinclair, Sr. consisted of the following children: Maria, Edward, Nabby, Dudley, Ebenezer and William.

Business Men of Northern Maine

The Northern Maine, its Points of Interest and its Representative Business Men manuscript provides historical sketches of the nine towns featured within it’s embrace, as well as biographical sketches of the businesses and the men and women who owned and ran those businesses found within the towns of Houlton, Presque Isle, Caribou, Ft. Fairfield, Danforth, Lincoln, Mattawamkeag, Winn, and Kingman.

Biography of C. K. Merriam, M.D.

C.K. MERRIAM, M.D. – Mr. Merriam was born June 29, 1848, in Houlton, Aroostook County, Maine, being the eighth child in a family of ten children, the third and fourth being girls. His father, Lewis Merriam, when a young man, went from New Salem, Massachusetts, to Maine, in 1832, and married and settled in Houlton in 1833. He is now eighty-two years old, and is coming West this summer. The parents were poor, and lived on a farm two miles from the village. In early childhood he was taught to pick wool, quill yarn, etc., as the wool of the farm was manufactured into garments in the family mill, the motive power of which was supplied principally by his mother; and with boyish impatience he watched his father make his first pair of shoes by candle light. If a book, slate, or pocket money for a Fourth of July celebration were needed, the wild strawberry patch frequently contributed the means. If a handsled, cart or miniature mill were desired, it was found in the workshop over the woodshed after a few days’ work with the lumber and tools; while the yearly sugar camp in the maple grove furnished amusement for the boys as well as syrup for the family. The farm was sold; and the family moved about two miles to a sawmill which the father built on the north branch of the Meduxnekeag, where they remained a short time, until the mill was sold to the oldest son in 1861. The family move again to a farm having an old up-and-down sawmill in Hayesville, Maine, about twenty-five miles...

Biography of Dan Feour

Among the sons of the Pine Tree state who have found homes in the northwest and whose history forms an integral part of the record of the development of the rich mining interests of southern Idaho is Dan Feour. He was born in Aroostook County, Maine, June 9, 1850, a son of William and Catherine Feour. His father was born in Ireland, and when a young man came to the United States. He died in the fiftyfourth year of his age, and his wife departed this life at the age of fortyfour years. They were the parents of five children, four of whom are yet living. Dan Feour was reared to manhood in Boston, Massachusetts, and acquired a good practical education in the public schools of that city. He then learned the machinist’s trade, and for some time worked in the Grover & Baker sewing machine factory. In 1865 he cast in his lot with the settlers on the Pacific coast, and has borne no unimportant part in the development of this section of the country. By way of the isthmus of Panama he made his way to California and there engaged in mining until 1869, when he went to White Pine, Nevada, and thence to the Squaw creek, Washington, and Victoria, British Columbia, attracted by the discovery of gold at those places. In 1875 Mr. Feour arrived in Owyhee County, where he has since engaged in mining, meeting with excellent success in his undertakings. He has also prospected in other parts of the state, and prosperity has attended his labors. In 1879 he sold the St. John mine...

Biography of Benjamin Frank Allen

The subject of this sketch is among the early settlers of Riverside, and ranks as one of the successful horticulturists of the colony. Mr. Allen is a native of New England, dating his birth in Aroostook County, Maine, in 1844. His parents were John and Joanna (Ramsdell) Allen, both natives of that State. His father was one of the pioneers of that section and one of the wealthiest agriculturists in the county. He died in Riverside in 1886, at the advanced age of eighty-seven years. Mr. Allen was reared to farm life and given the benefits of a common-school education. Soon after reaching his majority he established himself on a farm of his own and engaged in that occupation until 1869. In that year he came to California and located in San Mateo County, where he was engaged for a year or more as a stage driver between Redwood City and Searsville. He then returned to Maine and entered into mercantile pursuits at Presque Isle, in his native county. Ill-health and financial difficulties compelled a suspension of his business, and in 1876 he again sought the Pacific coast. This time he came broken in health and with limited means. Upon his arrival he located in Riverside and entered upon horticultural pursuits upon a rented place, but sickness caused him to abandon that enterprise and seek other means of support, and in 1878 he established a laundry, the first ever opened in Riverside. He also built him a cottage residence on Ninth Street, between Vine and Mulberry streets, and engaged in horticultural pursuits upon that block. In 1880 he sold...

Biography of Clement Adams Bradbury

CLEMENT ADAMS BRADBURY. – Of all the romantic and adventurous ways in which the early settlers found their way to Oregon, this now venerable pioneer may perhaps claim a manner as exciting as any, – that of a world-wide career on the ocean, and, finally, shipwreck. He was born in York county, Maine, March 18, 1819. As a boy he learned to labor, belonging to one of those hardy New England families whose lot was cast in a forest country, and in hard times. But by this very discipline young Clement acquired strength of body and of mind, independence, self-reliance and energy. At the age of thirteen he went to a new home in Aroostook county, in the midst of the deep pine woods. At the age of twenty-five, – now a brawny, fearless, and ambitious young man, – he went to sea, following the example of the many wonderfully hardy young New Englanders, who learned how to chase the sea monsters at either of the Polar circles. Off on a whaler he went to the South seas, fishing on the St. Paul ground. Crossing the equator and dipping in the northern waters, he was at Petropaulovski, and down to the station at the Sandwich Islands. The ship also went down to Syndey in Australia; and here, in company with another young man, Bradbury left the whaler, passing some time on the great Southern island and encountering a host of serious and comic adventures. Shipping however on another whaler, he took a second cruise north, arriving in Behring Sea some time in June, when all those Arctic waters were...

Allen, Norman “Norm” – Obituary

Norman “Norm” Allen, 86, of Baker City died Feb. 19, 2006, at Settler’s Park. At his request, there will be no service. In the spring his family will gather privately to celebrate his life and to scatter his ashes with his beloved wife’s. Norm was born on Jan. 26, 1920, at Smyrna Mills, Maine, to Thomas and Delia Allen. He was the 13th of 13 children. He attended school at Smyrna Mills and after graduating from high school enlisted in the U.S. Air Force. He was stationed in Idaho and Washington. While in Idaho he met his life’s partner, Yvonne Love. They were married at Boise on June 21, 1942. After World War II and completion of his enlistment, he and Yvonne lived for a short time at Cambridge, Idaho, where he partnered with Yvonne’s brother, Archie Love, and started the Cambridge Telephone Co. They later moved to Smyrna Mills, but both missed the West terribly and moved back, settling at Boise. Norm went to work for Garrett Freightlines where he was employed for 22 years. Norm loved the mountains. He and Yvonne owned a cabin at Atlanta, Idaho, at the foot of the Sawtooth Mountains where, over the years, they spent many weekends and vacations. He loved hiking up to the high mountain streams and fishing with his family. In the fall of 1968 they sold their home at Boise and bought the Log Cabin Cafe at Sumpter. They found their heart’s “home” at Sumpter. They ran the Log Cabin Cafe for several years before retiring. At that time they pursued their hobby of placer mining, having several...

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