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The Discovery Of This Continent, it’s Results To The Natives

In the year 1470, there lived in Lisbon, a town in Portugal, a man by the name of Christopher Columbus, who there married Dona Felipa, the daughter of Bartolome Monis De Palestrello, an Italian (then deceased), who had arisen to great celebrity as a navigator. Dona Felipa was the idol of her doting father, and often accompanied him in his many voyages, in which she soon equally shared with him his love of adventure, and thus became to him a treasure indeed not only as a companion but as a helper; for she drew his mapsĀ and geographical charts, and also wrote, at his dictation, his journals concerning his voyages. Shortly after the marriage of Columbus and Felipa at Lisbon, they moved to the island of Porto Santo which her father had colonized and was governor at the time of his death, and settled on a large landed estate which belonged to Palestrello, and which he had bequeathed to Felipa together with all his journals and papers. In that home of retirement and peace the young husband and wife lived in connubial bliss for many years. How could it be otherwise, since each had found in the other a congenial spirit, full of adventurous explorations, but which all others regarded as visionary follies? They read together and talked over the journals and papers of Bartolomeo, during which Felipa also entertained Columbus with accounts of her own voyages with her father, together with his opinions and those of other navigators of that age his friends and companions of a possible country that might be discovered in the distant West, and the...

Slave Narrative of Page Harris

Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: Page Harris Location: Camp Parole, Maryland Place of Birth: Charles County MD Date of Birth: 1858 Place of Residence: Campe Parole, A. A. C. Co., MD Reference: Personal interview with Page Harris at his home, Camp Parole, A.A.C. Co., Md. “I was born in 1858 about 3 miles west of Chicamuxen near the Potomac River in Charles County on the farm of Burton Stafford, better known as Blood Hound Manor. This name was applied because Mr. Stafford raised and trained blood hounds to track runaway slaves and to sell to slaveholders of Maryland, Virginia and other southern states as far south as Mississippi and Louisiana. “My father’s name was Sam and mother’s Mary, both of whom belonged to the Staffords and were reared in Charles County. They reared a family of nine children, I being the oldest and the only one born a slave, the rest free. I think it was in 1859 or it might be 1860 when the Staffords liberated my parents, not because he believed in the freedom of slaves but because of saving the lives of his entire family. “Mrs. Stafford came from Prince William County, Virginia, a county on the west side of the Potomac River in Virginia. Mr. and Mrs. Stafford had a large rowboat that they used on the Potomac as a fishing and oyster boat as well as a transportation boat across the Potomac River to Quantico, a small town in Prince William County, Va., and up Quantico Creek in the same county. “I have been told by my parents and also by Joshua Stafford, the oldest...

Slave Narrative of Caroline Hammond

Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: Caroline Hammond Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: Anne Arundel County MD Date of Birth: 1844 Place of Residence: 4710 Road, Baltimore, MD Interview at her home, 4710 Falls Road, Baltimore, Md. “I was born in Anne Arundel County near Davidsonville about 3 miles from South River in the year 1844. The daughter of a free man and a slave woman, who was owned by Thomas Davidson, a slave owner and farmer of Anne Arundel. He had a large farm and about 25 slaves on his farm all of whom lived in small huts with the exception of several of the household help who ate and slept in the manor house. My mother being one of the household slaves, enjoyed certain privileges that the farm slaves did not. She was the head cook of Mr. Davidson’s household. “Mr. Davidson and his family were considered people of high social standing in Annapolis and the people in the county. Mr. Davidson entertained on a large scale, especially many of the officers of the Naval Academy at Annapolis and his friends from Baltimore. Mrs. Davidson’s dishes were considered the finest, and to receive an invitation from the Davidsons meant that you would enjoy Maryland’s finest terrapin and chicken besides the best wine and champagne on the market. “All of the cooking was supervised by mother, and the table was waited on by Uncle Billie, dressed in a uniform, decorated with brass buttons, braid and a fancy Test, his hands incased in white gloves. I can see him now, standing at the door, after he had rung the bell....

Slave Narrative of James Wiggins

Person Interviewed: James Wiggins Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: Anne Arundel County MD Date of Birth: 1850-1851 Place of Residence: 625 Barre St. Reference: Personal interview with James Wiggins, ex-slave, at his home, 625 Barre St. “I was born in Anne Arundel County, on a farm near West River about 1850 or 1851, I do not know which. I do not know my father or mother. Peter Brooks, one of the oldest colored men in the county, told me that my father’s name was Wiggins. He said that he was one of the Revells’ slaves. He acquired my father at an auction sale held in Baltimore at a high price from a trader who had an office on Pratt Street about 1845. He was given a wife by Mr. Revell and as a result of this union I was born. My father was a carpenter by trade, he was hired out to different farmers by Mr. Revell to repair and build barns, fences and houses. I have been told that my father could read and write. Once he was charged with writing passes for some slaves in the county, as a result of this he was given 15 lashes by the sheriff of the county, immediately afterwards he ran away, went to Philadelphia, where he died while working to save money to purchase mother’s freedom, through a white Baptist minister in Baltimore. “I was called “Gingerbread” by the Revells. They reared me until I reached the age of about nine or ten years old. My duty was to put logs on the fireplaces in the Revells’ house and...

Biography of John R. Caulk, M. D.

Dr. John R. Caulk, urological surgeon of St. Louis, was born at McDaniel, Talbot county, Maryland, October 30, 1882, a son of the late Frank E. and Sarah D. (Wrightson) Caulk. The father was a representative of a prominent Maryland family of Scotch and English lineage and engaged in business as a wholesale tobacconist, winning substantial success. He died in 1894 at the age of forty-one years, while his wife passed away in 1912 at the age of fifty-two. She was also a representative of one of the old Maryland families of English lineage founded in the new world prior to the Revolutionary war. By her marriage she became the mother of four children, one of whom, a daughter, died in childhood. Dr. Caulk, the eldest of the family, was educated in the primary and high schools of Easton, Talbot county, Maryland, and in St. John’s College at Annapolis, a military school, where in his senior year he was commanding officer, holding the rank of major of the battalion. There he was graduated with the degree of A. B. in 1901, while in 1912 his alma mater conferred upon him the Master of Arts degree. His medical education was obtained in the Johns Hopkins University, from which he was graduated in 1906, subsequent to which time he served for eighteen months as an interne in the Union Protestant Infirmary. He acted as assistant resident surgeon in the same institution under Dr. John M. T. Finney and from 1907 until the middle of 1910 was assistant resident surgeon and resident urological surgeon at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, with which he...

Biographical Sketch of J.H. Tripp, M.D.

J. H. Tripp, M. D., of Marble Hill, was born March 18, 1843, in Lincoln County, Tennessee, and is one of a family of seven children born to Henry and Nancy (Gattis) Tripp, both natives of North Carolina. They were married in Lincoln County, Tennessee, and the father followed agricultural pursuits until his death in 1846 or 1847. The mother is still living in Lincoln County. Our subject remained and assisted his mother on the farm until the breaking out of the late war, when he enlisted in the Forty-fourth Tennessee Infantry, and remained with this until the surrender at Appomattox Court House. He then returned home and engaged in farming for several years, and also secured a limited education by attending common schools for about fifteen months. He attended the Washington Medical College at Baltimore, Maryland, session of 1870-71, and then practiced at Marble Hill till 1876, after which he attended Medical College at Louisville, Kentucky. Here he graduated and resumed his practice at Marble Hill till the session of I884-85 of the medical department of the University of Tennessee, at which place he also graduated, and has since continued the practice of his profession at his home in this county. August 22, 1876, he married Sally A. Bean, to which union one child was born, Myrtle. The Doctor and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal...

Biography of Edmund P. Melson

The magnificent structure owned by the Missouri State Life Insurance Company is the tangible evidence of the business ability and organizing powers of Edmund P. Melson, who established the corporation that finds its concrete embodiment in a building which is an adornment to St. Louis. He was for many years identified with insurance interests, his work finding its culmination in the organization and direction of what is today one of the strong and reliable insurance companies of the United States. Mr. Melson is one of Missouri’s native sons, his birth having occurred in Rails county, October 29, 1866, and be was one of a family of nine children. He is descended from Scotch ancestry, the family having been founded in the new world by Thomas Melson, who came across the Atlantic from the land of hills and heather in 1776 the year which marked the opening of the Revolutionary war. He joined the colonial forces, imbued with the love of freedom, and served in the army of Washington with great distinction, rising to the rank of captain. Samuel J. Melson, father of Edmund P. Melson, was born in Bedford county, Virginia, and in 1857 removed to Missouri but at present writing lives in Jacksonville, Florida. While in Missouri he took an active part in public affairs, served as sheriff and collector of Rails county for four years and was chosen as the representative of his district in the thirty-fifth general assembly. He married Sarah D. Pendleton, daughter of Pressley B. Pendleton, of Rails county, Missouri, who was born near Lexington, Kentucky. The Pendletons came from England in the early...

Biographical Sketch of Franklin Buchanan Owen

Owen, Franklin Buchanan; insurance; born, Talbot County, Md., Sept. 27, 1882; son of William Tilghman and Mary Tilghman Buchanan Owen; educated, public schools of Talbot County, Md., St. John’s College, Annapolis, Md., University of Maryland, School of Law, Baltimore, Md.; first lieut. Maryland National Guard; resigned in 1904; in November, 1897, entered the employ of Messrs. Lawford & McKim, general insurance agts. and brokers, of Baltimore; remained there until April, 1899; resigned to accept a position with the American Bonding Co. of Baltimore; was with that Company in various positions, until Dec. 31, 1906, resigning as sec’y and treas., to become mgr. of Baltimore branch of The American Surety Company of New York; resigned, and came to Cleveland, Jan. 31, 1909, and entered the employ of the late E. Shriver Reese, then gen. agt. of the Fidelity & Deposit Company of Maryland; member firm of Resse, Owen, Clark Agency, Suretyship and insurance; resident vice pres. Fidelity & Deposit Company of Maryland; member Society of Colonial Wars, Sons of American Revolution, and United Sons of Confederate Veterans; member Union, Tavern; Mayfield Country, Athletic, City and Church Clubs; member executive committee National Association of Casualty and Surety Agents; member executive committee Cleveland Board of Surety...

Biography of Peter Rainsford Brady

Among the early pioneers of Arizona, none bore a more prominent part in its development than Peter Rainsford Brady. He came, on his paternal side, from good old Irish stock. His mother, Anna Rainsford, was from Virginia. He was born in Georgetown, District of Columbia, August 4th, 1825; received his education, in part, at the Georgetown College, later entering the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland, from which he was graduated about the year 1&44. After cruising around the Mediterranean Sea in the United States vessel “Plymouth,” he resigned from the navy, and left his home October 26th, 1846, for San Antonio, Texas, where he enlisted as a Lieutenant in the Texas Hangers, and served with distinction in the Mexican “War. After the war Mr. Brady joined a surveying party under Colonel Andrew B. Gray, who made a survey from Marshall, Texas, to El Paso; thence across the country to Tubac and from the latter point made branch surveys, one to Port Lobos on the Gulf of California, and the other to Fort Yuma and San Diego. Mr. Brady served as a captain on this expedition, and was prominent in many Indian fights. When the work was completed, the company disbanded at San Francisco. Mr. Brady was of an adventurous spirit, and in his younger life preferred the wilderness to the smooth paths of civilization. In 1854 he came to Arizona and settled in Tucson, in which place he resided for many years, bearing his part as a good citizen in those exciting times. After the organization of the Territory, he held several public offices, and was sheriff for two...

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