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Biography of Marcus A. Low

No intelligent resident of Kansas would dispute the assertion that in Marcus A. Low, of Topeka, is found one of the really big men of the state. He is a man of many achievements. His ability in the law had led to distinguished position with great corporations; his ranching and developing of oil and gas properties have been conducted on so large a scale as seemingly might have been weighty enough interests to engage the ordinary man; his political foresight and intnition have caused his selection for public office as high as he would accept, but not upon these evidences of keen foresight and broad vision rests Mr. Low’s most enduring fame. It is as a railroad builder he will be recalled by the people of Kansas who have so proflted through his tireless energy. Marcus A. Low was born August 1, 1842, in the State of Maine. When four years old his parents, Frederick P. and Mary J. (Robinson) Low, moved to Belvidere, Boone County, Illinois, where the father engaged in farming and other occupations. In 1869 the family moved to Hamilton, Missouri, and that place continued to be the home of the parents during the remainder of their lives. In the public schools of Belvidere Marcus A. Low continued until he was fifteen years of age, at which time he entered the academy at Auburn, Maine, with the intention of completing the academic course. He fell ill, however, and returned to Illinois. From there, in 1863, he started for California, and after reaching Folsom City became principal of the schools there, about this time beginning the study...

Biography of John W. Daniels

The public-school system of Boise is a monument to the character and labors of Professor John W. Daniels. There is no nobler profession to which man may devote his energies than that of the teacher. What man prominent in public life does not attribute his success in a considerable measure to the influence of some teacher whose instruction he enjoyed in youth? The thoughts implanted in the young minds grow and develop, and largely shape the destinies of those by whom they have been received. It is therefore of the utmost importance that the training of the young shall be entrusted to those who have a just appreciation of the responsibilities that rest upon them, who realize the value of physical, mental and moral development, who can instruct the children how best to use their powers, and, while promoting intellectual activity, neglect not to sow the seeds of character that will produce high ideals of manhood and womanhood. Such is the mission of the teacher, and such has been the life work of John W. Daniels. Professor Daniels was born in England, on the 1st of January, 1846, and when five years of age was brought to America by his parents, Thomas and Margaret (Sullivan) Daniels, who crossed the Atlantic with their five children, and located near Boston, Massachusetts. The father had learned the dyer’s trade in England and had become very proficient in that line of work, which he successfully followed during his residence in this country. He departed this life in the sixty-third year of his age, his wife having died ten years previously. Their son, John...

Biography of C. B. Mitchell

Although one of the more recent additions to the Miami bar, Charles B. Mitchell has already demonstrated his ability to cope with the intricacies of the law and is building up a good practice. He is also well known as a writer of ability and has contributed many interesting articles to leading magazines. He was born at Brunswick, Maine, on the 9th of October, 1870, his parents being George E. and Agnes E. Mitchell, also natives of the Pine Tree state, the former born at Brunswick, August 3, 1850, while the birth of the latter occurred at Oldtown in 1854. The father was employed in various shoe factories in Maine and is now living at Lewiston; that state, but the mother passed away in 1890. C. B. Mitchell was accorded limited educational opportunities, attending the public schools of his native city to the age of eighteen years, and working part time in a shoe factory from the age of twelve years. For a time after leaving school he was a reporter on the Lewiston (Me.) Gazette and then read law in the office of Hon. J. W. Mitchell at Auburn, that state, being admitted to practice in 1892. Three years later he became private secretary to James F. McElroy, of Albany, New York, a construction engineer with a national reputation in 1899 he entered Princeton (N. J.) Theological Seminary to prepare for the Presbyterian ministry, being ordained in 1900. During the next ten years he filled pastorates in New York and New Jersey, working during three years of that time in the east side missions of New York city,...

Biography of Albert A. Newman

Albert A. Newman has been a resident of Kansas since 1868. It is almost a half century of purposeful and earnest citizenship and business activity. Though his first home in the state was at Emporia, Mr. Newman had been principally identified with Arkansas City since 1870. Among all his contemporaries it is conceded that his had been the chief constructive enterprise and influence for the upbuilding and development of that fine city of Southern Kansas. The town was not in existence until the spring of 1870, and it was his foresight and keen judgment, backed up by untiring energy, that realized and utilized the splendid natural resources and advantages of a city eligibly placed upon a great natural water course and for years one of the gateways into the Indian country south of the Kansas line. Many will account for Mr. Newman’s striking business success by referring to the fact that he was born in the Pine Tree State, a state which had furnished as many sturdy citizens as it had been notable for its sturdy and towering forests of pine timber. He had behind him several generations of high minded and patriotic American citizens. Mr. Newman was born at Weld, Maine, January 19, 1843. His grandfather, Ebenezer Newman, was born at Billerica, Massachusetts, in 1791, and was the son of a soldier who fought for the cause of the Revolution with the Massachusetts troops. The Newmans were originally English people and were colonial settlers in Massachusetts. Ebenezer Newman was a farmer by occupation, spent many years at Weld, Maine, and was a frequent summer resident at Stillwater, Minnesota,...

Arosaguntacook Tribe

Arosaguntacook Indians: A tribe of the Abnaki confederacy, formerly living in Androscoggin County, Maine. Their village, which bore the same name, was on Androscoggin River, probably near Lewiston. The various names used indiscriminately for the tribe and the river may be resolved into the forms Ammoscoggin and Arosaguntacook, which have received different interpretations, all seeming to refer to the presence of fish in the stream . The name seems to have been used only for the part of the river in Androscoggin County between the falls near Jay and those near Lewiston. The present name was obtained by changing the first part of the word to Andros in compliment to Gov. Andros. The Arosaguntacook lived on the edge of the first English settlements in Maine, and consequently suffered much in the various Indian wars, in which they took a prominent part from 1675 until their removal to Canada. Their town was burned by the English in 1690. As the settlements pushed into the interior the Wawenoc, at the mouth of the river, moved up and joined the Arosaguntacook, and at a later period the combined tribes moved still farther up and joined the Rocameca. These movements led to much confusion in the statements of writers, as the united tribes were commonly known by the name of the leading one, the Arosaguntacook or Androscoggin. These tribes, together with the Pigwacket, removed to St. Francis, Canada, soon after the defeat of the Pequawket by Lovewell in 1725. Here the Arosaguntacook were still the principal tribe and their dialect (Abnaki) was adopted by all the inhabitants of the village, who were frequently...

Biography of John E. Cutter

John E. Cutter, of the firm of Twogood & Cutter, nurserymen, Riverside, was born in Webster, Androscoggin County, Maine, in 1844. His parents were Dr. Benoni Cutter, born in New Hampshire, and Olive S. (Drinkswater) Cutter, a native of Maine. The death of his mother occurred in 1847, and of his father in 1851; and he was then reared under the care of his grandfather and stepmother. His boyhood and youth were spent upon the farm and in the schools. In 1862 he entered the military service of his country as a private of the Twenty-third Regiment of Maine Volunteers, and served for nine months in the defense of Washington. He was honorably discharged at the expiration of his term of enlistment, re-enlisted in the Twenty-ninth Volunteer Infantry, and shared in all its campaigns and battles. After hard service he was promoted to be Corporal, and then Sergeant. His regiment was assigned to duty in the Nineteenth Army Corps in the Department of the Gulf, and took part in the Red River campaign, and, with the Twenty-ninth Wisconsin, built the dam at Alexandria that saved Admiral Porter’s fleet. The regiment (with most of the corps) was then ordered north and joined General Phil. Sheridan’s army in the Shenandoah valley and participated in the battles of Opequan, Fisher’s Hill and Cedar creek. Mr. Cutter remained in the service until the close of the war, and after his discharge returned to Maine. He then entered the Wesleyan Seminary and Female College at Kent’s Hill, and spent two years in study in that institution. After graduating he engaged as a teacher in...

Biography of Dr. Clark W. Sylvester

Dr. Clark W. Sylvester, one of Riverside’s wealthy and most esteemed citizens, was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, in 1850, son of Sewell and Mary J. (Foster) Sylvester, both natives of Maine. The father was an iron founder by trade, and although a hard-working man, with nothing but his daily labor to depend upon for the maintenance of his family, he was possessed with the innate sense of honor and the principles of a gentleman. He toiled assiduously and took upon himself liabilities to give a good education to his son, who, during vacations, worked respectively in a grocery, paint shop, machine shop and iron foundry, and even during his terms of study often supported himself by such work as he could find to do during spare hours. His college course he never quite finished, for at the age of twenty-one he became imbued with the conviction that the expenses attendant upon his course of studies and his graduation was more than his father, whose health had recently suffered, could bear, and that his father, in reality, was more in need of assistance than able to give it. Dr. Sylvester being a youth of studious habits and of an ambitious disposition, mastered the leading branches of study in the high schools of North and South Andover, Massachusetts, then entered the Maine State Academy, in Lewiston, Maine, after which he passed through, a course of study in the Nichols Latin School and Lewiston, Maine, and then graduated from the New Hampton Institute, New Hampton, New Hampshire, and prepared himself for Dartmouth College, but being unable to carry out this design he...

Biography of George W. Garcelon

George W. Garcelon is one of Riverside’s pioneer settlers, and ranks among the leading practical horticulturists of the county. He was born in New Brunswick, in 1832, and reared and schooled in his native place until twenty years of age. In starting in life on his own account he decided to establish himself in the United States. In 1852 he located in Lewiston, Maine, and was there employed as clerk in the drag business. His close attention and studies enabled him to master his calling, and lie became skilled as a druggist and chemist, and in 1856 he established himself in business as a druggist in that city. He married in that city, in 1858, Miss Mary Tobie, daughter of Edward P. Tobie, a well-known citizen of Lewiston, who for more than thirty years held the position of town and city clerk. Mr. Garcelon was successful in his business pursuits, and conducted them until 1872. In that year he sought a home in California, and located at Riverside. Soon after his arrival he purchased a two-and-one-half acre block between Vine and Mulberry and Sixth and Seventh streets and entered upon horticultural pursuits. He also purchased a twenty-acre tract on Brockton Avenue, at the corner of Bandini Avenue. Mr. Garcelon entered heartily into his new calling, growing his own nursery stock and planting citrus and deciduous trees. His experience was that of all pioneers in the fruit growing of Riverside. Many of his deciduous trees in later years were uprooted and replaced by orange and lemon trees. He now has one of the finest groves in the colony. He also...

Biography of Whitman Howard Jordan

Whitman Howard Jordan, director of the New York Agricultural Experiment Station. at Geneva, Ontario county, New York, since 1896, is most thoroughly conversant with every detail of the important work entrusted to his care. His life has always been an active one, and he is one of those restless, energetic men whose whole lives are an incessant battle to overcome problems the solution of which will be of inestimable benefit to the great cause of humanity. James Jordan, father of Whitman H. Jordan, was horn in Raymond, Maine, January 3, 1806. The active years of his life were spent in the pursuit of agriculture, in which he was eminently successful. His religious affiliations were with the Free Baptist denomination, and his political support was given to the Republican party. He married Sarah Symonds, who was born in Raymond, Maine, April 6, 1809. Whitman Howard, son of James and Sarah (Symonds) Jordan, was born in Raymond, Maine, October 27, 1851. His elementary education was obtained in the rural district school and he then attended the Nichols’ Latin School, in Lewiston, Maine. Subsequently he was a student at the University of Maine, which conferred upon him the degree of Bachelor of Science. He was then engaged for some time with graduate work at Cornell University. Later the University of Maine conferred upon him the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Science, and the Michigan Agricultural College bestowed that of Doctor of Laws. He was his father’s assistant on the farm until he entered college at the age of twenty years and in this manner gained a practical knowledge of...
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