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Descendants of Richard Kimball of Ipswich MA

KIMBALL. Richard Kimball, of the parish of Rattlesden, County of Suffolk, England, with his family, came to New England in the ship “Elizabeth” in 1634, arriving at Boston, and thence went to Watertown, Mass. He soon became a prominent and active man in the new settlement, was proclaimed a freeman in 1635, and was proprietor in 1636-37. Soon thereafter he removed to Ipswich, where he passed the remainder of his life. His services as a wheelwright were very much appreciated. Mr. Kimball married Ursula, daughter of Henry Scott, of Rattlesden, and (second) Oct. 25, 1661, Mrs. Margaret Dow, of Hampton, N. H. He died June 22, 1675. His widow died March 1, 1676. His children, all by the first marriage, and all born in England except the youngest child, were: Abigail, Henry, Elizabeth, Richard, Mary, Martha, John, Thomas and Sarah. Richard Kimball (2), son of Richard, was born in Rattlesden, England, about 1623. He came to New England with his parents. He removed from Ipswich to Wenham, near Ladd’s Hill, in the western part of the town, and became a large land owner. He was a subscriber to the minister’s rate in 1657; Dec. 4, 1660, he was on the committee to see about building the new meetinghouse, and in 1663 was on the committee to join with the select-men to put out the new contract. With the exception of three years he served on the board of selectmen from 1658 to 1674. He owned 200 acres of land in Rowley. He died in 1676. He seemed to have served in the Indian war. His second wife was Mary...

Archer Family of Fall River, MA

ARCHER (Fall River family). Through much of the nineteenth century the name opening this article was a most highly esteemed and respected one at Fall River, made so by the lives of the late Jason H. Archer, M. D., of the medical profession, and his son, the late John Jason Archer, Esq., for years one of the learned members of the Fall River bar. The home at least for a time of this Fall River Archer family was in the nearby town of Wrentham, in Norfolk county, where lived Amos Archer, father of Dr. Jason H. Archer and grandfather of the late John Jason Archer, Esq. While the Wrentham vital records do not show the Archers among the town’s early inhabitants the Archers as a family were here in Massachusetts in its early Colonial period. One Samuel Archer (name spelled in the early Essex county records Arehard) was living in Salem as early as 1630, as on Oct, 19th of that year he took the freeman’s oath there. He was born between 1602 and 1615, and was a carpenter. He was a member of the First Church before 1636; was constable of the town in 1657; and marshal from 1654 until his decease. He died in December, 1667. His wife Susanna survived him, and married (second) Richard Hutchinson in October, 1668. His children, born in Salem, Mass., were: Hannah, born in Salem; Samuel, born in 1634-35, married Hannah Osgood, of Andover, and lived in 1632, married Matthew Dove, a planter of Salem, a house carpenter; John, born in 1638, married Bethiah Weeks, and lived in Salem, a cooper; Bethiah...

Osgood Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

Mr. Osgood was born at Andover, Mass., Oct. 6, 1760; married Hannah Bailey, March 31, 1785. She was born Dec. 19, 1766; died July 10, 1829. He died March 15, 1854, in his ninety-fourth year. He came to Blue Hill shortly after his marriage, and there resided up to the time of his death.

Holt Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

Jedediah Holt was the son of Nicholas Holt, who came from Andover, Mass., to Blue Hill in 1765. Jedediah was born at Andover, March 12, 1754. He married Sarah Thorndike, Feb. 24, 1778. She died Jan. 15, 1836. They had six children as follows: Jedediah, Jeremiah, Jonah, Samuel, Stephen and Sally.

Cheever Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

Farther down the road towards the tide mills stands the house built by John Cheever about 1835. Mr. Cheever came from Beverly to Blue Hill village and settled, where he kept a store and began to build a fishing fleet, the first being the schooner “Marion”, built at the village. The father of the writer sold him the land for his house, store, wharf, fish flakes and garden, where he carried on business and continued to reside until his death in 1851, aged fifty-one years. His wife was Betsey Gardner, of Beverly, by whom he had seven children, as follows: Betsey Jackson Cheever, born March 12, 1824; married R. G. W. Dodge; died April 7, 1857. John Gardner Cheever, born June 28, 1826; supposed to have been lost at sea. Sarah Susan Cheever, born Dec. 15, 1829; died at Andover, Mass., Nov. 33, 1896. Horace W. Cheever, born Nov. 14, 1833; married and resides at Haverhill, Mass. Austin W. Cheever, born June 7, 1836; died from exposure in war of the Rebellion. George B. Cheever, born March 26, 1838; died from exposure in the war of the Rebellion. Ella Thorndike Cheever, born Jan. 29, 1845; resides in Andover, Mass. After the death of Mr. Cheever, the family removed to Andover, Mass., where Mrs. Cheever died at the age of eighty-two. Mr. Cheever built at the tide mill landing brigs “Delhi” and “Equator” and bark “Sarah Jackson”. He bought a Gloucester fishing schooner called the “Mary Ann”, and carried on quite an extensive fishing business, curing his catches and sending them to market, even sending his schooner “Marion” with a...

Carleton Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

It appears by the records that there were four person who settled in the south part of the town by the name of Carleton, whose given names were Edward, Dudley, Moses and David, all from Andover, Massachusetts, and evidently brothers. They built the mills first known as Carleton’s mills, mentioned in the town records in 1770 for the first time when Dudley Carleton was elected a selectman, in 1771 was re-elected and in 1772 was chosen one of a committee to keep the fish course clear at Carleton’s mills.

Parker Genealogy of Bluehill, Maine

Peter Parker, Sr., came from Andover, Mass., to Blue Hill Maine in 1765. He was a brother of Col. Nathan and Robert Parker, and was born at Andover Jan. 8, 1741; married Phebe Marble June 5, 1766. She was born July 29, 1744; died Oct. 1, 1805. He died October 24, 1822, aged eighty-one years, ten months and twenty-three days. Their children were as follows: Phebe, Serena, Peter, Hannah, Susannah, Marble, Mary, Isaac and Joanna.

Biography of George Oliver Locke

George Oliver Locke, of Pembroke, an ex-member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, was born in South New Market, N.H., September 19, 1826, son of Simeon and Clarissa (Tash) Locke. His great-grand-father, David Locke, who was a native of Yorkshire, England, became an early settler in Rye, N.H., where he owned a good farm, and resided there until his death, which occurred at a good old age. Simeon Locke (first), grandfather of the subject of this sketch, followed farming in Epsom for a time. Later he moved to East Concord, N.H., and there spent the rest of his life. His habits of thrift and industry enabled him to acquire considerable property. In politics he voted with the Democratic party, but his retiring disposition would not permit him to take any active part in public affairs. He attended the Congregational church. At his death he was seventy-nine years old. He married Abigail Blake, a Epsom, who attained the age of seventy-three, and was the mother of nine children. Of these the third, Simeon Locke (second), was born in East Concord. He settled in South New Market, and there followed his calling of mechanic for the rest of his active period. He was an able business man as well as a good mechanic, and by making proper use of his opportunities he realized excellent financial results. He was a Democrat in politics, and long occupied a prominent position in public affairs in South New Market. Simeon Locke, second, reached the venerable age of ninety-two years. He was a Deacon of the Methodist church. His wife, Clarissa, who was a native...

Biography of Cyrus O. Brown

Cyrus O. Brown, formerly a well-known schoolmaster and now a prosperous farmer of Epsom, was born in Kensington, N.H., August 15, 1834, son of Abel and Ruth (Fellows) Brown. On the paternal side he is a lineal descendant of John Brown, who, born in England in 1589, is said to have been of Scotch origin. It is believed that this ancestor was reared in a seaport town, as he was a ship-carpenter by trade. It is recorded that he was concerned in the building of many vessels for the king. He emigrated to New England, and became one of the first settlers of Hampton, N.H. He was married in that town in 1640 or 1641; and Benjamin, the second of his three sons, was born in Seabrook, N.H. From John Brown, born in England in 1589, the line of descent comes by Benjamin Brown, born in Seabrook, in 1647; Benjamin Brown, Jr., born in South Hampton in 1684; Jonathan Brown, born in Kensington in 1718; Abel Brown, born in Kensington in 1760; and Abel Brown, Jr., born in Kensington in 1797. Abel Brown, Sr., the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was a school teacher in his younger days. Taking an active part in public affairs, he served as a Selectman, and was employed to settle many estates. He lived to the age of eighty-six years. In politics he was a Whig. He married Sally Paige, a native of Kensington, and a daughter of Stephen Paige, who was a Deacon of the Congregational church. Mrs. Abel Brown, first, lived to be eighty-two years old. She reared five children-Abel,...

Biography of William Leavitt Bennett

William Leavitt Bennett, a prominent resident of Andover, was born in the town of Loudon, this State, January 16, 1837. His grandfather, Jeremiah Bennett, formerly of Kingston, accompanied Clough, journeyed from there to Loudon, carrying his luggage and implements on a hand-barrow. Having chosen a tract of timbered land favorably situated, he felled a few trees, and built a log hut. He had been a reed-maker by trade; but, after coming to Loudon, he devoted himself to clearing his land and to tilling the soil. He gradually placed it under cultivation; and, when he died, at the ripe age of ninety-five years, he could look with pride on a well-improved farm, won from a wilderness through his own industry and courage. His wife’s name before marriage was Alice Courrier. Their son Amos grew up on the farm, and was from boyhood trained to agricultural pursuits, in which he was engaged throughout the rest of his life. A man of thrift and industry, he increased the tillage area of the farm. His wife, who was christened Nancy Batchelder, became the mother of four sons and one daughter-Lucretia N., William L., Jeremiah F., True H., and Joseph Clark. True fought in the late war with the Ninth New Hampshire Cavalry, and lost his life in the service. Jeremiah lives in Rockford, Ill.; and Joseph Clark resides at Oelwein, Ia. William Leavitt Bennett was educated in the public schools of his native town. Afterward he learned the carpenter’s trade, and worked in factories at Concord and Laconia, this State, and in Springfield, Mass. For a time, also, he was night watch at...
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