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Biography of Charles N. Converse

Charles N. Converse. Identified with banks and banking all through his business life, Charles N. Converse, president of the Citizens State Bank of Altoona, Kansas, is widely known in financial circles where his judgment is deemed sound and accurate, and his reputation had long been that of a forcible, able and efficient business man. Charles N. Converse was born at Clinton, Illinois, June 22, 1863. His parents were Henry E. and Clara (Weaver) Converse, and his grandfathers were John Converse and Solomon Weaver. Solomon Weaver emigrated from Germany in boyhood and grew up at Clinton, Illinois, in which neighborhood he engaged in farming and there he died in 1883. On the paternal side the family traces its ancestry to France and when the first of the name, two brothers, came together to the American colonies, they spelled it Congiers. The brothers separated, one settling at Boston, Massachusetts, and the other at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. John Converse, the paternal grandfather, was born at Woburn, Massachusetts, February 14, 1813, and died at Clinton, Illinois, in June, 1880. He was an early settler in DeWitt County, Illinois, and a pioneer shoemaker at Clinton. He was a member of the Baptist Church and a good and worthy citizen. He married Eurania Nelson, who was born at Sutton, Massachusetts, in 1815, and died at Clinton, Illinois, in 1890. Of their family of children one survives, Frank H., a resident of Decatur, Illinois, a retired contractor and builder. During the Civil war he served as a member of the Eleventh Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. The grandmother of Charles N. Converse, was a direct descendant of the great...

Biography of H. Clay Fisk

H. Clay Fisk, Superintendent of the city schools of Nowata, was born in Altoona, Kansas, on the 8th of August, 1887, a son of F. M. and Mary (Matkin) Fisk. The father came to Oklahoma at the opening of the Cherokee strip, making the run on the back of a bucking mule, and secured a claim of one hundred and sixty acres near Cherokee in Alfalfa County. In the acquirement of an education H. Clay Fisk attended the rural schools of Alfalfa County until he had finished the eighth grade, when he enrolled in the Stella Academy at Cherokee, where he was a student for sometime. He was graduated from the Northwestern State Normal School at Alva, this state, in 1910, and for the following year was principal of the Cherokee high school. He then returned to the Northwestern State Normal School as assistant instructor in the chemistry department and was active in that connection for one and one-half years, at the termination of which time he resigned and took a course at the University of Kansas for an A. B. degree. Professor Fisk was then Superintendent of the schools at Cherokee for three years, again resigning to take the B. S. degree at the University of Kansas. After receiving that degree he was, in 1917, elected Superintendent of the city schools of Nowata, a position which he has continued to hold. Since he assumed the duties of Superintendent the new high school building has been erected and also a new high school for the colored children. When he first took charge of the schools there were but eighty-five...

Biography of George L. Atkeson

George L. Atkeson. To those parents who value the intellectual development of their children, it is a matter of vital importance that in the early and formative period of their lives, their instructors in the public schools should be thoroughly qualified for such responsibility in scholarly attainments and in personal character. In securing so widely known and so experienced an educator as George L. Atkeson as superintendent of their city schools, the good people of Altoona, Kansas, displayed exceptional wisdom. Intelligent public opinion here, as at other points, makes more insistent demands, asks for more decided results than in old days, a realization having come that the needs of future generations must not be imperiled by any narrowing of public school education in the present. A wider and deeper service is demanded than ever before, and to this field of effort a welcome is given the able, the understanding, the progressive educational leader, a worthy example of this class being found in George L. Atkeson. He is a native of Missouri, born near Tipton, in Morgan County, September 20, 1866. His parents were Francis M. and Mary A. (Frye) Atkeson. Francis M. Atkeson was born in 1830, near Charleston in Kanawha County, West Virginia, in which section the early ancestors of the family had settled after coming from England. His father, Andrew Atkeson, was also born in what is now West Virginia, and from there, probably in 1832, removed with his family to Morgan County, Missouri. He became a farmer there and operated the first blacksmith shop in Tipton. Practically Francis M. Atkeson spent his entire life near Tipton,...

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