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Wilcox, Electa Margaret – Obituary

Enterprise, Oregon Mrs. J. R. Wilcox Laid To Rest Funeral services were held at the Catholic church in Enterprise Wednesday at 10 a.m. for Mrs. J.R. Wilcox, who passed away at the Enterprise hospital April 4, 1943. Burial was in the family lot in the local cemetery by the side of a son who died many years ago. Electa Margaret Coffen was born December 24, 1878, in Iowa. In October 1898, she was united in marriage to Joseph Ruel Wilcox. The first two years of their married life were spent in Minneapolis, Minn. In 1901 they moved to Alberta, Canada, where they spent seven years, coming in 1909 to Oregon and Wallowa County, where she had lived ever since, beloved by all who knew her. Mrs. Wilcox is survived by her husband, two daughters, Mrs. Arthur Anderson (Agnes) of Portland, and Mrs. Henry Firchau (Emma) of Lebanon; four grandchildren, Eleanor, Albert, Henry Jr. and Agnes Firchau; two brothers and four sisters; Horace Coffen of Minneapolis, Warren Coffen of Enterprise, Mrs. Ellen Ferdinandsen of Aberdeen, South Dakota, Mrs. Minnie Kost of Aklavik, Northwest Territory, Mrs. Ellen Littleton, Cedar Rapids, Iowa., and Mrs. Rose Burroughs, Waterton, South Dakota. Wallowa County Chieftain, Thursday, April 8, 1943, Front...

Paul, Jean Eliza Schnebly – Obituary

Native Ellensburg resident Jean E. Paul, 95, died Wednesday [November 3, 1982] at Gold Leaf Nursing Home where she had lived for the past seven years. She was born Feb. 14, 1887-a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. P. H. Schnebly. She attended local schools, Ellensburg Normal School and obtained a registered nursing degree from Good Samaritan Hospital in Portland, Ore. She and John H. Paul were married in Ellensburg on Sept. 3, 1912. Except for seven years, when they homesteaded in Alberta, Canada, the couple made their home in the Ellensburg area, Mr. Paul died May 19, 1975. Mrs. Paul was a member of the Jolly Neighbors and the Progressive Club. Survivors include three sons, Phillip, John, and Robert, all of Ellensburg; two daughters, Mrs. Merle (Edna) Walker, Edmonds, and Mrs. Jim (Marjorie) Burke, Ellensburg; 18 grandchildren; 19 great grandchildren; and one sister, Mrs. Joe (Edith) Gehlen, Seattle. Her funeral will be 10 a.m., Saturday at Evenson Chapel, with the Rev. Don Meekhof officiating. Entombment will follow at the IOOF mausoleum. Daily Record, November 5, 1982 Contributed by: Shelli...

Kainah Tribe

Kainah First Nation, Kainah Indians, Blood Indians (Ah-kai-nah, ‘many chiefs,’ from a-kai-im many , ni´-nah chiefs ). A division of the Siksika, or Blackfeet, now living on a reservation under the Blood agency in Alberta, Canada, between Belly and St Mary Rivers. The subtribes or bands are Ahkaiksumiks, Ahkaipokaks, Ahkptashiks, Ahkwonistsists, Anepo, Apikaiyiks, Aputpsikainah, Inuhksoyistamiks, Isisokasimiks, Istsikainah, Mameoya, Nitikskiks, Saksinahmahyiks, Siksahpuniks, and Siksinokaks. According to the Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs for 1858, there were then 300 tipis and 2,400 persons. In 1904 there were 1,196 persons on the reservation, of whom 958 were classed as pagans. Alternate Spellings: Bloodies. Hind, Red R. Exped., 157, 1860 (so called by half-breeds). Blood Indians. Writer of 1786 in Mass. Hist. Soc. Coll., 1st s., in, 24, 1794. Blood People. Morgan, Consang. and Affin., 289, 1871. Blut Indianer. Walch, map, 1805 (Ger man form). Ede-but-say. Anon. Crow MS. vocab., B. A. E. (Crow name). Gens du Sang. Duflot de Mofras, Expl., n, 342, 1844. Indiens du Sang. Ibid., 339. Kaenna. Maximilian, Travels, 245, 1843. Kahna. Ibid. Kai´-e-na. Hayden, Ethnog. and Philol. Mo. Val., 256, 1862. Kaimè. Browne in Beach, Ind. Miscel., 81, 1877. Kai´-na. Clark Wissler, inf’n, 1905 (Piegan dialectic form). Kai´nau. Tims, Blackfoot Gram. and Dict., 113, 1889 (Siksika name). Kainœ´-koon. Franklin, Journ. Polar Sea, I, 170, 1824 (own name). Kam´-ne. Hayden, op. cit., 402 (Crow name). Ke´na. Hale, Ethnol. and Philol. 219, 1846 (sing., Keneku’n). Ki-nä. Morgan, Consang. and Affin., 289, 1871 (trans.: high minded people ). Kine-ne-ai-koon. Henry, MS. vocab., 1808. Ki´-no. Morgan, Anc. Soc., 171, 1877. Meethco-thinyoowuc. Franklin, Journ. Polar  Sea , I, 170, 1824. We´-wi-ca-å....

Siksika Tribe

Siksika Indians. A tribe of the Siksika confederacy (see below). They now (1905) live on a reservation in Alberta, Canada, on upper Bow River, and are officially known as the Running Rabbit and Yellow Horse bands. They were divided into the following subtribes or bands: Aisikstukiks, Apikaiyiks, Emi-tahpahksaiyiks, Motahtosiks, Puhksinahmahyiks, Saiyiks, Siksinokaks,Tsiniktsistsoyiks. Pop. 942 in 1902, 795 in 1909. Siksika Confederacy Siksika Confederacy, (‘black feet’, from siksinam ‘black’, ka the root of ogkatsh ‘foot’. The origin of the name is disputed, but it is commonly believed to have reference to the discoloring of their moccasins by the ashes of the prairie fires; it may possibly have reference to black-painted moccasins, such as were worn by the Pawnee, Sihasapa, and other tribes). An important Algonquian confederacy of the northern plains, consisting of three subtribes, the Sikisa proper or Blackfeet, the Kainah or Bloods, and the Piegan, the whole body being popularly known as Blackfeet. In close alliance with these are the Atsina and the Sarsi. Within the recent historic period, until gathered upon reservations, the Blackfeet held most of the immense territory stretching almost from North Saskatchewan River, Canada, to the southern head-streams of the Missouri in Montana, and from about longitude 105° to the base of the Rocky Mountains. A century earlier, or about 1790, they were found by Mackenzie occupying the upper and middle South Saskatchewan, with the Atsina on the lower course of the same stream, both tribes being apparently in slow migration toward the N. W.1. This would make them the vanguard of the Algonquian movement from the Red River country. With the exception of a...

Shoshonean Indians

Shoshonean Family, Shoshonean People, Shoshonean Nation. The extent of country occupied renders this one of the most important of the linguistic families of the North American Indians. The area held by Shoshonean tribes, exceeded by the territory of only two families – the Algonquian and the Athapascan, – may thus be described: On the north the south west part of Montana, the whole of Idaho south of about lat. 45° 30′, with south east Oregon, south of the Blue Mountains, west and central Wyoming, west and central Colorado, with a strip of north New Mexico; east New Mexico and the whole of north west Texas were Shoshonean. According to Grinnell, Blackfoot (Siksika) tradition declares that when the Blackfeet entered the plains south of Belly River they found that country occupied by the Snake and the Crow. If this be true, south west Alberta and north west Montana were also Shoshonean territory. All of Utah, a section of north Arizona, and the whole of Nevada (except a small area occupied by the Washo) were held by Shoshonean tribes. Of California a small strip in the north east part east of the Sierras, and a wide section along the east border south of about lat. 38°, were also Shoshonean. Shoshonean bands also lived along the upper courses of some of the streams flowing into the San Joaquin. Toward the broken southern flanks of the Sierras, Shoshonean territory extended across the state in a wide band, reaching north to Tejon Creek, while along the Pacific the Shoshoni occupied the coast between lat. 33° and 34°. From the wide extent of country thus...

Blackfeet Tribe

Blackfeet Indians, Siksika Tribe, Siksika Indians (‘black feet’, from siksinam ‘black’, ka the root of oqkatsh, ‘foot’. The origin of the name is disputed, but it is commonly believed to have reference to the discoloring of their moccasins by the ashes of the prairie fires; it may possibly have reference to black-painted moccasins such as were worn by the Pawnee, Sihasapa, and other tribes). An important Algonquian confederacy of the northern plains, consisting of three subtribes, the Siksika proper or Blackfeet, the Kainah or Bloods, and the Piegan, the whole body being popularly known as Blackfeet. In close alliance with these are the Atsina and the Sarsi. Within the recent historic period, until gathered upon reservations, the Blackfeet held most of the immense territory stretching almost from North Saskatchewan river, Canada, to the southern headstreams of the Missouri in Montana, and from about lon.105° to the base of the Rocky mountains. A century earlier, or about 1790, they were found by Mackenzie occupying the upper and middle South Saskatchewan, with the Atsina on the lower course of the same stream, both tribes being apparently in slow migration toward the north west1. This would make them the vanguard of tile Algonquian movement from the Red river country. With the exception of a temporary occupancy by invading Cree, this extreme northern region has always, within the historic period, been hold by Athapascan tribes. The tribe is now settled on three reservations in Alberta, Canada, and one in north west Montana, about half being on each side of the international boundary. So far as history and tradition go, the Blackfeet have been...

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