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Slave Narrative of Ben Brown

Interviewer: Albert I Dugan Person Interviewed: Ben Brown Location: Keen St., Zanesville, Ohio Age: 100 Occupation: Railroad worker Yes suh I wuz a slave in Vaginyah, Alvamaul (Albermarle) county an’ I didn’t have any good life, I’m tellin’ you dat! It wuz a tough life. I don’t know how old I am, dey never told me down dere, but the folks here say I’m a hunderd yeah old an’ I spect dats about right. My fathah’s name wuz Jack Brown and’ my mammy’s Nellie Brown. Dey wuz six of us chillun, one sistah Hannah an’ three brothers, Jim, Harrison, an’ Spot. Jim wuz de oldes an’ I wuz next. We wuz born on a very lauge plantation an dey wuz lots an’ lots of other slaves, I don’t know how many. De log cabins what we live in[HW:?] on both sides de path make it look like a town. Mastah’s house wuz a big, big one an’ had big brick chimneys on de outside. It wuz a frame house, brown, an’ set way back from de road, an’ behind dat wuz de slaves’ quarters. De mastah, he wuz Fleming Moon an’ dey say he wuz cap’n in de wah of 1812. De missy wuz Parley Moon and dey had one son an fouh daughters. All us chillun an mammy live in a log cabin dat wuz lauge enuf foh us an we sleep in good beds, tall ones an’ low ones dat went undaneath, trundles dey call ’em, and de covahs wuz comfohtable. De mammies did de cookin. We et cohn bread, beans, soup, cabbage an’ some othah vegtubles,...

Biography of George R. Wendling, Jr.

George R. Wendling, Jr., of the Myers-Wendling Insurance Company of St. Louis, was born March 9, 1894, in Bloomington, Illinois. His father, George R. Wendling, was also a native of Illinois, his birth having occurred in Shelby county. He became a prominent attorney of that state and was a member of a constitutional convention of 1870 which framed the organic law of the commonwealth and had the distinction of being the youngest representative in that body, as he was only twenty-five years of age when elected. He won wide popularity as a lecturer as well as distinction in law practice. For several years he was associated in his professional activity with Judge Anthony Thornton, at one time chief justice of the state of Illinois. In politics Mr. Wendling was a lifelong democrat and exerted considerable influence over political affairs in state and nation, yet never sought nor desired public office. In early manhood he married Josephine Stephenson, a daughter of James Stephenson, who was born in Virginia. In tha family of Mr. and Mrs. George R. Wendling, Sr., were two daughters: Mrs. O. W. Catching, of Vicksburg, Mississippi, her husband being a prominent attorney there, and Mrs. William S. Conant, whose husband is a consulting engineer of Detroit, Michigan. The son of the family, George R. Wendling, Jr., was educated in the public schools of Washington, D. C., and then went to Woodbury Forest, Virginia, where he pursued a course preparatory to entering upon his business career. He afterward continued his studies at Lawrenceville, New Jersey, for four years, and next entered Princeton University, while still later he pursued...

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