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Treaty of June 19, 1858 – Mdwekakanton

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at the city of Washington, on the nineteenth day of June, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight, by Charles E. Mix, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the following-named chiefs and headmen of the Mendawakanton and Wahpakoota bands of the Dakota or Sioux tribe of Indians, viz, Wabashaw, Chetanakooamonee, Washuhiyahidan, Shakopee, Wamindeetonkee, Muzzaojanjan, and Makawto, chiefs, and Hinhanduta, Ha-raka-Muzza, Wakanojanjan, Tachunr-pee-muz-za, Wakinyantowa, Chunrpiyuha, Onkeeterhidan, and Wamouisa, braves, on the part of the Mendawakantons, and Hushawshaw, chief, and Pa-Pa and Tataebomdu, braves, on the part of the Wahpakootas, they being duly authorized and empowered to act for said bands. Article 1. It is hereby agreed and stipulated that, as soon as practicable after the ratification of this agreement, so much of that part of the reservation or tract of land now held and possessed by the Mendawakanton and Wahpakoota bands of the Dakota or Sioux Indians, and which is described in the third article of the treaty made with them on the fifth day of August, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-one, which lies south or southwestwardly of the Minnesota River, shall constitute a reservation for said bands, and shall be surveyed, and eighty acres thereof, as near as may be in conformity with the public surveys, be allotted in severalty to each head of a family, or single person over the age of twenty-one years, in said band of Indians, said allotments to be so made as to include a proper proportion of timbered land, if the same be practicable, in each of said allotments. The residue of...

Treaty of June 19, 1858 – Sisseton

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at the city of Washington on the nineteenth day of June, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight, by Charles E. Mix, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the following-named chiefs and head-men of the Sisseeton and Wahpaton bands of the Dakota or Sioux tribe of Indians, viz: Maz-zah-shaw, Wamdupidutah, Ojupi, and Hahutanai, on the part of the Sisseetons, and Maz-zomanee, Muz-zakoote-manee, Upiyahideyaw, Umpedutokechaw, and Tachandupahotanka, on the part of the Wahpatons, they being duly authorized and empowered to act for said bands. Article 1. It is hereby agreed and stipulated that as soon as practicable after the ratification of this agreement, so much of that part of the reservation or tract of land now held and possessed by the Sisseeton and Wahpaton bands of the Dakota or Sioux Indians, and which is described in the third article of the treaty made with them on the twenty-third day of July, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-one, which lies south or south west wardly of the Minnesota River, shall constitute a reservation for said bands, and shall be surveyed, and eighty acres thereof, as near as may be in conformity with the public surveys, be allotted in severalty to each head of a family or single person over the age of twenty-one years, in said bands of Indians; said allotments to be so made as to include a proper proportion of timbered land, if the same be practicable, in each of said allotments. The residue of said part of said reservation not so allotted shall be held by said bands...

Treaty of July 23, 1851

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Traverse des Sioux, upon the Minnesota River, in the Territory of Minnesota, on the twenty-third day of July, eighteen hundred and fifty-one, between the United States of America, by Luke Lea, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, and Alexander Ramsey, governor and ex-officio superintendent of Indian affairs in said Territory, commissioners duly appointed for that purpose, and See-see-toan and Wah-pay-toan bands of Dakota or Sioux Indians. Article 1. It is stipulated and solemnly agreed that the peace and friendship now so happily existing between the United States and the aforesaid bands of Indians, shall be perpetual. Article 2. The said See-see-toan and Wah-pay-toan bands of Dakota or Sioux Indians, agree to cede, and do hereby cede, sell, and relinquish to the United States, all their lands in the State of Iowa; and, also all their lands in the Territory of Minnesota, lying east of the following line, to wit: Beginning at the junction of the Buffalo River with the Red River of the North; thence along the western bank of said Red River of the North, to the mouth of the Sioux Wood River; thence along the western bank of said Sioux Wood River to Lake Traverse; thence, along the western shore of said lake, to the southern extremity thereof; thence in a direct line, to the junction of Kampeska Lake with the Tchan-kas-an-data, or Sioux River; thence along the western bank of said river to its point of intersection with the northern line of the State of Iowa; including all the islands in said rivers and lake. Article 3. [Stricken out.] Article...

Treaty of May 12, 1854

Articles of agreement made and concluded at the Falls of Wolf River, in the State of Wisconsin, on the twelfth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four, between the United States of America, by Francis Huebschmann, superintendent of Indian affairs, duly authorized thereto, and the Menomonee tribe of Indians, by the chiefs, headmen, and warriors of said tribe—such articles being supplementary and amendatory to the treaty made between the United States and said tribe on the eighteenth day of October, one thousand eight hundred and forty-eight. Whereas, among other provisions contained in the treaty in the caption mentioned, it is stipulated that for and in consideration of all the lands owned by the Menomonees, in the State of Wisconsin, wherever situated, the United States should give them all that country or tract of land ceded by the Chippewa Indians of the Mississippi and Lake Superior, in the treaty of the second of August, eighteen hundred and forty-seven, and by the Pillager band of Chippewa Indians in the treaty of the twenty-first of August, eighteen hundred and forty-seven, which had not been assigned to the Winnebagoes, guarantied not to contain less than six hundred thousand acres; should pay them forty thousand dollars for removing and subsisting themselves; should give them fifteen thousand dollars for the establishment of a manual-labor school, the erection of a grist and saw mill, and for other necessary improvements in their new country; should cause to be laid out and expended in the hire of a miller, for the period of fifteen years, nine thousand dollars; and for continuing and keeping up a blacksmith...

Treaty of August 5, 1851

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Mendota, in the Territory of Minnesota, on the fifth day of August, eighteen hundred and fifty-one, between the United States of America, by Luke Lea, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, and Alexander Ramsey, governor and ex-officio superintendent of Indian affairs in said Territory, commissioners duly appointed for that purpose, and the Med-ay-wa-kan-toan and Wah-pay-koo-tay bands of Dakota and Sioux Indians. Article 1. The peace and friendship existing between the United States and the Med-ay-wa-kan-toan and Wah-pay-koo-tay bands of Dakota or Sioux Indians shall be perpetual. Article 2. The said Med-ay-wa-kan-toan and Wah-pay-koo-tay bands of Indians do hereby cede and relinquish all their lands and all their right, title and claim to any lands whatever, in the Territory of Minnesota, or in the State of Iowa. Article 3. [Stricken out.] Article 4. In further and full consideration of said cession and relinquishment, the United States agree to pay to said Indians the sum of one million four hundred and ten thousand dollars, ($1,410,000,) at the several times, in the manner and for the purposes following, to wit: 1st. To the chiefs of the said bands, to enable them to settle their affairs and comply with their present just engagements; and in consideration of their removing themselves to the country set apart for them as above, (which they agree to do within one year after the ratification of this treaty, without further cost or expense to the United States,) and in consideration of their subsisting themselves the first year after their removal, (which they agree to do without further cost or expense on the...

Treaty of October 13, 1846

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at the city of Washington, on the thirteenth day of October, in the year one thousand eight hundred and forty-six, between the United States, of the one part, by their commissioners, Albion K. Parris, John J. Abert, and T. P. Andrews, and the Winnebago tribe of Indians, of the other part, by a full delegation of said tribe, specially appointed by the chiefs, head-men, and warriors thereof. Article 1. It is solemnly agreed that the peace and friendship which exist between the people of the United States and the Winnebago Indians shall be perpetual; the said tribe of Indians giving assurance, hereby, of fidelity and friendship to the Government and people of the United States, and the United States giving to them, at the same time, promise of all proper care and parental protection. Article 2. The said tribe of Indians hereby agree to cede and sell, and do hereby cede and sell, to the United States, all right, title, interest, claim, and privilege, to all lands, wherever situated, now or heretofore occupied or claimed by said Indians, within the States and Territories of the United States, and especially to the country now occupied, inhabited, or in any way used by them, called the “neutral ground,” which tract of country was assigned to said Indians by the second article of the treaty of Fort Armstrong, concluded on the fifteenth day of September, 1832, and ratified on the thirteenth day of February following. Article 3. In consideration of the foregoing purchase from, or cession by, the said Indians, the United States hereby agree...

Treaty of September 29, 1837

Articles of a treaty, made at the City of Washington, between Joel R.Poinsett, thereto specially authorized by the President of the United States, and certain chiefs and braves of the Sioux nation of Indians. Article I.The chiefs and braves representing the parties having an interest therein, cede to the United States all their land, east of the Mississippi river, and all their islands in the said river. Article II.In consideration of the cession contained in the preceding article, the United States agree to the following stipulations on their part. First. To invest the sum of $300,000 (three hundred thousand dollars) in such safe and profitable State stocks as the President may direct, and to pay to the chiefs and braves as aforesaid, annually, forever, an income of not less than five per cent. thereon; a portion of said interest, not exceeding one third, to be applied in such manner as the President may direct, and the residue to be paid in specie, or in such other manner, and for such objects, as the proper authorities of the tribe may designate. Second. To pay to the relatives and friends of the chiefs and braves, as aforesaid, having not less than one quarter of Sioux blood, $110,000 (one hundred and ten thousand dollars,) to be distributed by the proper authorities of the tribe, upon principles to be determined by the chiefs and braves signing this treaty, and the War Department. Third. To apply the sum of $90,000 (ninety thousand dollars) to the payment of just debts of the Sioux Indians, interested in the lands herewith ceded. Fourth. To pay to the...

Treaty of Nov. 1, 1837

Articles of a treaty made at the city of Washington, between Carey A. Harris, thereto specially directed by the President of the United States, and the Winnebago nation of Indians, by their chiefs and delegates. Article I.The Winnebago nation of Indians cede to the United States all their land east of the Mississippi river. Article II.The said Indians further agree to relinquish the right to occupy, except for the purpose of hunting a portion of the land held by them west of the Mississippi, included between that river and a line drawn from a point twenty miles distant there from on the southern boundary of the neutral ground to a point, equidistant from the said river, on the northern boundary thereof. But this stipulation shall not be so construed, as to invalidate their title to the said tract. Article III.The said Indians agree to remove within eight months from the ratification of this treaty, to that portion of the neutral ground west of the Mississippi, which was conveyed to them in the second article of the treaty of September 15th, [21st] 1832, and the United States agree that the said Indians may hunt upon the western part of said neutral ground until they shall procure a permanent settlement. Article IV.In consideration of the cession and relinquishment contained in the preceding articles, the United States agree to the following stipulations on their part. First. To set apart the sum of two hundred thousand dollars ($200,000) for the following purposes: To pay to the individuals herein named the sum specified for each; To Nicholas Boilvin, six thousand dollars ($6,000); to the...

Treaty of November 23, 1837

Articles of a treaty made at the city of Saint Louis, between Joshua Pilcher, thereto specially authorized by the President of the United States, and the Ioway [Iowa] Indians, by their chiefs and delegates. Article 1. The Ioway Indians cede to the United States all the right and interest in the land ceded by the treaty, concluded with them and other tribes on the 15th of July 1830, which they might be entitled to claim, by virtue of the phraseology employed in the second article of said treaty. Article 2. In consideration of the cession contained in the preceding article, the United States stipulate to pay them two thousand five hundred dollars ($2,500) in horses, goods and presents, upon their signing this treaty in the city of Saint Louis. Article 3. The expenses of this negotiation and of the chiefs and delegates signing this treaty to the city of Washington and to their homes to be paid by the United States. Article 4. This treaty to be binding upon the contracting parties when the same shall be ratified by the United States. In witness whereof the said Joshua Pilcher and the undersigned chiefs and delegates of said Indians have hereunto set their hands at the city of Saint Louis, this twenty-third day of November A. D. 1837. Joshua Pilcher, U. S. Indian agent. Ne-o-mon-ni Non-che-ning-ga Wat-che-mon-ne Tah-ro-hon Signed in presence of: E. A. Hitchcock, Captain U. S. Army John B Farpy. L. G. C....

Treaty of Oct. 21, 1837

Articles of a treaty made at the city of Washington, between Carey A. Harris, thereto specially authorized by the President of the United States, and the Yankton tribe of Sioux Indians, by their chiefs and delegates. Article I.The Yankton tribe of Sioux Indians cede to the United States all the right and interest in the land ceded by the treaty, concluded with them and other tribes on the fifteenth of July, 1830, which they might be entitled to claim, by virtue of the phraseology employed in the second article of said treaty. Article II.In consideration of the cession contained in the preceding article, the United States stipulate to pay them four thousand dollars ($4,000.) It is understood and agreed, that fifteen hundred dollars ($1,500) of this sum shall be expended in the purchase of horses and presents, upon the arrival of the chiefs and delegates at St. Louis; two thousand dollars ($2,000) delivered to them in goods, at the expense of the United States, at the time their annuities are delivered next year; and five hundred dollars ($500) be applied to defray the expense of removing the agency building and blacksmith shop from their present site. Article III.The expenses of this negotiation, and of the chiefs and delegates signing this treaty to this city and to their homes, to be paid by the United States. Article IV.This treaty to be binding upon the contracting parties, when the same shall be ratified by the United States. In witness whereof, the said Carey A. Harris, and the undersigned chiefs and delegates of said tribe, have hereunto set their hands at the...
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