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Biography of James Wheatley

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James Wheatley, farmer and stock-raiser; P. O. Hinesboro; the subject of this sketch was born in Charleston, Clarke Co., Ind., Aug. 9, 1826; he married Miss Mary E. Work Jan. 10, 1850; she was born in Clarke Co., Ind., Dec. 20,1831; they had six children, five living, viz., Junius, Dessie, Carlos, Lucien and Ozeta; he lived in Indiana about eight years, when, with his father, he went to Kentucky and lived in Lexington and Harrodsburg until his 18th year, when he returned to his birthplace in Indiana and engaged in farming until he was married; after his marriage, he removed to Southern Kentucky, and, in April, 1853, to Coles Co., and settled the farm on which he now resides; his parents, Walter and Catharine (Beggs) Wheatley, were natives of Maryland and Virginia; they were married in Clarke Co., Ind.; he was born July 12, 1791; in 1836, he went to Harrodsburg, and was appointed Postmaster of the place in 1843, which office he held until 1861, since which time he has not engaged in any business; he is now living with a son in West Virginia; his wife’s parents, John and Hannah (Thomas) Beggs, were natives of Augusta and Rockingham Cos., Va., and were born in January, 1766, and November, 1764, respectively; they were married in 1788, and moved to Kentucky in 1792 or 1793, and to Clarke Co., Ind., in 1799, and died on the farm which they settled, in April, 1845, and May, 1853, respectively; of their nine children two survive, viz., Mary Stilwell (of Jackson Co., Ind.) and Ruth Cole (of Douglas Co., Ill.) The present Mrs. Wheatley’s parents, Samuel and Elizabeth (Henley) Work, were natives of Pennsylvania and North Carolina; he emigrated to Bear Grass, Ky., where his father died; the care of the family then fell to him, and they moved to Clarke Co., Ind., and engaged in farming, where he died on a farm adjoining the old homestead; his wife’s parents, Jesse and Catharine Henley, were natives of North Carolina, where he had been a slaveholder, having some forty-odd slaves, who, owing to his political views (of the Abolition school) were freed; he moved to Clarke Co., Ind., about the year 1800, where he engaged in farming.

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