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Biography of Daniel A. Van Sickle

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Daniel A. Van Sickle, proprietor of the Charleston Hotel, Charleston; was born in Trenton, Butler Co., Ohio, Oct. 20, 1833, being the oldest son of J. C. and Belinda (Craig) Van Sickle; his father was born in Trenton, Ohio, May 31, 1811, and his mother at Ball’s Ferry, on the Miami River, in Butler Co., Ohio, Dec. 17, 1815. The family consisted of nine children, as follows-Daniel A. Jasper, born Jan. 3, 1836, and died Nov. 12, 1868; Sally A., born March 19, 1838; Caroline, born June 20, 1841, and died Feb. 26, 1866; John Wesley, born March 18, 1843; George W., born Aug. 17, 1846; Newton, born Dec. 23, 1848, died Aug. 24, 1850; Craig, born Feb. 23, 1851, died March 15, 1853, and Charles P., born July 10, 1853. At the age of 17 years, Mr. Van Sickle began with Schenck & Denice, of Franklin, Warren Co., Ohio, to learn the horseshoeing business, and followed that trade altogether about fourteen years. In 1851, his father removed with the family to Coles Co., and about ten years ago, he removed to Girard, Macoupin C6., Ill., where he died Sept. 25, 1876. His mother still resides in Girard. During his residence in Charleston, he has been engaged six years as a clerk in the wholesale and retail grocery house of Wright, Minton & Co.; has served as City Marshal, Street Superintendent and Township Collector, and has traveled five years selling groceries from Indianapolis. He was married Aug. 27, 1857, to Miss Belinda Wehr, a daughter of Nathan and Harriet (Flenner) Wehr; she was born Aug. 28, 1839, near Hamilton, Butler Co., Ohio, and came to Coles Co. in 1853; they have one daughter-Louisa Bell, born Aug. 16, 1858. April 1, 1878, Mr. Van Sickle became proprietor of the Charleston Hotel. Whether shoeing a horse or selling groceries, his aim has always been to excel, and on assuming charge of this house, he determined to keep such a house as should deserve the patronage of the public and should earn the title of a strictly first-class hotel. His experience as a traveling man enables him to understand and appreciate the wants of the traveling public. How well he has succeeded is shown by the large and constantly-increasing patronage of the hotel. Genial in manner and accommodating in disposition, he makes every one feel at home at once, and in the variety and quality of its fare, and in attention to the comforts of its guests, the Charleston Hotel is not ex- celled by any house between Indianapolis and St. Louis.

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