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Biography of Hon. T. W. Thiesen

Hon. T. W. Thiesen, Racine’s popular mayor and one of its most efficient and progressive business men, now president of the Red Cross Drug Company, was born in Hamburg, Germany, November 19, 1867, a son of Thies and Emma (Karsten) Thiesen. He began to earn his living when but six years of age as a bootblack and newsboy and afterward became a butcher’s apprentice. On the 18th of June, 1884, when a youth of sixteen years, he left Germany and on the 4th of July, 1884, arrived in Racine. Here he secured employment in the drug store of Charles Giesler, with whom he worked for three years at ten dollars per month. He afterward spent one year in Milwaukee. Wisconsin, where he was employed as a drug clerk, and then, feeling the necessity of further educational development as a preparation for advancement in life, he entered the University of Wisconsin, through which he made his way by practicing strict economy. He had previously saved from his earnings the sum of one hundred and eighty dollars and by living frugally and utilizing every opportunity he managed to complete the course, being graduated from the pharmaceutical department with the class of 1890. Mr. Thiesen next went to Kansas City, where he spent three weeks, after which he proceeded to St. Joseph, Missouri, where he was employed for two and a half years. In September, 1892, with the capital which he had saved from his earnings, he returned to Racine and opened a drug store on State Street. The following year he became one of the organizers of the Robinson Drug Company,...

Biography of George Alvin Uebele

George Alvin Uebele, cashier of the Bank of Burlington, exemplifies in his business career that thoroughness and efficiency which have always characterized the institution which he represents, making it one of the strong financial centers of southeastern Wisconsin. His entire life has been spent in this section of the state, his birth having occurred at Wheatland, Kenosha County, February 25, 1874. His father, Frederick Uebele, a native of Germany, came to America in the early ’50s and settled in Wheatland, near Slades Corners. He was but eight years of age when his parents died and in 1848 the children of the family, of whom he was one of the youngest, came to Wisconsin. He was a young man of twenty-one years when, in 1861, he responded to the country’s call for aid and enlisted in the Ninth Wisconsin Light Artillery. He went to St. Louis and much of his service was in Colorado and the west, fighting the Indians. He experienced many hardships owing to the extremes of heat and cold and starvation conditions which existed. He continued to serve, however, until almost the close of the war, when he received an honorable discharge and with his regiment returned to Wisconsin. Soon afterward Mr. Uebele began farming on his own account and was very successful in the cultivation and management of his property, winning well merited prosperity through his close attention to business. In 1866 he married Susan Runkel, and in October, 1916, they will celebrate their golden wedding. Mr. Uebele has always avoided public office, but has a good, clean record as an enterprising citizen whose influence has...

Biography of Hon. J. H. Kamper

Hon. J. H. Kamper, who is carrying on general agricultural pursuits near North Cape, was born in Denmark, December 17, 1857, a son of Peter H. and Christina (Rasmussen) Kamper. The father was born in Denmark in 1822 and died in the year 1896, while the mother, whose birth occurred in 1820, passed away in 1894. They were married in Denmark and in 1866 became residents of Yorkville Township, Racine County, where Mr. Kamper rented land. Subsequently he purchased a farm in Raymond Township, a tract of fifty acres, which he carefully and successfully cultivated. He was a member of the Lutheran church in early life, but after coming to Wisconsin joined the Baptist church. He never became allied with any political party, but cast an independent ballot. The Kamper family is of German lineage, for the paternal grandfather, Hans Kamper, was born in Germany, whence he removed to Denmark. J. H. Kamper is the only survivor of a family of six children. He pursued a district school education and when his textbooks were put aside, concentrated his efforts upon farm work, to which he has since given his attention. He was married in 1885 to Miss Ella Adland, a daughter of Knud and Phoebe (Drought) Adland. Her father located at North Cape, Wisconsin, in 1840, and established the first store there. He was postmaster for thirty-two years and gave it the name of North Cape in honor of North Cape in Norway, from which country he and most of the other early settlers of the town came. It has the distinction of being the only town of that...

Biography of Martin O. Senseny

Martin O. Senseny, president and treasurer of the Racine Malleable & Wrought Iron Company, has been connected with this business since 1906 and its development within the past decade is attributable in substantial measure to his efforts and keen business discernment. A native of Pennsylvania, Mr. Senseny was born in 1852, a son of Jacob and Elizabeth Senseny. His mother died when he was but a few weeks old and his father when the boy was but three years of age, so that he was reared by his grandparents. He became a school teacher and later a bookkeeper and for a time was associated with the Eberhard Company, of Cleveland, Ohio, but in 1906 removed to Racine and purchased an interest in the Racine Malleable & Wrought Iron Company, which had been organized in 1884. The present officers are: O. Senseny, president and treasurer: W. H. Houssman, of Cleveland, vice president, and Charles Van Ornum, secretary. The plant is located at Twenty-first and South Clark streets, where the company owns ten acres of ground with buildings covering half of that amount. The original plant was located on the north side, but was burned in July, 1898, and at that time the company selected the present location, erecting two story buildings in which they installed modern equipment to facilitate the work. In June, 1915, a cyclone struck the plant and demolished the top story of all four of the buildings, causing a loss of about thirty-five thousand dollars. They employ two hundred and fifty men, most of whom are skilled workmen, and they manufacture castings, wagon and carriage hardware, harness...

Biographical Sketch of George Gray

George Gray, of Scotland, emigrated to America previous to the revolution, and when that war began he joined the American army and served during the entire struggle. He had several brothers in the British army during the same war. Before leaving Scotland, he married Mary Stuart, and they settled first in Philadelphia, but afterward removed to North Carolina, and from there to Bryan’s Station in Kentucky. Here their son Joseph married Nary Finley, and settled in Warren County, Kentucky. In 1818 he removed to Missouri, and settled on Brush creek in Montgomery County, where he died in 1830. His children were Hannah, William, Isaac, George, Sarah, Rachel, James, and Mary. Hannah married Asa Williams, who was an early settler of Montgomery County. William, Isaac and George married sisters, named Price, of Kentucky. William had three children, who settled in Missouri after the death of their parents. Isaac and George also settled in Montgomery County, but the latter removed to Clark County in 1837, where he still resides. Sarah married Stephen Finley, who settled in Wisconsin in 1846. Rachel married John P. Glover, who settled in Oregon. James married Margaret Williams, of Ohio. Mary married Presley Anderson, who died in 1848, and who was Sheriff of Montgomery County at the time. He left a widow and five children, who still live in Montgomery...

Wisconsin Land Patents – Chippewa Tribe

Patentee NameDateDoc. #Accession # CI TA WA SI NO KWE08/06/1908109193-086900 DEFOE, MARY10/12/190879230-0821133 LORD, ALBERT LEO07/11/191042871-10143884 LORD, CHARLES NICHOLAS07/11/191042871-10143884 LORD, CHARLES NICHOLAS10/12/190879230-0821134 LORD, MAGGIE07/11/191042871-10143884 ME-KA-DAY-WE-KE-NA-IA, JOSEPH10/21/1913327324361124 MISHLER, GRACE11/22/190989852-0991010 SAUGIE, SUSAN...

Treaty of February 5, 1856

Whereas by Senate amendment to the treaty with the Menomonees of February [twenty] eighth, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-one, two townships of land on the east side of Winnebago Lake, Territory of Wisconsin, were set aside for the use of the Stockbridge and Munsee tribes of Indians, all formerly of the State of New York, but a part of whom had already removed to Wisconsin; and Whereas said Indianstook possession of said lands, but dissensions existing among them led to the treaty of September third, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-nine, by which the east half of said two townships was retroceded to the United States, and in conformity to which a part of said Stockbridges and Munsees emigrated west of the Mississippi; and Whereas to relieve them from dissensions still existing by “An act for the relief of the Stockbridge tribe of Indians in the Territory of Wisconsin,” approved March third, one thousand eight hundred and forty-three, it was provided, that the remaining townships of land should be divided into lots and allotted between the individual members of said tribe; and Whereas a part of said tribe refused to be governed by the provisions of said act, and a subsequent act was passed on the sixth day of August, one thousand eight hundred and forty-six, repealing the aforementioned act, but without making provision for bona fide purchasers of lots in the townships subdivided in conformity to the said first-named act; and Whereas it was found impracticable to carry into effect the provisions of the last-mentioned act, and to remedy all difficulties, a treaty was entered into on...

Treaty of February 27, 1855

Articles of agreement and convention, made and concluded at Washington City on the twenty-seventh day of February, eighteen hundred and fifty-five, between George W. Manypenny, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the following-named chiefs and delegates representing the Winnebago tribe of Indians, viz: Waw-kon- chaw-koo-kaw, The Coming Thunder, or Kinnoshik; Sho-go-nik-kaw, or Little Hill; Maw-he-coo-shah-naw-zhe-kaw, One that Stands and Reaches the Skies, or Little Decorie; Waw-kon-chaw-hoo-no-kaw, or Little Thunder; Hoonk-hoo-no-kaw, Little Chief, or Little Priest; Honch-hutta-kaw, or Big Bear; Wach-ha-ta-kaw, or Big Canoe; Ha-zum-kee-kaw, or One Horn; Ha-zee-kaw, or Yellow Bank; and Baptiste Lassallier, they being thereto duly authorized by said tribe: Article 1. The Winnebago Indians hereby cede, sell, and convey to the United States all their right, title, and interest in, and to, the tract of land granted to them pursuant to the third article of the treaty concluded with said tribe, at Washington City, on the thirteenth day of October, one thousand eight hundred and forty-six, lying north of St. Peter’s River and west of the Mississippi River, in the Territory of Minnesota, and estimated to contain about eight hundred and ninety-seven thousand and nine hundred (897,900) acres; the boundary-lines of which are thus described, in the second article of the treaty concluded between the United States and the Chippewa Indians of the Mississippi and Lake Superior, on the second day of August, one thousand eight hundred and forty seven, viz: “Beginning at the junction of the Crow Wing and Mississippi Rivers; thence, up the Crow Wing River, to the junction of that river with the Long Prairie River; thence, up the Long...

Treaty of May 12, 1854

Articles of agreement made and concluded at the Falls of Wolf River, in the State of Wisconsin, on the twelfth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four, between the United States of America, by Francis Huebschmann, superintendent of Indian affairs, duly authorized thereto, and the Menomonee tribe of Indians, by the chiefs, headmen, and warriors of said tribe—such articles being supplementary and amendatory to the treaty made between the United States and said tribe on the eighteenth day of October, one thousand eight hundred and forty-eight. Whereas, among other provisions contained in the treaty in the caption mentioned, it is stipulated that for and in consideration of all the lands owned by the Menomonees, in the State of Wisconsin, wherever situated, the United States should give them all that country or tract of land ceded by the Chippewa Indians of the Mississippi and Lake Superior, in the treaty of the second of August, eighteen hundred and forty-seven, and by the Pillager band of Chippewa Indians in the treaty of the twenty-first of August, eighteen hundred and forty-seven, which had not been assigned to the Winnebagoes, guarantied not to contain less than six hundred thousand acres; should pay them forty thousand dollars for removing and subsisting themselves; should give them fifteen thousand dollars for the establishment of a manual-labor school, the erection of a grist and saw mill, and for other necessary improvements in their new country; should cause to be laid out and expended in the hire of a miller, for the period of fifteen years, nine thousand dollars; and for continuing and keeping up a blacksmith...

Treaty of November 24, 1848

Whereas by an act of Congress entitled “An act for the relief of the Stockbridge tribe of Indians, in the Territory of Wisconsin,” approved on the third day of March, A. D. 1843, it was provided that the township of land on the east side of Winnebago Lake, secured to said tribe by the treaty with the Menomonee Indians of February 8th, 1831, as amended by the Senate of the United States, and not heretofore ceded by said tribe to the United States, should be divided and allotted among the individual members of said tribe, by commissioners to be elected for that purpose, who were to make report of such division and allotment, and thereupon the persons composing said tribe were to become citizens of the United States. And whereas a portion of said tribe refused to recognize the validity of said act of Congress, or the proceedings which were had under it, or to be governed by its provisions, and upon their petition a subsequent act was passed by the Congress of the United States, on the 6th day of August, 1846, repealing the said act of March 3d, 1843, and providing, among other things, that such of said tribe as should enroll themselves with the subagent of Indians affairs at Green Bay, should be and remain citizens of the United States, and the residue of said tribe were restored to their ancient form of government as an Indian tribe. It was also provided that the said township of land should be divided into two districts, one of which was to be known as the “Indian district,” the...
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