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Wisconsin WW2 NMCG Casualty List – L Surnames

LAACK,  Wulfurth Jerome, Motor machinist’s mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Laack, 8909 W. Maple St., West Allis. LACASSE, Edward Marcey, Seaman 1c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Maude Lacasse, Downe College, Milwaukee. (Later Address, 103 Sly st., Luzerne, Pa.) LACHMUND, Edwin, Ensign, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. Lachmund, Sr., Sauk City. LADEMAN,  Jerome Emmett, Signalman 3c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Natalie Duero Lademan, 1810 W. Wisconsin Ave., Milwaukee. LAFFIN, Wallace H., Pfc., USMC. Mother, Mrs. Corrine Laffin, Rt. 2, Wausau. LAIDLAW, Robert John, Machinist’s ate 3c, USN. Guardians, Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Jamieson, Rt. 1, Thiensville. LAKATOS, Emil Joseph, Machinist’s mate 3c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Helen Catherine Lakatos, 1020 Madison St., Manitowoc. LAMBERT, Melvin Theodore, Watertender 1c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Eileen Veronica Lambert, 2009 E. 8th St., Superior. LAMBERT, William H., Jr., 2d Lieutenant, USMCR. Wife, Mrs. William E. Lambert, Jr., 2005 E. Beverly Rd., Milwaukee. LAMPING, Michael Frank, Fireman 2c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Regina L. Lamping, 1431 N. 20th St., Milwaukee. LANDAAL, Henry Byron, Lt. (jg) Medical Corps, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. George John Landaal, Waupun. LANG, Alexander O., Pvt., USMC. Mother, Mathilda Lang, Rt. 1, Box 264, Marathon. LANGWORTHY, Sterling O., Pvt., USMC. Mother, Mrs. Tessie Langworthy, Rt. 6, Chippewa Falls. LA PORTE, Sam Philip, Pharmacist’s mate 3c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Virginia LaPorte, 420 E. Reservoir Ave., Milwaukee. LARSEN, Gordon Valdemar, Pfc., USMCR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chris P. Larsen, Rt. 3, Hayward. LARSEN, Harlan Doyle, Pfc., USMCR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. William M. Larsen, 1235 E. Seeley St., Milwaukee. LARSEN, Melvin Leonard, Radioman 2c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Lois Ann Seitz Larsen, 2018 LaSalle St.,...

American Baker Genealogies

The following page consists of short genealogies of American Baker families. Genealogy of Daniel Baker Genealogy of Eber Baker of Marion Ohio Genealogy of Edward Baker of Saugus Massachusetts Genealogy of Edward D. Baker of Salem Massachusetts Genealogy of Elleazer Baker of Dutchess County NY Genealogy of George Baker of Pownal Vermont Genealogy of Howard Baker of Solon Maine Genealogy of Joseph Baker of Marshfield Massachusetts Genealogy of Nicholas Baker of Scituate Massachusetts Genealogy of Thomas Baker of East Hampton Connecticut Genealogy of Alexander Baker L156 ALEXANDER BAKER: b. 1607; d. ?; came to America in 1635 and settled in Boston. Later the family moved to Conn. L157. JOSHUA BAKER: b. 1642; d. 1717; m. Hannah Minturn. L158. JOSHUA BAKER: b. 1677; d. 1740; m. Marion Hurburt. L159 JOSHUA BAKER: b. 1706; d. 1770; m. Phoebe Wilkwire. L160 JARED BAKER: b. 1746; d. 1822; m. Phoebe Harris. L161 ANIEL BAKER: b. 1770; d. 1851; m. Sarah Raymond. L162 DANIEL ALBERT: b. 1810; m. Harriet Vander Cook; moved to Ohio. Daniel Albert: m. Arabella Benson. Annie Louise: b. 1870; m. Charles Pearsall. Charles. Marion; m. Emerson Goodrich. Arabella; b. 1920. Joeleen; b. 1923. James. Isabel; m. John Fike. Amos. Anna L. Marion S.: b. 1872; d. 1927; m. Dr. Eugene Beodles. Howell N.: b. 1877; m. 1907 to Maude Jessup. Carolyn S.: b. 1909. Howell North; b. 1910. George R.: b. 1884; m. Marie Behin. George R.: b. 1910. A. Read; b. 1882; m. Ion Hayward. Mayme: b. 1914. John R.: b. 1916. Katherine: b. 1918. George R.: m. Celia Ashmun. Ch.: Frederick A., Harry C., Charles, Katherine. Annie Louise;...

Algonquian Pictography

Pictorial inscriptions of the character of the Muzzinabiks of the Western Indians, particularly of those of the Algonquin type of languages, are to be traced eastward from Lake Superior and the sources of the Mississippi, on the back line of their migration, through Lake Huron, by its northern communications, to the shores of the Northern Atlantic. One of these has been previously alluded to as existing on the Straits of St. Mary’s, and it is believed that the art will be found to have been in use, and freely employed at all periods of their history, embracing the residence of then ancestors on the shores of the Atlantic. The ancient inscription existing at the mouth of the Assonet or Taunton River (Dighton Rock), between the States of Rhode Island and Massachusetts, is believed to be a record, essentially, of this symbolic character, inscribed around an old Scandinavian inscription. It is found that very few essential changes in their forest arts or character have taken place among the North American tribes for several centuries. There is scarcely anything more worthy of remark than this general fixity of character, and indisposition to change, or adopt any new traits, or abandon any old ones. The state of a society, simple and erratic, and molded together on the basis of petty predatory wars and hunting, did not demand extraordinary efforts. The arts that sufficed one gene ration sufficed the next. There was always a sanctity, in their localities, and a strong appeal to prejudice in a reference to ancestral customs, and to places of actual residence and achievements. There was never a more...

Biography of Gay Hayden

MR. AND MRS. GAY HAYDEN. – Prominent among the many pioneers of the Pacific Northwest who deserve an enduring place in its history are Mr. and Mrs. Hayden of Vancouver, Washington, whose heroism under the many difficulties that beset the emigrants who broke the way for advancing civilization on this far frontier will seem to generations yet unborn, who are destined to read these pages, more like the dream of the novelist than a recital of fact. Mrs. Mary J. Hayden, who at this writing is a handsome, well-preserved and charmingly vivacious woman, as ready-witted, graceful and gentle as though border life had never been her portion, was born in the year 1830 in Athens, Maine, and spent her early childhood with her grandparents in the town of Cornville in that state. At the age of fifteen Miss Bean emigrated with her parents to the wilds of Wisconsin, where she was married in 1847 to Gay Hayden, one of the well-known pioneers of the Pacific Northwest, with whom her lot was cast; and, in the year 1850, they emigrated to that part of Oregon Territory to be known in future as the State of Washington. In recounting her experiences in crossing the plains with teams of oxen, Mrs. Hayden says; “We traveled leisurely at first, but wearily, as the roads were bad in early spring, and accommodation for ourselves and teams could be had at night in the spare settlements, through which we thought it safer not to hurry. But, when we launched out in the open prairie beyond the settlements, we enjoyed a sense of freedom and exhilaration...

Biography of Francis Xavier Paquet

FRANCIS X. PAQUET. – Francis Xavier Paquet, son of Joseph Paquet and Marie Madaline Godant, was born in the parish of Saint John, about thirty miles west of Quebec, at the junction of the Jacquarka river with the St. Lawrence. Joseph Paquet was a stonemason by trade, but lived on a farm and took jobs of stonework. He was the father of eighteen children, nine boys and nine girls. F.X. Paquet, the sixteenth child in order, was born on the fifteenth day of January, 1811. He learned the trade of shipbuilding at Quebec, being apprenticed to Peter Labbe when not quite fourteen years of age. When seventeen years of age, he emigrated to the Untied States, engaging himself to the American Fur Company, to go to Mackinaw and construct a schooner for said company. After the schooner was completed he took charge of her and engaged in boating wood from Linwood Island and Round Island, and also made a trip to Chicago to get oak timber for staves and for building small boats called Mackinaw boats. This schooner was named Eliza Stewart, after the wife of Robert Stewart, who was the head man of the American Fur Company at Mackinaw at that time. That was in 1828. Old man Beaubien was then head man at what was afterwards Chicago, and which then consisted of three or four small log houses, one being a storehouse, and another being occupied by men who were employed getting out staves and making lumber with ship-saws. These staves were for making five-gallon kegs to hold and transport alcohol, out of which whisky was made...

Charles Henry Wyman Genealogy

Charles Henry4 Wyman, b. in Barnard, Vt., Jan. 30, 1863; son of Elliot and Hester (Woodward) Wyman; m. June 15, 1890, at Barre, Mass., Martha Robinson, b. in Barre, June 5, 1865; dau. of Charles and Mary Stearns (Henry) Robinson. This Charles Henry was son of Elliot Wyman of Barnard, Vt.; who was the son of Ira Wyman of Stockbridge, Vt.; who was the son of Jasher Wyman of Stockbridge, who came there from Athens, Vt. The ch. of Charles H. and Hester were: Carl Robinson5, b. Summit, Wis., July 2, 1891. Herbert Harland5, b. East Jaffrey, Dec. 17, 1898. Mary Hester5, b. Oct. 8,...

Wisconsin County Courthouse Addresses

Wisconsin State Vital Records Office Wisconsin Division of Health Vital Records P.O. Box 309 Madison, WI 53701-0309 (608) 266-1371 Adams County PO Box 278 Friendship, WI 53934 (608) 339-4200 Marathon County 500 Forest Street Wausau, WI 54403-5554 (715) 261-1500 Ashland County 201 West Main St Ashland, WI 54806-1652 (715) 682-7000 Marinette County 1926 Hall Ave Marinette, WI 54143-1717 (715) 732-7406 Barron County 330 E LaSalle Ave Barron, WI 54812-1540 (715) 537-6200 Marquette County P.O. Box 186, 77 W Park St Montello, WI 53949-0186 (608) 297-9114 Bayfield County 117 E 5th St Washburn, WI 54891-9464 (715) 373-6100 Menominee County P.O. Box 279 Keshena, WI 54135-0278 (715) 799-3311 Brown County PO Box 23600 Green Bay, WI 54305-3600 (920) 448-4016 Milwaukee County 901 N 9th Street Milwaukee, WI 53233-1425 (414) 278-4070 Buffalo County P.O. Box 494 Alma, WI 54610 (608) 685-6234 Monroe County Administrative Center 112 South Court Sparta, WI 54656 (608) 269-8705 Burnett County 7410 County Road K Siren, WI 54872 (715) 349-2173 Oconto County 301 Washington Street Oconto, WI 54153-1699 (920) 834-6806 Calumet County 206 Court Street Chilton, WI 53014-1127 (920) 849-2361 Oneida County P.O. Box 400 Rhinelander, WI 54501-0400 (715) 369-6144 Chippewa County 711 North Bridge Street Chippewa Falls, WI 54729 (715) 726-7980 Outagamie County 410 South Walnut Street Appleton, WI 54911 (920) 832-1895 Clark County 517 Court Street Neillsville, WI 54456-1971 (715) 743-5148 Ozaukee County P.O. Box 994 Port Washington, WI 53074-0994 (414) 284-9411 Columbia County P.O. Box 133 Portage, WI 53901-0177 (608) 742-9654 Pepin County P.O. Box 39 Durand, WI 54736-0039 (715) 672-8704 Crawford County 220 North Beaumont Road Prairie Du Chien, WI 53821 (608) 326-0200 Pierce...

Wisconsin Vital Records

Vital records, as their name suggests, are connected with central life events: birth, marriage, and death. Maintained by civil authorities, they are prime sources of genealogical information; but, unfortunately, official vital records are available only for relatively recent periods. These records, despite their recent creation in the United States, are critically important in genealogical research, often supplying details on family members well back into the nineteenth century. The Source: A Guidebook of American Genealogy, by Loretto Szucs and Sandra Luebking. Ancestry.com  Wisconsin State Database A large collection of databases of births, deaths, marriages, census, obituaries, directories, estate records, and service records. Deaths Ancestry.com  Wisconsin Deaths, 1820-1907 This database indexes over 435,000 deaths recorded in the state of Wisconsin prior to 1907. Wisconsin is one of few states to have a wide-spread index of records prior to establishment of a state vital records office. However, it is important to note that there will be some records at the county level not included in this statewide index. Taken from the index created by the Wisconsin Department of Health and Family Services, Vital Records Division this database will prove useful to those seeking ancestors in early Wisconsin. (Requires Ancestry.com Membership) Get 14 Days Free Access!!! Wisconsin State Vital Records Office Wisconsin Division of Health Vital Records P.O. Box 309 Madison, WI 53701-0309 (608) 266-1371 Make check or money order payable to Vital Records. Include a letter noting relationship of person on certificate to person requesting certificate; reason for requesting the certificate; full name of person on certificate; date of birth or death; city/county of event; parents name including mother’s maiden name for...

Biography of Natley Dutton

Natley Dutton and wife, of England, settled in Maryland some time after Lord Baltimore began to colonize that State. Their son, Natley, Jr., was born and raised in Maryland. He had a son, named John H., who was born in 1790. Mr. Dutton died when his son was eleven years of age, and two years afterward his mother had him bound out to learn the ship carpenter’s trade. He worked at that business fourteen years. In the meantime his mother had married a Mr. Elton, whose father was a Quaker and came to America with William Penn. They had a son named Thomas T. Elton, and in 1818, he and his half-brother, John H. Dutton, in company with Philip Glover, started to Missouri. They traveled in a wagon to Wheeling, Virginia, where they bought a flat-boat, and loading their wagon and team into it, they floated clown to Maysville, Kentucky, where they traded their flat-boat for a keel-boat, transferred their property to it, and proceeded to Louisville. There they sold their boat and came by land to Missouri. They located first in St. Charles County, where they rented land and lived two years. They then entered land on North Bear creek, in Montgomery County, and settled there. Mr. Elton married Eleanor Glover, and raised a large family of children. He subsequently removed to Grant County, Wisconsin, where he now resides. Mr. Dutton married Mary Bruin, of St. Charles County, whose father settled there in 1808. They had John H., Jr., Eveline, Timothy B., Eleanor, James M., and Elizabeth. The two latter lived to be grown, but died unmarried. John...

Illinois Indian Land

With the rapid increase of a white population between the Lakes and the Mississippi, which followed the conclusion of hostilities with England and her Indian allies, new difficulties began to arise between the natives and the settlers. Illinois and Wisconsin were inhabited by various tribes of Indians, upon terms of bitter hostility among themselves, but united in their suspicions and apprehensions at the unprecedented inroads of emigrants from the east. The Winnebago, dwelling in Wisconsin; the Pottawatomie, situated around the southern extremity of Lake Michigan; and the Sac, (afterwards mingled with the Foxes, and usually coupled with that tribe,) of Illinois, principally located upon Rock River, were the most considerable of these north-western tribes. By various cessions, the United States acquired, in the early part of the present century, a title to extensive tracts of country, lying east of the Mississippi, and included in the present state of Illinois. The tribes who sold the land were divided in opinion; great numbers of the occupants of the soil were utterly opposed to its alienation, and denied the authority of the chiefs, by whose negotiation the sales or cessions were effected; and upon the parceling out and the sale by the United States government of this public property to private individuals, conflicting claims soon led to serious disturbances. In July, of 1830, a treaty was formed at Prairie du Chien, between United States commissioners and the tribes of the Iowas, Sioux, Omawha, Sacs and Foxes, &c., for the purpose of finally arranging the terms upon which the lands east of the Mississippi should be yielded up. The Sac chief, Keokuk, was...
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