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Washington First Legislative Assembly

The first legislative assembly was composed of nine councilmen, as follows: Clarke County, Daniel F. Bradford and William H. Tappan; Island and Jefferson County, William T. Sayward; Lewis and Pacific County, Seth Catlin and Henry Miles; Pierce and King County, Lafayette V. Balch and G. N. McConaha; Thurston, D. R. Bigelow and B. F. Yantis. H. M. Frost of Pierce County was elected chief clerk, and U. E. Hicks of Thurston County, assistant clerk. Hicks was County Clerk of Thurston. He figured a good deal in polities, served in the Indian war of 1855-6, and afterward edited one or more newspapers. He immigrated to Washington from Missouri in 1850, with his young wife, who died Nov. 16, 1853, aged 21 years. He married, Jan. 21, 1855, India Ann Hartsock. Frost served but a part of the term, and resigned, when Elwood Evans was elected and served from March 8th to May 1st. – J. L. Mitchell of Lewis County was elected Sergeant-at-Arms W. G. Osborn of Thurston County Doorkeeper. The council being divided into three classes by lot. D. R. Bigelow, Seth Catlin, and W. H. Tappan drew the three years term; B. F. Yantis, Henry Miles, and G. N. McConaha, the two years term; W. T. Sayward, D. F. Bradford, and L. Balch, the one year term. The House of Representatives consisted of seventeen members: One from Island County County, S. D. Howe (Whig); Five from Clarke County, J. D. Biles, F. A. Chenoweth, A. J. Bolan, Henry R. Crosbie, and A. Lee Lewis (Whig); One from Lewis County, H. D. Huntington (Whig) John R. Jackson and F....

Steamboats, Tug Boats and River Craft in Washington

The first charter granted to a steamboat company on the Cowlitz River was to Seth Catlin, John R. Jackson, Fred A. Clarke, Henry N. Peers, George B. Roberts, and their successors, by the legislature of 1854-5. Wash. Stat., 1854, 439. This company failed to make any use of its charter. The legislature of 1858-9 granted to Royal C. Smith and Noyes H. Smith and their associates permission to incorporate the Cowlitz River Steam Navigation Company, for the purpose of improving the bed of the Cowlitz River, and keeping upon it a steamboat or boats suitable for carrying freight and passengers between the two points named, upon condition that a steamer should be put upon the river within six months, and the obstructions removed in nine months, failing to do which they forfeited their charter. But this company also failed to accomplish its object. Upon condition of improving and navigating the river, the legislature of 1862-3 granted to Nathaniel Stone and his associates, under the name of the Monticello and Cowlitz Landing Steamboat Company, the exclusive right to navigate the Cowlitz. This company placed a boat on the river in the spring of 1864, when the Oregon Steam Navigation Company put on an opposition boat. The Rescue and Rainier were built for this trade. The Monticello Company filed a bill against them, and prayed for an injunction. The case was tried before Judge Wyche, who held that the exclusive grant of the legislature was void, because in conflict with the powers of congress to regulate commerce among the several states of the union, and the injunction was denied. S. F....

Washington Insane Asylum

The legislative assembly of 1861-2 authorized the governor and auditor to contract for the care of the insane, the contract being let to the St John lunatic asylum at Vancouver, in charge of the Sisters of Charity. A fund was set aside out of the general fund of the territory to pay for their keeping, and they were kindly cared for. A memorial was forwarded to congress, asking that an appropriation might be made to erect a building somewhere on the Sound which should serve both for a marine hospital, which was needed, and an asylum for the insane. But congress had not responded, when the legislature of 1866-7 passed an act again authorizing the governor and auditor to make contracts for the care of the insane, the contractors giving bonds for the proper performance of their duties, and the law requiring them to report annually to the governor. A board of inspectors was appointed to visit the asylum quarterly, and to audit the accounts submitted by the institution. The patients were removed from St John’s, Vancouver, to a private asylum in charge of James Huntington and son, located in the Cowlitz valley opposite Monticello, where the accommodations were inadequate, and where by the unusual flood of Dec. 1867 the improvements were swept away. It was in reference to these facts that Gov. Moore called for a radical change in the system adopted, and advised the purchase of a farm and the erection of an asylum which would meet the requirements of those suffering from mental diseases, who, with intelligent treatment, might be restored to society. At the session...

Washington Councilmen, 1879

The New Tacoma Herald, Oct. 30, 1879, is my authority for the following condensed biographies: President of the counsel, Francis H. Cook, born in Ohio; age 28; came to the territory in 1871; publisher of the Herald. Elliot Cline, born in Pennsylvania, age 60; immigrated in 1852; farmer by occupation; residence New Dungeness. J. H. Day, born in Virginia, age 60, immigrated in 1862, druggist, residence Walla Walla. S. G. Dudley, born in New York, age 45, immigrated in 1874, farmer, residence Seattle. R. O. Dunbar, born in Illinois, age 45, immigrated in 1846, lawyer, residence Goldendale. J. B. La Du, born in New York, age 45, immigrated in 1853, farmer, residence Mount Coffin. John McGlynn, born in Ireland, age 34, came in 1872, hotel- keeper, residence La Conner. L. M. Ringer, born in Virginia, age 44, came in 1873, merchant, residence Almota. A. F. Tullis, born in Indiana, age 49, immigrated in 1852, farmer, residence Chehalis. Allen Weir, chief clerk, born in California, age 25, came in 1860, publisher, residence Port Townsend. Samuel Greene, assistant clerk, born in Massachusetts, age 42, came in 1874, farmer, residence Seattle. W. R. Andrews, enrolling clerk, born in Michigan, age 28, came in 1861, lawyer, residence La Conner. Emma Knighton, born in Oregon, age 21, came in 1860, residence Olympia. J. H. Wilt, sergeant-at-arms, born in Ohio, age 26, came in 1876, teacher, residence Walla Walla. G. W. Brant, doorkeeper, born in Missouri, age 25, came in 1852, wheelwright, residence Vancouver. Ruth Bigelow, messenger, born in the territory, age 19, residence Olympia. Robert Wilson, watchman, born in New York, age 47, immigrated...

Leading Citizens of Spokane Falls Washington

Among the leading citizens of Washington, in addition to those mentioned elsewhere in this volume, the following residents of Spokane Falls are worthy of note: J. N. Glover, a Missourian by birth, and, it may he said, the founder of the city, settling there, or rather on its site, in 1873, and purchasing from two squatters named Downing and Scranton the tract of land on which their shanties were then the only buildings. First as the owner of a saw-mill, next as a contractor, then as the leading organizer and president of the First National Bank, and finally as mayor of Spokane, he has won for himself his well-earned wealth and reputation. In connection with the First National Bank should be mentioned Horace L. Cutter, who was also one of its organizers. A native of Cleveland, Ohio, in 1871 he removed to Colorado, on account of his health, and in the following year to California, where for eight years he was secretary of the San Jose Savings Bank. Settling at Spokane Falls in 1882, he was appointed cashier and manager of the First National, and has since been a promoter of several leading enterprises, as the electric light and cable-road companies. Ile was also one of the founders of the board of trade, of which he is treasurer, and of the public library, of which he is president. The president and manager of the Traders’ National Bank is E. J. Briekell, a native of Indiana, bat most of whose lifetime has been passed in Illinois and Nevada, where he engaged in merchandising and lumbering. In 1884 he settled at...

University of Washington, 1862

The legislature, in Jan. 1862, re-incorporated the university, which was previously chartered in 1860 while it was located on the Cowlitz prairie, creating a board of regents consisting of Daniel Bagley, Paul K. Hubbs, J. P. Keller, John Webster, E. Carr, Frank Clark, G. A. Meigs, Columbia Lancaster, and C. H. Hale, in whom was vested the government of the institution. Three regents were to be elected each year, the length of the terms of the first nine to be determined by lot. In case of a vacancy the governor might appoint. The regents had power to elect a president of the board, and a president of the faculty; to fix the number of assistants, and determine their salaries. They could remove either, and could appoint a secretary, librarian, treasurer, and steward, and remove the same; but the treasurer could never be, in any ease, a member of the board of regents. They were entitled to hold all kinds of estate, real, personal, or mixed, which they might acquire by purchase, donation, or devise. The money received for the sale of lands or otherwise was to be paid to the treasurer, and as much as was necessary expended by the regents in keeping up the buildings and defraying expenses; the treasurer only to give bonds, in the sum of $15,000 to the governor. There was also a board of visitors to consist of three persons, and both regents and visitors were to receive pay out of the university fund for their actual and necessary expenses, all orders on the treasurer to be signed by the secretary and countersigned by...

Biography of Bezaleel Freeman Kendall

Bezaleel Freeman Kendall, like Elwood Evans, crossed the continent in 1853 with Stevens. He was a native of Oxford, Maine, and a graduate of Bowdoin College. His talents are highly praised by all his biographers. Evans, who knew him well, says that he possessed a grand physique, was a fine scholar, able writer, powerful speaker, hard student, and of thorough integrity, but ambitions, aristocratic in his feelings, bitter in his prejudices, and indiscreet in his utterances. The newspapers cannot too highly paint his contempt for the opinions of others, his bitterness of expression, his unqualified style of assault upon any with whom he differed. He carried this strong individuality into a journal, which he edited, called the Overland Press, and which was the occasion of his death, Jan. 7, 1863. Kendall had been clerk of the legislature, territorial librarian, prosecuting attorney of the Olympian Jud. Dist; had been sent on a secret mission by Gen. Scott, and appointed Indian agent in the Yakima country, but soon removed on account of his imperiousness. After his removal he published the Press, and used it to attack whomsoever he hated. He was the attorney and warm friend of George B. Roberts of the Puget Sound Co. On the 25th of October an attempt was made to burn the buildings of this company on Cowlitz farm. Kendall boldly charged the incendiaries on Horace Howe, a farmer residing on the Cowlitz, who, on the 20th of Dec. 1S62, met Kendall in Olympia and struck him over the head with a small stick, in resentment. Kendall retreated, and Howe pursued, when Kendall drew a pistol...

Biographical Sketch of I. L. Scammon

Another Chehalis County pioneer is I. L. Scammon, who was born in Maine in 1822, came to California in 1849-50, making the voyage on the 63-ton schooner Little Traveler. In the autumn of 1850 he took passage for the Columbia River, which was passed by mistake, the vessel making Shoalwater bay. Making his way overland to the Columbia, he went to Salem, Oregon, and to the southern mines, but returning to Washington Territory took a donation claim on the Chehalis River, where the old town of Montesano, now known as Wynoochee, grew up about him. He married Miss Lorinda Hopkins in 1844, who rejoined him in Washington Territory in 1859. The first sermon preached in the region of Montesano was delivered by Rev. J. W. Goodell at Scammon’s house, and the second school in the county was on his place, in 1859. The children of this pioneer are: Harriet, married Edward Campbell. George, m. Clara Nye. Cornelia Jane, who died. Eva, who m. I. R. Edwards. Edith, who m. P. B. Briscoe. Elli, who m. Charles H. Finmet, County Surveyor. Norman, who accidentally shot himself when about 17 years of...

Biography of Charles Biles

Charles Biles was born in Warren County, Tennessee, in Aug. 1809, and reared on a farm in North Carolina, removing when 19 years old to Christian County, Kentucky. In 1832 he married, and in 1835 removed to Illinois, soon returning to Hopkins County, Kentucky, where he resided until 1853, when he emigrated to Washington Territory in company with his brother James, their families, and C. B. Baker, Elijah Baker, and William Downing, and their families, being a part of the first direct immigration to the territory, via the wagon road through the Nachess pass. Mr Biles settled upon Grand Mound Prairie in Thurston County, farming, and sometimes preaching as a minister of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He died Feb. 26, 1869, leaving two sons (one having died after emigrating) and two daughters, namely, David F., Charles N., Mrs M. Z. Goodell, and Mrs I. B. Ward. David F. Biles was born in Kentucky in 1833, coming with his parents to Washington Territory. In 1851 he took a claim in Thurston County, and in 1855 became a deputy U. S. Surveyor, but the Indian war coming on interrupted work, and he took to soldiering in defense of the settlements, resuming his surveying when peace was restored. From 1838 to 1862 he resided in Cosmopolis, Chehalis County, but then removed to a homestead claim near Elma, on the line of the Satsop railroad to Gray Harbor, where he owns 400 acres of land. He served many years as county surveyor, and some time as school superintendent. He married in 1854 Miss Mary J. Hill, who was a member of the immigration...

Washington Blockhouses or Stockades erected during Indian War

There were 22 block-houses or stockades erected by the settlers during the war, as follows1 : at Davis’ Skookum Chuck Henness, near Mound prairie on Tenalcut prairie, at Nathan Eaton’s #1 on Chambers’ prairie #2 on Chambers’ prairie at Bush’s Goodell’s Ruddell’s Rutledge’s #1 at Tumwater #2 at Tumwater one at Dofflemeyer’s one on Whidbey Island one at Port Gamble one on the Cowlitz (Fort Arkansas) one on Mime prairie, one at Port Ludlow, one at Meigs’ Mill, #1 at the Cascades #2 at the Cascades one at Boisford prairie. Others were subsequently erected by the volunteers and troops, to the number of 35 by the former and 4 by the latter, or 62 in all. One at Cowlitz landing French settlement near Cowlitz farm Chehalis River below the Skookum Chuck Tenalcut plain (Fort Miller) Yelm prairie (Fort Stevens) Lowe’s, on Chambers’ prairie #1 at Olympia #2 at Olympia one at Packwood’s ferry (Fort Raglan) #1 at Montgomery’s crossing of the Puyallup (Fort White) #2 at Montgomery’s crossing of the Puyallup (Fort White) #1 at Connell’s prairie #2 at Connell’s prairie #1 at crossing of White River #2 at crossing of White River South prairie (Fort McAllister) on the Dwamish (Fort Lander) Lone Tree point on the Snohomish (Fort Ebey) on the Snoqualimich below the falls (Fort Tilton) on the Snoqualimich above the falls (Fort Alden) Port Townsend Wilson’s Point Bellingham Bay Skookum Chuck Vancouver Fourth prairie (near Vancouver) Washougal Lewis River Walla Walla (Fort Mason) Michel’s fork of Nisqually (Fort Preston) Klikitat prairie near Cowlitz The regular companies built: Fort Slaughter, on Muckleshoot prairie Fort Maloney, on Puyallup...
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