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Descendants of Veranus Filoon of North Bridgewater, MA

For several generation the family bearing the name of Filoon has live in Abington and North Bridgewater (now Brockton), where evidence of their thrift, solidity and respectability are manifest, and there also have lived the Bretty and Fullerton families, with which the more recent generations of the Filoons have been allied through marriage, the Brett family being one of the ancient families of the Old Colony and its progenitor an original proprietor of Bridgewater. This article is to particularly treat of the branch of the Filoon family to which belonged the late Veranus Filoon, who was long and prominently identified with the business and social circles of North Bridgewater and Brockton, and his son, the present Fred W. Filoon, who as his father’s successor is continuing the business with marked success, as well as the former’s brother, the present Henry H. Filoon, who has long been a leading and successful practicing dentist.

A Record of the Agee Family

James W. Agee wrote this pamphlet as a way to publish the vital records of every known Agee. Unfortunately, at the time of publication, he estimates to have received only a quarter of responses to the cards he sent out. Since he only asked for vital records, that’s all he presents in this manuscript. He claims all living Agee’s, except one, could claim descent from “the 24” who were the 24 children of James and Anthony Agee: Noah, James, Jacob, John, Hercules, Joseph, Rhoda, Ruth, Celia, Mary, Chloe, and Nancy, all children of James Agee; and Joshua, James, Daniel, Matthew, Jacob, John, Isaac, Joseph, Reuben, Anthony, Noah, and an unnamed daughter who married a ? Christian, all children of Andrew Agee.

Hart Family of Orange County NC

This is a self published manuscript of the Hart Family from Orange County, North Carolina.

The great ancestor of the Hart family in the United States emigrated from London about 1690 and settled in Hanover County, Virginia, where he died leaving an only son, Thomas Hart, who was about eleven years of age when his father arrived in Virginia. Of the elder Thomas little is known except that he was a merchant and probably late in life, a blind man. This manuscript begins with the son, Thomas Hart, Jr. who married Susanna Rice. After the death of Thomas Jr., Susanna and all of her children: Thomas, John, Benjamin, David, Nathaniel, and Ann, moved to Orange County, North Carolina.

Appalachian Colonists from the Mediterranean Basin

Throughout the Southeastern United States can be found “old families” in rural areas whose appearance is not quite the same as the European or African peoples who colonized the region, but also not what a person with substantial indigenous ancestry looks like either. In earlier times they might have called themselves Cajun, Black Irish, Redbone, Black Dutch, Portughee, Old Spanish, Melungeon or Part Injun. In more recent years they are likely to say that their great-grandmother was a full blooded Choctaw, Cherokee, Creek, Chickasaw, Catawba, Shawnee or Blackfoot. She may have been, but that is not always the case. Many of these people have Mediterranean features, not Native American. One group of mestizos in the Southeast receives very little publicity. Their families have vague memories of either being Jewish or having some Jewish ancestors during the Colonial or Federal Periods. These families may even have Jewish surnames such as Abram, Alba, Amos, Bachman, Benjamin, Boone, Cowen, Hite, Luby, Cohen, David, Gabby, Hershey, Rich, Jacobs, Jordan, Kaufman, Lombard, Levy, Meyer, Shapiro, Spiker, Rosenberg, Sherman, Solomon, Oliver, etc. but they have been practicing Christians for so long that they don’t even realize that their names are of Jewish origin. There is usually no way of discerning these families’ Jewish heritage by physical appearance because Americans, by nature, are hybrids. In contrast, the mountain valleys of northeastern Tennessee, northwestern Virginia, southeastern Kentucky, southwestern Virginia and southern Virginia contain a mestizo population that has maintained a separate identity for 250 years. Some families called themselves Cherokees. Some families called themselves Portughee. More and more they now call themselves Melungeons.   All along, however, they...

Cindy Henderson’s DNA Results

My mother is of Irish/German and Italian ancestry. Her father is a 1st generation Italian, the family is from Abruzzo Italy. The colonial line, her mother who is partially Irish/German was from Roane, TN. Her (grandmother) father’s family is from Old Fort McDowell NC. They moved to the Tennessee area. My father’s maternal line, his mother was Black American and born NJ. Her father (my great grandfather), I don’t know his origins other than he was Black. Her mother (my great grandmother) was born in Washington DC and moved to NJ. My grandmother’s birth was the result of an extramarital affair and the family knows little about her father’s detailed ancestry. My grandmother’s mother’s father (my 2nd great grandfather) has ancestry that goes back to Virginia/Washington DC/New Jersey area. My grandmother’s mother (my great grandmother), her family is from NJ and are known as Black. My father’s paternal line is from Hendersonville NC. His father (my grandfather) was Black via his mother (my great grandmother). She was from north western South Carolina. American Indian via his father (my great grandfather) who was from Hendersonville, NC. I think I shown a picture of him to you, he was adopted before the age of 2, and living with a foster family along with several other children. I don’t know the circumstances behind his adoption. This was back in 1868. He never went to school and was working at the age of 10. My dad’s grandfather (Indian), from what I was told to by my Aunt, his mother (my 2nd great grandmother) has ties to the Eastern Band of Cherokee. His father...

Genealogy of the Yeargan Family 1730-1890

By the personal efforts of Leonidas Hilary Yeargan and Hilary H. L. Yeargan, two second cousins, who are great-grandsons of the original Rev. Andrew Yeargan, these memoirs have been obtained. The descent in this manuscript starts with Rev. Andrew Yeargan, who came from Wales about the year 1735 and settled in Virginia, ministering in the Roanoke and James River Valley. He married Ony Bowles and raised 10 sons and 1 daughter, namely: Andrew Yeargan, settled in South Carolina and raised two children, who’s identity is lost. John Yeargan,resided in Newbury County SC and raised two sons: John and Wiley. Samuel Yeargan,settled first in Newbury County SC and then Franklin County GA. Had at least one daughter, Sallie. Benjamin Yeargan, married Sarah Morgan, and had 4 children: Charlotte, Mark, Harriet and Bartlett. Would spell his name Yeargain. Jarratt F. Yeargan,married Amelia Patterson, and had 8 children: Benjamin, Patterson, Devereaux, Bartlett, Henry, Chesley, Charlotte and Sarah. Edward Yeargan, settled in Anderson County SC where he and his wife were killed by lightening. Raised a large family of children. James Yeargan,died a bachelor at his brother Devereaux’s house in Greenville County SC. Devereaux Yeargan, married and had the following sons: Andrew, Benjamin, Steven, Rufus and William. Bartlett Yeargan, married and had the following sons: Benjamin, William, Jarratt, Bartlett and Gideon. His descendants would spell their name as Yeargin. Williams Yeargan,married a Miss Bennett, and had the following sons: John, James, Philip and Bennett. His descendants lived in Illinois. Sarah Yeargan, married Burrell Hudson and raised a large family. Early in the 19th century finds Rev. Andrew and Ony Bowles in Greenville South...

North America Indian Names of Places in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, and Louisiana

The Indians all over this continent had names, traditions, religions, ceremonies, feasts, prayers, songs, dances all, more or less, with symbolism and allegory, adapted to circumstances, just as all other races of mankind. But the world has become so familiar with the continued and ridiculous publications in regard to everything touching upon that race of people that a universal doubt has long since been created and established as to the possibility of refinement of thought and nobleness of action ever having existed among the North American Indian race, ancient or modern; and so little of truth has also been learned regarding the real and true inner life of that peculiar and seemingly isolated race of mankind, that today only here and there can one be found who, from a lifetime association and intimate acquaintance, is well versed in Indian thought, feeling and character, and able to unfold and record the solution of that imagined mystery known as “The Indian Problem,” since they learned it from the Indians themselves. From the Indians own lips they were taught its elucidation, and only as it could be taught and learned, but never again can be taught and learned. Even as various nations of antiquity of, the eastern continent have left the evidences of their former occupation by the geographical names that still exist, so to have the North American Indians left their evidences upon the western (in dependent of all written history) that they have likewise possessed this continent during unknown ages of the past. The artificial mounds, fortifications, lakes and ponds with their original names and those of rivers, creeks, mountains,...

Memoirs of the LeFlore Family

The Cravat families of Choctaws are the descendants of John Cravat, a Frenchman, who came among the Choctaws at an early day, and was adopted among them by marriage. He had two daughters by his Choctaw wife, Nancy and Rebecca, both of whom became the wives of Louis LeFlore. His Choctaw wife dying he married a Chickasaw woman, by whom he had four sons, Thomas, Jefferson, William and Charles, and one daughter, Elsie, who married- a white man by the name of Daniel Harris, and who became the parents of Col. J. D. Harris, whose first wife was Catharine Nail, the fourth daughter of Joel H. Nail. The descendants of John Cravat are still among the Choctaws and Chickasaws, and known as prominent and useful citizens in the two nations. The LeFlore family of Choctaws is the descendants of Major Louis LeFlore, and his brother, Michael LeFlore, Canadian Frenchmen, who, after the expulsion of the French from the territories of Mississippi by the English, first settled in Mobile, Ala., then a small trading post. After remaining there a few years, Louis moved to the now state of Mississippi and settled on Pearl River, in the county of Nashoba (Wolf). Thence he moved to the Yazoo Valley, where he lived until he died. As before stated, he married the two daughters of John Cravat, Nancy and Rebecca. By the former he had four sons in the following order of their names: Greenwood, William (who was drowned in Bok Iski-tini), Benjamin and Basil; and five daughters, viz: Clarissa, Emilee the names of the others not remembered. After the death of Nancy he...

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