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Biographical Sketch of D. A. Raybould

One of San Mateo County’s newcomers who has risen to a place of esteem in the community is D. A. Raybould of the San Francisco Chronicle. Mr. Raybould is known in all parts of the county as one of its wide awake, energetic young men who has at heart the welfare of the county as well as the interests of his paper. During the few years that Mr. Raybould has represented the Chronicle in San Mateo county he has enjoyed a reputation for fairness. His news articles have kept the peninsula cities in the foreground and not a day passes that some section of the county is not exploited in the San Francisco press. A few years ago Mr. Raybould wrote the Peninsula Polo Annual, a history of the sport of kings in the county. Through this book which was distributed among all the leading clubs of the East, California polo received a great deal of recognition. Mr. Raybould was born in Salt Lake City, September 12, 1888. He received his early education in the Salt Lake schools. He completed his education at the University of Utah. After leaving college Mr. Raybould connected with the leading journals of Utah. Since coming to California in 1911 Mr. Raybould has been with the San Francisco Chronicle. Mr. Raybould belongs to the Owl and Key and the Skull and Bones of the University of Utah, the Beta Theta Pi fraternity, the Ophite club of San Francisco, the Peninsula Club of San Mateo and the San Mateo Chamber of...

Biography of Isaiah H. Jones

Isaiah H. Jones was born in Hardin county, Ohio, July 27, 1837. His parents were Jonathan and Eleanor (Pugh) Jones. His father was a prominent farmer and stock-raiser, and a native of Maryland. His mother was born in Virginia. Our subject was reared and educated in his native county, and began his business career as a clerk in a dry goods store at Mt. Victory, Ohio. After two years in that business he went to Rule, Nebraska, where he remained during eight months. From there he went to Grundy county, Missouri, where he engaged in school teaching for a time, and in the Spring of 1859 started with the tide of immigration to Colorado, returned to this county, and the following spring went to Colorado and engaged in mining for about two years. He returned again to Missouri in 1861 and entered the freighting business between St. Joseph, Omaha and Denver; continued that occupation for three years, and then went to Salt Lake City and from there to Montana, where he again engaged in mining from 1863 to 1868. Mr. Jones established his present ” Great Western Flouring Mill” at Jamesport in 1872, and has since enlarged and improved his mill and machinery several tines to keep pace with his constantly increasing business. He has one of the best equipped and conducted mills in North Missouri, and turns out only the best brands of manufactured goods. Mr. Jones was married at Jamesport, July 27, 1869, to Miss Amelia C. Jenkins, daughter of Electius C. Jenkins, of Ohio. They have two children, Adria A. and William Isadore. Mr. Jones is...

Utah World War 2 NMCG Casualty List

Inclusion of names in this Utah World War II Casualty List has been determined solely by the residence of next of kin at the time of notification of the last wartime casualty status. This listing does not necessarily represent the State of birth, legal residence, or official State credit according to service enlistment. Casualties listed represent only those on active duty in the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, resulting directly from enemy action or from operational activities against the enemy in war zones from December 7, 1941, to the end of the war. Casualties in the United States area or as a result of disease, homicide or suicide in any location is not included. This is a state summary taken from casualty lists released by the Navy Department, corrected as to the most recent casualty status and recorded residence of next of kin. Personnel listed as MISSING are under continuous investigation by the Navy Department, and therefore will be officially presumed or determined dead. Some will be found alive. The last official notice to next of kin will take precedence over this list. Compiled, February 1946 Utah Summary of War Casualties Dead: Combat 372 Prison Camp 3 Missing 1 Wounded 425 Released Prisoners 32 Total 833 Utah World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Utah WW2 NMCG Casualty List – A Surnames Utah WW2 NMCG Casualty List – B Surnames Utah WW2 NMCG Casualty List – C Surnames Utah WW2 NMCG Casualty List – D Surnames Utah WW2 NMCG Casualty List – E Surnames Utah WW2 NMCG Casualty List – F Surnames Utah WW2 NMCG Casualty List –...

Utah Vital Records

Vital records, as their name suggests, are connected with central life events: birth, marriage, and death. Maintained by civil authorities, they are prime sources of genealogical information; but, unfortunately, official vital records are available only for relatively recent periods. These records, despite their recent creation in the United States, are critically important in genealogical research, often supplying details on family members well back into the nineteenth century. The Source: A Guidebook of American Genealogy, by Loretto Szucs and Sandra Luebking. Utah Vital Records Birth Records Birth Records Available: The State Office began filing birth certificates in 1905 for persons born in Utah. Restrictions: Applicant must maintain that they are one of the following: Self Mother Father Sibling Child Grandparent Grandchild Other: Must provide reason for requesting the certificate. Cost: Search fee (includes one certified copy) – $15.00 Each additional copy of the same record – $8.00 Information Required: Please provide as much of the following information as possible for us to locate the birth certificate: View and print an application for a certified copy of a birth certificate If event occurred from 1890 to 1904 in Salt Lake City or Ogden, write to City Board of Health. For records elsewhere in the State from 1898 to 1904, write to County Clerk in county where event occurred. Send To: Personal check or money order should be made payable to Vital Records. Send the above application and the appropriate fee to: Office of Vital Records and Statistics 288 North 1460 West PO Box 141012 Salt Lake City, UT 84114-1012 In Utah? You may apply in person at: 288 North 1460 West...

Letters of President Pierce to Colonel Steptoe

President Pierce appointed Colonel Steptoe as governor to succeed Brigham Young and his appointment was duly confirmed by the Senate. Owing to the peculiar conditions existing in Utah, the governorship of that territory was considered one of the most important appointments in the hands of the President, yet the appointment of Colonel Steptoe received the highest commendation from the press and the people generally who were familiar with the requirements of the office. Letter from President Pierce to Steptoe – Page 1Letter from President Pierce to Steptoe – Page 2Letter from President Pierce to Steptoe – Page 3Letter from President Pierce to Steptoe – Page 4Letter from President Pierce to Steptoe – Page...

Treaty of June 1, 1868

Articles of a treaty and agreement made and entered into at Fort Sumner, New Mexico, on the first day of June, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight, by and between the United States, represented by its commissioners, Lieutenant-General W. T. Sherman and Colonel Samuel F. Tappan, of the one part, and the Navajo Nation or tribe of Indians, represented by their chiefs and head-men, duly authorized and empowered to act for the whole people of said nation or tribe, (the names of said chiefs and head-men being hereto subscribed,) of the other part, witness: ARTICLE 1. From this day forward all war between the parties to this agreement shall forever cease. The Government of the United States desires peace, and its honor is hereby pledged to keep it. The Indians desire peace, and they now pledge their honor to keep it. If bad men among the whites, or among other people subject to the authority of the United States, shall commit any wrong upon the person or property of the Indians, the United States will, upon proof made to the agent and forwarded to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs at Washington City, proceed at once to cause the offender to be arrested and punished according to the laws of the United States, and also to reimburse the injured persons for the loss sustained. If the bad men among the Indians shall commit a wrong or depredation upon the person or property of any one, white, black, or Indian, subject to the authority of the United States and at peace therewith, the Navajo tribe agree that they will, on proof...

Treaty of March 2, 1868

Articles of a treaty and agreement made and entered into at Washington City, D. C., on the second day of March, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight, by and between Nathaniel G. Taylor, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Alexander C. Hunt, governor of Colorado Territory and ex-officio superintendent of Indian affairs, and Kit Carson, duly authorized to represent the United States, of the one part, and the representatives of the Tabaquache, Muache, Capote, Weeminuche, Yampa, Grand River, and Uintah bands of Ute Indians, (whose names are hereto subscribed,) duly authorized and empowered to act for the body of the people of said bands, of the other part, witness: Article 1. All of the provisions of the treaty concluded with the Tabequache band of Utah Indians October seventh, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, as amended by the Senate of the United States and proclaimed December fourteenth, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-four, which are not inconsistent with the provisions of this treaty, as hereinafter provided, are hereby re-affirmed and declared to be applicable and to continue in force as well to the other bands, respectively, parties to this treaty, as to the Tabequache band of Utah Indians. Article 2. The United States agree that the following district of country, to wit: Commencing at that point on the southern boundary-line of the Territory of Colorado where the meridian of longitude 107° west from Greenwich crosses the same; running thence north with said meridian to a point fifteen miles due north of where said meridian intersects the fortieth parallel of north latitude; thence due west to the western boundary-line of said Territory;...

Treaty of October 12, 1863

Treaty of peace and friendship made at Tuilla Valley, in the Territory of Utah, this twelfth day of October, A. D. one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, between the United States of America, represented by the undersigned commissioners, and the Shoshonee-Goship bands of Indians, represented by their chiefs, principal men, and warriors, as follows: Article I.Peace and friendship is hereby established and shall be hereafter maintained between the Shoshonee-Goship bands of Indians and the citizens and Government of the United States; and the said bands stipulate and agree that hostilities and all depredations upon the emigrant trains, the mail and telegraph lines, and upon the citizens of the United States, within their country, shall cease. Article II.It is further stipulated by said bands that the several routes of travel through their country now or hereafter used by white men shall be forever free and unobstructed by them, for the use of the Government of the United States, and of all emigrants and travelers within it under its authority and protection, without molestation or injury from them. And if depredations are at any time committed by bad men of their own or other tribes within their country, the offenders shall be immediately taken and delivered up to the proper officers of the United States, to be punished as their offences may deserve; and the safety of all travelers passing peaceably over either of said routes is hereby guaranteed by said bands. Military posts may be established by the President of the United States along said routes, or elsewhere in their country; and station-houses may be erected and occupied at such...

Treaty of October 1, 1863

Treaty of Peace and Friendship made at Ruby Valley, in the Territory of Nevada, this first day of October, A. D. one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, between the United States of America, represented by the undersigned commissioners, and the Western Bands of the Shoshonee Nation of Indians, represented by their Chiefs and Principal Men and Warriors, as follows: Article I.Peace and friendship shall be hereafter established and maintained between the Western Bands of the Shoshonee nation and the people and Government of the United States; and the said bands stipulate and agree that hostilities and all depredations upon the emigrant trains, the mail and telegraph lines, and upon the citizens of the United States within their country, shall cease. Article II.The several routes of travel through the Shoshonee country, now or hereafter used by white men, shall be forever free, and unobstructed by the said bands, for the use of the government of the United States, and of all emigrants and travelers under its authority and protection, without molestation or injury from them. And if depredations are at any time committed by bad men of their nation, the offenders shall be immediately taken and delivered up to the proper officers of the United States, to be punished as their offences shall deserve; and the safety of all travelers passing peaceably over either of said routes is hereby guarantied by said bands. Military posts may be established by the President of the United States along said routes or elsewhere in their country; and station houses may be erected and occupied at such points as may be necessary for the...
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