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Treaty of July 23, 1851

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Traverse des Sioux, upon the Minnesota River, in the Territory of Minnesota, on the twenty-third day of July, eighteen hundred and fifty-one, between the United States of America, by Luke Lea, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, and Alexander Ramsey, governor and ex-officio superintendent of Indian affairs in said Territory, commissioners duly appointed for that purpose, and See-see-toan and Wah-pay-toan bands of Dakota or Sioux Indians. Article 1. It is stipulated and solemnly agreed that the peace and friendship now so happily existing between the United States and the aforesaid bands of Indians, shall be perpetual. Article 2. The said See-see-toan and Wah-pay-toan bands of Dakota or Sioux Indians, agree to cede, and do hereby cede, sell, and relinquish to the United States, all their lands in the State of Iowa; and, also all their lands in the Territory of Minnesota, lying east of the following line, to wit: Beginning at the junction of the Buffalo River with the Red River of the North; thence along the western bank of said Red River of the North, to the mouth of the Sioux Wood River; thence along the western bank of said Sioux Wood River to Lake Traverse; thence, along the western shore of said lake, to the southern extremity thereof; thence in a direct line, to the junction of Kampeska Lake with the Tchan-kas-an-data, or Sioux River; thence along the western bank of said river to its point of intersection with the northern line of the State of Iowa; including all the islands in said rivers and lake. Article 3. [Stricken out.] Article...

Treaty of March 12, 1858

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at the city of Washington, on the twelfth day of March, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight, by Charles E. Mix, commissioner on the part of the United States, and Wa-gah-sah-pi, or Whip; Gish-tah-wah-gu, or Strong Walker; Mitchell P. Cera, or Wash-kom-moni; A-shno-ni-kah-gah-hi, or Lone Chief; Shu-kah-bi, or Heavy Clouds; Tah-tungah-nushi, or Standing Buffalo, on the part of the Ponca tribe of Indians; they being thereto duly authorized and empowered by said tribe. Article 1. The Ponca tribe of Indians hereby cede and relinquish to the United States all the lands now owned or claimed by them, wherever situate, except the tract bounded as follows, viz: Beginning at a point on the Neobrara River and running due north, so as to intersect the Ponca River twenty-five miles from its mouth; thence from said point of intersection, up and along the Ponca River, twenty — miles; thence due south to the Neobrara River; and thence down and along said river to the place of beginning; which tract is hereby reserved for the future homes of said Indians; and to which they agree and bind themselves to remove within one year from the date of the ratification of this agreement by this Senate and President of the United States. Article 2. In consideration of the foregoing cession and relinquishment, the United States agree and stipulate as follows, viz: First. To protect the Poncas in the possession of the tract of land reserved for their future homes, and their persons and property thereon, during good behavior on their part. Second. To pay to them,...

Treaty of September 24, 1857

Articles of agreement and convention made this twenty-fourth day of September, A. D. 1857, at Table Creek, Nebraska Territory, between James W. Denver, commissioner on behalf of the United States, and the chiefs and head-men of the four confederate bands of Pawnee Indians, viz: Grand Pawnees, Pawnee Loups, Pawnee Republicans, and Pawnee Tappahs, and generally known as the Pawnee tribe. Article 1. The confederate bands of the Pawnees aforesaid, hereby cede and relinquish to the United States all their right, title, and interest in and to all the lands now owned or claimed by them, except as hereinafter reserved, and which are bounded as follows. viz: On the east by the lands lately purchased by the United States from the Omahas; on the south by the lands heretofore ceded by the Pawnees to the United States; on the west by a line running due north from the junction of the North with the South Fork of the Platte River, to the Keha-Paha River; and on the north by the Keha-Paha River, to its junction with the Niobrara, L’eauqi Court, or Running-Water River, and thence, by that river, to the western boundary of the late Omaha cession. Out of this cession the Pawnees reserve a tract of country, thirty miles long from east to west, by fifteen miles wide from north to south, including both banks of the Loup Fork of the Platte River; the east line of which shall be at a point not further east than the mouth of Beaver Creek. If, however, the Pawnees, in conjunction with the United States agent, shall be able to find a...

Treaty of August 5, 1851

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Mendota, in the Territory of Minnesota, on the fifth day of August, eighteen hundred and fifty-one, between the United States of America, by Luke Lea, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, and Alexander Ramsey, governor and ex-officio superintendent of Indian affairs in said Territory, commissioners duly appointed for that purpose, and the Med-ay-wa-kan-toan and Wah-pay-koo-tay bands of Dakota and Sioux Indians. Article 1. The peace and friendship existing between the United States and the Med-ay-wa-kan-toan and Wah-pay-koo-tay bands of Dakota or Sioux Indians shall be perpetual. Article 2. The said Med-ay-wa-kan-toan and Wah-pay-koo-tay bands of Indians do hereby cede and relinquish all their lands and all their right, title and claim to any lands whatever, in the Territory of Minnesota, or in the State of Iowa. Article 3. [Stricken out.] Article 4. In further and full consideration of said cession and relinquishment, the United States agree to pay to said Indians the sum of one million four hundred and ten thousand dollars, ($1,410,000,) at the several times, in the manner and for the purposes following, to wit: 1st. To the chiefs of the said bands, to enable them to settle their affairs and comply with their present just engagements; and in consideration of their removing themselves to the country set apart for them as above, (which they agree to do within one year after the ratification of this treaty, without further cost or expense to the United States,) and in consideration of their subsisting themselves the first year after their removal, (which they agree to do without further cost or expense on the...

Biography of George S. Murphey

For over forty years George S. Murphey had been a banker. Nearly thirty of those years have been spent in Kansas, and as president of the First National Bank of Manhattan he is at the head of one of the strong and stable financial institutions of the state. Most of his life had been spent in the West and he was in the Middle West at a time when it was really the Far West. His birth occurred in Delaware, Ohio, September 24, 1846. His father James Murphey was born in Penusylvania and his mother Rhoda Carpenter was born in New York, and after their marriago in New York State they moved to Delaware, Ohio. In 1856 the family moved out to Blackhawk County, Iowa, where the parents settled on a farm and there spent the rest of their houored and useful careers. Of their children five sons and one daughter reached maturity. The State of Iowa sixty years ago was a new and undeveloped portion of American territory. George S. Murphey from the age of ten until he was twenty-five lived on a farm in that state and necessarily his education was confined to such advantages as the common schools of the day afforded. When twenty he assumed the management of his father’s farm, and five years of that work and subsequently three years of experience in the agricultural implement business at Elk Point in South Dakota gave him a practical insight into agricultural conditions and an understanding of the life of a farmer which have been valuable assets in his later business career. When Mr. Murphey entered...

Biography of Josiah C. Trask

Josiah C. Trask was one of the 180 victims of the terrible Quantrill raid and massacre at Lawrence, on August 21, 1863. He was a young and brilliant editor at the time of his death and few men of Kansas were more beloved. His father was a minister, who preached in Massachnsetts for many years, and he himself was born at Warren, that state, May 9, 1837. He pursued an academic course at Fitchburg, and when sixteen years of age went to Boston, where he was employed as a printer in various newspaper offices. Through his father-in-law, Joel B. Hibbard, one of the founders of Cortland (New York) Academy, Mr. Trask imbibed strong anti-slavery convictions, and in February, 1857, in company with his brother, left New York for the Territory of Kansas. He first secured employment in the office of the Herald of Freedom, Lawrence, and in 1861, with Hovey E. Lowman, bought the paper and changed its name to the Kansas State Journal. Soon afterward he edited a paper at Topeka and published one at Yankton, Dakota. In the fall of 1862 he returned to New York, married and settled at Lawrence. In the following year, besides editing the Journal, he went as a delegate to the canal convention held in Chieago, and in the following July spent the Fourth, with his young bride, at Junction City. Arrangements had been completed for adding a daily issue to the Journal and the press arrived only a few days before his death. For several years he had done a large portion of the printing of the laws of Kansas, was...

South Dakota WW2 NMCG Casualty List – A Surnames

ADKINS, Lawrence Harvey, Fireman 2c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Caswell Adkins, Alexandria. ALLUM, Isaac Kenton, Pharmacist’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. And Mrs. Claude E. Allum, Herrick. ALTFILLISCH, Albert A., Cpl., USMCR. Parents, Mr. And Mrs. Albert B. Altfillisch, Pedro. ANDERSON, Arnold Leo, Seaman 1c, USN. Father, Mr. Alvin Anderson, Waverly. ANDERSON, Donald Eugene, Coxswain, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Anderson, Woonsocket. ANDERSON, Orville Walter, Electrician’s Mate 1c, USN. Parents, Mr. And Mrs. Carl Otto Anderson, 314 W. 12th St., Sioux Falls. ANDERSON, Vern M., Cpl., USMC. Father, Mr. Pearl Anderson, Powell. ANDERSON, Wayne Maurice, Aviation Radioman 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Anderson, Marvin. APLAND, Ross Helmer, Seaman 1c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ellsworth B. Apland, Rt. 1, Brookings. ARMS, Eldin Robert, Ensign, USNR. Father, Mr. Clinton Dewitt Arms, Kennebec. ARMSTRONG, Donald, Pfc., USMC. Father, Mr. Lester Armstrong, Box 262, Kennebec. ARMSTRONG, Robert Leroy, Pharmacist’s Mate 3c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Roy Armstrong,...

South Dakota WW2 NMCG Casualty List – B Surnames

BAKER, Daniel Albert, Seaman 2c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Margaret Jane Baker, Box 147, Webster. BALCOM, Lester Byron, Pharmacist’s Mate 2c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Claude Everett Balcom, Rapid City. BANNING, Richard Franklin, Coxswain, USN. Father, Mr. Charles William Banning, Rt. 2, Sioux Falls. BARGER, Donald Loren, Seaman 1c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Arthur Barger, Tabor. BARNARD, Charles Henry, Gunner’s Mate 1c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Berdett Barnard, Wagner. BARROWS, Dale Allen, Lieutenant (jg), USNR. Father, Mr. John Peter Barrows, Stickney. BAUER, Paul Francis, Ship’s Serviceman 3c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Helen E. Bauer, Kranzburg. BECK, George Wright, Seaman 1c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry K. Beck, Custer. BEHREND, Lewis John, Lieutenant (jg), USNR. Mother, Mrs. Julia Behrend, Parkston. BELL, John Roger, Watertender 2c, USN. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clement Henry Bell, 113 5th St., S. E. Watertown. BERG, Lyman Willis, 2d Lieutenant, USMCR. Wife, Mrs. Lyman W. Berg, 724 3d Ave., S. W. Aberdeen. BERGEN, James Francis, Coxswain, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Christina Bergen, Sherman. BERTRAM, Roesler Adolf, Ship’s Cook 3c, USN. Mother, Mrs. Amanda Bertram, 313 S. Wisconsin St., Mitchell. BLAU, William Franklin, Radio Technician 1c, USNR. Wife, Mrs. Harriet Sorensen Blau, 607 Picotte St., Yankton. BLOW, Lloyd, Pfc., USMC. Wife, Mrs. Lloyd Blow, Ipswich. BONDURANT, Norman Lee, Machinist’s Mate 3c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Wesley Bondurant, Buffalo Gap. BOWEN, Russell Earl, Lieutenant, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Earl thomas Bowen, 239 N. French Ave., Sioux Falls. BRADBURY, Thomas Morgan, Hopital Apprentice 1c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Bert R. Bradbury, Howard. BRADY, Thomas Benedict, Ensign, USNR. Father, Mr. Frank M. Brady,...
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