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MacDonald McDonald Family Records

THE M(a)cDonald Family is among the forty-nine “best families” selected by the American Historical-Genealogical Society for whom the Society has published family histories during the past few years. The M(a)cDonald family has been prominent in the British Empire and in the United States; its members having played important roles in war and in peace. Family pride is a commendable trait and should be cultivated. All M(a)cDonald have just cause to be proud of their family history and traditions. In reference No. 14 we find the following regarding the origin and meaning of the name MacDonald: The surname, MacDonald, means the son or descendant of Donald. Donald is a well-known northern personal name. By some etymologists it is thought to be derived from the Gaelic “donhuil,” which means “browneyed.” Others say that it comes from two Gaelic words, “domhan”-the world-and “all”-mighty. In Scotch histories of the family the name is always written Macdonald or MacDonald, while those of the clan who have come to America usually use the abbreviation, McDonald. The clan MacDonald is certainly one of the oldest and most important in Scotland. Its chiefs descended from Somerled, Thane of Argyle, but sometimes styled King of the Isles, who flourished in the twelfth century. This clan has been known for centuries for its fearlessness and bravery, and also for its ancient and unbroken lineage. It is well represented today throughout Great Britain and the United States. The data in this volume is gathered from reliable sources. We have selected what we consider the most important material. Many of the daughters, and sons for whom no issue was shown, have...

South Dakota County Courthouse Addresses

South Dakota State Vital Records Office Vital Records, Dept of Health 600 East Capitol Pierre, SD 57501-2536 (605) 773-4961 Email: kathimu@doh.state.sd.us Aurora County Courthouse Plankinton, SD 57368 (605) 942-7161 Hyde County P.O. Box 306 Highmore, SD 57345-0306 (605) 852-2512 Beadle County Courthouse Huron, SD 57350 (605) 353-7165 Jackson County Courthouse Kadoka, SD 57543 (605) 837-2420 Bennett County Main Street Martin, SD 57551 (605) 685-6969 Jerauld County Courthouse Wessington Springs, SD 57382 (605) 539-1221 Bon Homme County Courthouse Tyndall, SD 57066 (605) 589-3382 Jones County Courthouse Murdo, SD 57559 (605) 669-2361 Brookings County 314 Sixth Avenue Brookings, SD 57006-2041 (605) 692-6284 Kingsbury County Courthouse De Smet, SD 57231 (605) 854-3832 Brown County 111 SE First Avenue Aberdeen, SD 57401-4203 (605) 622-2266 Lake County P.O. Box 447 Madison, SD 57042-0447 (605) 256-4876 Brule County 300 South Courtland Chamberlain, SD 57325-1508 (605) 734-5443 Lawrence County 644 Main Street Deadwood, SD 57732-1124 (605) 578-2040 Buffalo County Courthouse Gann Valley, SD 57341-0148 (605) 293-3234 Lincoln County 100 East Fifth Street Canton, SD 57013-1732 (605) 987-5661 Butte County Courthouse Belle Fourche, SD 57717 (605) 892-2516 Lyman County Courthouse Kennebec, SD 57544 (605) 869-2277 Campbell County Mound City, SD 57646 (605) 955-3536 Marshall County Courthouse Britton, SD 57430 (605) 448-5213 Charles Mix County Courthouse Lake Andes, SD 57356 (605) 487-7511 McCook County Courthouse Salem, SD 57058 (605) 425-2781 Clark County Courthouse Clark, SD 57225 (605) 532-5363 McPherson County P.O. Box L Leola, SD 57456 (605) 439-3351 Clay County P.O. Box 403 Vermillion, SD 57069-0403 (605) 624-2871 Meade County 1425 Sherman Street Sturgis, SD 57785-1452 (605) 347-2356 Codington County Courthouse Watertown, SD 57201 (605) 886-4850 Mellette County...

South Dakota Vital Records

Vital records, as their name suggests, are connected with central life events: birth, marriage, and death. Maintained by civil authorities, they are prime sources of genealogical information; but, unfortunately, official vital records are available only for relatively recent periods. These records, despite their recent creation in the United States, are critically important in genealogical research, often supplying details on family members well back into the nineteenth century. The Source: A Guidebook of American Genealogy, by Loretto Szucs and Sandra Luebking. South Dakota Birth Records DatabaseThis site contains information from birth records with birth dates of over 100 years of age as required by South Dakota Codified Law 34-25-8. At this time this site contains 99,461 records Ancestry.com  South Dakota State Database A large collection of databases of births, deaths, marriages, census, obituaries, directories, estate records, and service records. South Dakota State Vital Records Office Vital Records, Dept of Health 600 East Capitol Pierre, SD 57501-2536 (605) 773-4961 Make check or money order payable to South Dakota Department of Health. Birth  Death $10.00  Since July 1905 The State Office has access to other records for some events that occurred before 1905. If the records are not available at the State office, they should be available from the Register of Deeds in the county where the event occurred. Fees vary. Marriage  Divorce  $7.00 You may complete a record request and submit it with your fee. (Use ADOBE) Since 1943 Available from the Register of Deeds in the county where the event occurred. Fees...

Treaty of February 19, 1867

Whereas it is understood that a portion of the Sissiton and Warpeton bands of Santee Sioux Indians, numbering from twelve hundred to fifteen hundred persons, not only preserved their obligations to the Government of the United States, during and since the outbreak of the Medewakantons and other bands of Sioux in 1862, but freely periled their lives during that outbreak to rescue the residents on the Sioux reservation, and to obtain possession of white women and children made captives by the hostile bands; and that another portion of said Sissiton and Warpeton bands, numbering from one thousand to twelve hundred persons, who did not participate in the massacre of the whites in 1862, fearing the indiscriminate vengeance of the whites, fled to the great prairies of the Northwest, where they still remain; and Whereas Congress, in confiscating the Sioux annuities and reservations, made no provision for the support of these, the friendly portion of the Sissiton and Warpeton bands, and it is believed [that] they have been suffered to remain homeless wanderers, frequently subject to intense sufferings from want of subsistence and clothing to protect them from the rigors of a high northern latitude, although at all times prompt in rendering service when called upon to repel hostile raids and to punish depredations committed by hostile Indians upon the persons and property of the whites; and Whereas the several subdivisions of the friendly Sisseton’s and Warpeton bands ask, through their representatives, that their adherence to their former obligations of friendship to the Government and people of the United States be recognized, and that provision be made to enable them...

Treaty of March 8, 1865

Articles of treaty made and concluded at Washington, D. C., between the United States of America, by their commissioners, Wm. P. Dole, C. W. Thompson, and St. A. D. Balcombe, and the Winnebago tribe of Indians, by their chiefs, Little Hill, Little Decoria, Whirling Thunder, Young Prophet, Good Thunder, and White Breast, on the 8th day of March, 1865. Article I.The Winnebago tribe of Indians hereby cede, sell, and convey to the United States all their right, title, and interest in and to their present reservation in the Territory of Dakota, at Usher’s Landing, on the Missouri River, the metes and bounds whereof being on file in the Indian Department. Article II.In consideration of the foregoing cession, and the valuable improvements thereon, the United States agree to set apart for the occupation and future home of the Winnebago Indians, forever, all that certain tract or parcel of land ceded to the United States by the Omaha tribe of Indians on the sixth day of March, A. D. 1865, situated in the Territory of Nebraska, and described as follows, viz: Commencing at a point on the Missouri River four miles due south from the north boundary-line of said reservation; thence west ten miles; thence south four miles; thence west to the western boundary-line of the reservation; thence north to the northern boundary-line; thence east to the Missouri River, and thence south along the river to the place of beginning. Article III.In further consideration of the foregoing cession, and in order that the Winnebagos may be as well situated as they were when they were moved from Minnesota, the United States...

Treaty of March 10, 1865

Supplementary treaty between the United States of America and the Ponca tribe of Indians, made at the city of Washington on the tenth day of March, A. D. 1865, between William P. Dole, commissioner on the part of the United States, and Wah-gah-sap-pi, or Iron Whip; Gist-tah-wah-gu, or Strong Walker; Wash-com-mo-ni, or Mitchell P. Cerre; Ash-nan-e-kah-gah-he, or Lone Chief; Tah-ton-ga-nuz-zhe, or Standing Buffalo; on the part of the Ponca tribe of Indians, they being duly authorized and empowered by the said tribe, as follows, viz: Article 1.The Ponca tribe of Indians hereby cede and relinquish to the United States all that portion of their present reservation as described in the first article of the treaty of March 12th, 1858, lying west of the range line between townships numbers (32) thirty-two and (33) thirty-three north, ranges (10) ten and (11) eleven west of the (6) sixth principal meridian, according to the Kansas and Nebraska survey; estimated to contain thirty thousand acres, be the same more or less. Article 2.In consideration of the cession or release of that portion of the reservation above described by the Ponca tribe of Indians to the Government of the United States, the Government of the United States, by way of rewarding them for their constant fidelity to the Government and citizens thereof, and with a view of returning to the said tribe of Ponca Indians their old burying-grounds and corn-fields, hereby cede and relinquish to the tribe of Ponca Indians the following-described fractional townships, to wit: township (31) thirty-one north, range (7) seven west; also, fractional township (32) thirty-two north, ranges (6,) six, (7,) seven,...

Treaty of June 19, 1858 – Mdwekakanton

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at the city of Washington, on the nineteenth day of June, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight, by Charles E. Mix, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the following-named chiefs and headmen of the Mendawakanton and Wahpakoota bands of the Dakota or Sioux tribe of Indians, viz, Wabashaw, Chetanakooamonee, Washuhiyahidan, Shakopee, Wamindeetonkee, Muzzaojanjan, and Makawto, chiefs, and Hinhanduta, Ha-raka-Muzza, Wakanojanjan, Tachunr-pee-muz-za, Wakinyantowa, Chunrpiyuha, Onkeeterhidan, and Wamouisa, braves, on the part of the Mendawakantons, and Hushawshaw, chief, and Pa-Pa and Tataebomdu, braves, on the part of the Wahpakootas, they being duly authorized and empowered to act for said bands. Article 1. It is hereby agreed and stipulated that, as soon as practicable after the ratification of this agreement, so much of that part of the reservation or tract of land now held and possessed by the Mendawakanton and Wahpakoota bands of the Dakota or Sioux Indians, and which is described in the third article of the treaty made with them on the fifth day of August, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-one, which lies south or southwestwardly of the Minnesota River, shall constitute a reservation for said bands, and shall be surveyed, and eighty acres thereof, as near as may be in conformity with the public surveys, be allotted in severalty to each head of a family, or single person over the age of twenty-one years, in said band of Indians, said allotments to be so made as to include a proper proportion of timbered land, if the same be practicable, in each of said allotments. The residue of...

Treaty of June 19, 1858 – Sisseton

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at the city of Washington on the nineteenth day of June, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight, by Charles E. Mix, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the following-named chiefs and head-men of the Sisseeton and Wahpaton bands of the Dakota or Sioux tribe of Indians, viz: Maz-zah-shaw, Wamdupidutah, Ojupi, and Hahutanai, on the part of the Sisseetons, and Maz-zomanee, Muz-zakoote-manee, Upiyahideyaw, Umpedutokechaw, and Tachandupahotanka, on the part of the Wahpatons, they being duly authorized and empowered to act for said bands. Article 1. It is hereby agreed and stipulated that as soon as practicable after the ratification of this agreement, so much of that part of the reservation or tract of land now held and possessed by the Sisseeton and Wahpaton bands of the Dakota or Sioux Indians, and which is described in the third article of the treaty made with them on the twenty-third day of July, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-one, which lies south or south west wardly of the Minnesota River, shall constitute a reservation for said bands, and shall be surveyed, and eighty acres thereof, as near as may be in conformity with the public surveys, be allotted in severalty to each head of a family or single person over the age of twenty-one years, in said bands of Indians; said allotments to be so made as to include a proper proportion of timbered land, if the same be practicable, in each of said allotments. The residue of said part of said reservation not so allotted shall be held by said bands...

Treaty of April 19, 1858

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at the city of Washington, this nineteenth day of April, A. D. one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight, by Charles E. Mix, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the following-named chiefs and delegates of the Yancton tribe of Sioux or Dacotah Indians, viz: Pa-la-ne-a-pa-pe, the man that was struck by the Ree. Ma-to-sa-be-che-a, the smutty bear. Charles F. Picotte, Eta-ke-cha. Ta-ton-ka-wete-co, the crazy bull. Pse-cha-wa-kea, the jumping thunder. Ma-ra-ha-ton, the iron horn. Mombe-kah-pah, one that knocks down two. Ta-ton-ka-e-yah-ka, the fast bull. A-ha-ka-ma-ne, the walking elk. A-ha-ka-na-zhe, the standing elk. A-ha-ka-ho-che-cha, the elk with a bad voice. Cha-ton-wo-ka-pa, the grabbing hawk. E-ha-we-cha-sha, the owl man. Pla-son-wa-kan-na-ge, the white medicine cow that stands. Ma-ga-scha-che-ka, the little white swan. Oke-che-la-wash-ta, the pretty boy. (The three last names signed by their duly-authorized agent and representative, Charles F. Picotte,) they being thereto duly authorized and empowered by said tribe of Indians. Article 1. The said chiefs and delegates of said tribe of Indians do hereby cede and relinquish to the United States all the lands now owned, possessed, or claimed by them, wherever situated, except four hundred thousand acres thereof, situated and described as follows, to wit—Beginning at the mouth of the Naw-izi-wa-koo-pah or Chouteau River and extending up the Missouri River thirty miles: thence due north to a point; thence easterly to a point on the said Chouteau River; thence down said river to the place of beginning, so as to include the said quantity of four hundred thousand acres. They, also, hereby relinquish and abandon all claims and complaints about...
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