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Clifford Family of New Bedford, MA

Among the most prominent law offices in southern Massachusetts is one which by lineal succession has existed for nearly, if not quite, a hundred years, and in which three generations of the Clifford family have been represented. The members of the Clifford family who have been such important factors in this old and prominent law firm came of a distinguished ancestry. The late John H. Clifford was a direct descendant in the eighth generation from George Clifford, who came with his wife Elizabeth and son John from Arnold village and parish, Nottinghamshire, England, to Boston in 1644.

Pierce Family of North Bridgewater, MA

The Pierce families of this country are and have long been very numerous. Early in the settlement of New England came representatives from England, most of them not related, so far as now known. Among them were Abraham, of Plymouth, 1623, who became one of the original purchasers of Bridgewater in 1645; Daniel, of Newbury, blacksmith, who came from Ipswich, County of Suffolk, in 1634, aged twenty-three years; John, of Dorchester, mariner from Stepney, Middlesex, before 1631; another John, of Dorchester and Boston; John, of Watertown, 1638; Capt. Michael, of Hingham and Scituate; Richard, of Portsmouth, R. I.; Robert, of Dorchester; Thomas, of Charlestown, who was admitted to the church there in 1634; and Capt. William, of Boston, who was a distinguished shipmaster of his time.

Dwelly Family of Fall River, MA

DWELLY (Fall River family). The name Dwelly is an uncommon one and the family not numerous in New England annals. The Fall River Dwelly family is a branch of the Rhode Island family and it of the Scituate (Mass.) family, the immediate Fall River family here considered being that of Dr. Jerome Dwelly, who for some threescore or more years has administered to the ailments of humanity in and about Fall River, where he has most surely been to this people the “beloved physician” and one of the city’s substantial men. In the succeeding generation, one of his sons – the late Frank H. Dwelly – was the treasurer of both the Tecumseh Mills and the Ancona Company, extensive manufacturing concerns of Fall River. Here follows in detail and chronologically arranged from the first known American ancestor of the family the history of this Fall River branch of the Dwelly family. Richard Dwelly, of Scituate in 1665, or earlier, probably the same who was in Lancaster in 1654, and in Hingham in 1663, sold his estate in Hingham and removed to Scituate. His farm in the latter place was on the road leading from the third Herring brook to the harbor. For service in King Philip’s war he received a grant of land between Cornet’s mill and the Plymouth road. He had meadow land at Till’s creek, which stream later took his name. He died in 1692. Besides Mary, baptized in 1664, at Hingham, he had children, Richard, Samuel and John. Of these, Samuel died in Phipps’s expedition to Canada in 1690. John married in 1693 Rachel Buck, and...

Chase Family of Fall River MA

CHASE (Fall River family). The Chase family here considered is strictly speaking a Massachusetts-Rhode Island one, springing as it does from the early Roxbury Yarmouth family, a later generation of which located in Portsmouth, R. I. In the third generation from the immigrant ancestor through Joseph Chase, who located in Swansea, Mass., and Benjamin, who settled in Portsmouth, R. I., have descended the Chases who have come from those respective localities. And both branches have shared largely in the commercial and industrial life of this section of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. From the Portsmouth branch came the late Borden Chase, who for years was a coal dealer in Fall River, and his son, the present Simeon Borden Chase, has long been one of the fore-most cotton manufacturers of that same city and as well a most active and influential citizen. There follows in chronological order from the immigrant settler, William Chase, the genealogy and family history of the Portsmouth-Fall River family just alluded to. William Chase, born about 1595, in England, with wife Mary and son William came to America in the ship with Governor Winthrop and his colony in 1630, settling first in Roxbury. He soon became a member of the church of which the Rev. John Eliot, the Apostle to the Indians, was pastor. On Oct. 19, 1630, he applied for freemanship and was admitted a freeman May 14, 1634. In 1637, or thereabout, he became one of the company who made a new settlement at Yarmouth, of which town lie was made constable in 1639. He resided at Yarmouth the rest of his life, dying in...

Indian Wars of New England

To the student of Indian history of the early New England period the catalog of the librarian would allow one to infer that the ground had been already preempted by Mr. William Hubbard and some other well-known writers upon the tragedies of the early New England days, whose labors are more famous for being a quaint reflection of the times than for comprehensive treatment of the subject at hand. Without Mr. Drake’s labors, allied to those of Church and Belknap, the earlier story would be a meager one. It is to these authors one goes with assurance and infinite satisfaction, and one feels safe in accepting them as authorities upon the matters of which they write. Mr. Hubbard, who is most tedious in his narrative, leaves one at the threshold of Mr. Penhallow’s “Relation, “which brings one to the verge of 1726; while Mr. Palfrey’s consideration of the events which limit the scope of the present work is general rather than subjective. Unquestionably, Mr. Palfrey offers very little of the conflicts of the English settler with the Indians. His objective was a “History of New England,” to which the depredations of the Indians were necessarily incidental. With Gardener’s “Pequod Wars” and Church’s “Philip’s War” is ushered in a decade of peaceful years, the termination of which leaves one upon the threshold of a most sanguinary conflict which broke out anew in 1688, and in which the stage of activities was shifted from the purlieus of Mount Hope1 to the northern boundaries of New Hampshire and eastward about the marshes of old Scarborough and the islands of Merrymeeting Bay. Isolate...

Anthony Family of Bristol County Massachusetts

The Anthony family of Bristol County Massachusetts descend from one John Anthony of Hampstead England who travelled in the Hercules to New England and settled in Rhode Island in 1634. This family, under the entrepreneurship of Edmund Anthony, became prominent publishers of many early Massachusetts papers, some of which were prominent in the establishment of the Republican Party and it’s causes.

Osborn Family of Fall River Massachusetts

During the latter half of the century but recently closed and on into the present one, during the period of the great growth and development as an industrial center of Fall River, the name Osborn has stood out conspicuously in the business life of the city. Reference is made notably to the Osborn brothers — the late Hon. Weaver and James Munroe Osborn — for many years among the most prominent mill promoters and bankers of Fall River; and they have been followed by a generation now representative of the name and family, Mr. James E. Osborn, the son of James M., being now active and prominent in the same line of operation the father followed, is treasurer of the American Linen Company and Merchants’ Manufacturing Company and president of the Covel & Osborn Company, dealers in hardware and mill supplies. This Osborn family here treated is one of at least a century and three quarters’ standing in Rhode Island and the nearby part of Massachusetts. Still earlier than the beginning of the period just named there is a record of the family of Jeremiah and Mercy Osband at Bristol, now R. I., as early as 1684, the date of birth of their first child. Their children were: Robert Osband, born Aug. 11, 1684; Katherine Osband, born Nov. 12, 1686; John Osband, born Oct. 12, 1689; Jeremiah Osband, born July 25, 1693; Margaret Osband, born May 27, 1695; Sarah Osband, born May 11, 1701; Jeremiah Osband (2), born June 11, 1706. One Nathaniel Osband petitioned the General Court at its May session, held at Newport, 1682. So far as has...

Descendants of Captain Michael Pierce

The Pierce family is one of the ancient Colonial families of the Commonwealth, the forerunners of the name playing a conspicuous part as masters of vessels bringing hither emigrants from England. For several generations there has lived in New Bedford a branch of the old Rehoboth and Swansea Pierce family, descendants of Capt. Michael Pierce, who have been leading-spirits in the community — names especially conspicuous in the industrial life of the town and vicinity. Reference is made particularly to some of the descendants of the late Otis Norton Pierce, whose son, the late Hon. Andrew Granville Pierce, was for forty-two years treasurer of the Wamsutta Mills Company, an extensive and the most successful cotton industry of New Bedford, serving, too, for a time as its president, and who was officially connected with many other enterprises of New Bedford and elsewhere; and who, too, was hardly less prominent in the public affairs of the place, serving as the chief executive officer of the city and as a member of the city government; to another son, Otis Norton Pierce, Jr., who was long chief clerk of the Wamsutta Mills Company and of the New Bedford and Taunton Railroad Company, and has been officially identified with a number of corporations of New Bedford, being at present president of the Grinnell Manufacturing Company; to the sons of the first mentioned of these brothers, Andrew G., who are now actively carrying forward to even greater success the work of their father; to Charles M. Peirce, deceased, who was long in business in New Bedford, active and influential in municipal and legislative work; and...

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