Pennsylvania


Sir William Johnson and the Six Nations

Sir William Johnson and the Six Nations

The Mohawk Valley in which Sir William Johnson spent his adult life (1738-17 74) was the fairest portion of the domain of the Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy. In this valley William Griffis had lived nine years, seeing on every side traces or monuments of the industry, humanity, and powerful personality of its most famous resident in colonial days. From the quaint stone church in Schenectady which Sir Johnson built, and in whose canopied pews he sat, daily before his eyes, to the autograph papers in possession of his neighbors; from sites close at hand and traditionally associated with the lord of Johnson Hall, to the historical relics which multiply at Johnstown, Canajoharie, and westward, — mementos of the baronet were never lacking. His two baronial halls still stand near the Mohawk. Local traditions, while in the main generous to Johnson’s memory, was sometimes unfair and even cruel. The hatreds engendered by the partisan features of the Revolution, and the just detestation of the savage atrocities of Tories and red allies led by Johnson’s son and son-in-law, had done injustice to the great man himself. Yet base and baseless tradition was in no whit more unjust than the sectional opinions and hostile gossip of the New England militia which historians have so freely transferred to their pages.



Hampton History: an account of the Pennsylvania Hamptons in America

Title page to Hampton History

Hampton History: an account of the Pennsylvania Hamptons in America in the line of John Hampton, Jr., of Wrightstown; with an appendix treating of some other branches.



Hackleman Family Record

Hackleman Family Records

This is a transcript of the first 31 pages of Elijah Hackleman’s Scrap book No. 2. The original is in the Wabash County Indiana Historical Museum. Although material of genealogical significance is to be found throughout the scrapbook, the material following deals with the Hackleman family. Michael Hackleman was born in Germany about the year 1720. He migrated to America in the seventeenth year of his age (1737) and was bound to a Maryland, or Pennsylvania farmer for three years to pay for his passage. He finally cleared twenty-six acres of land, and squared the account. He married Mary Sailors in March of 1751, and settled on the Susquehanna River, near the line of Pennsylvania and Maryland. He later in life moved to the Abbeville District, South Carolina where he died in 1808. His children were named Jacob, Lydia, Conrad, John and George.



Kephart – Walker Family Bible

Antique Bible

This is a family Bible owned by H. H. and Mary Kephart of Osceola, Tioga County, Pennsylvania. At some point in it’s providence passed into Annie R. Kephart’s hand and her marriage to Abram L. Walker. At some point it appears the Bible then passed into the hands of Nancy Alda Walker where children from



Upper Otorara Presbyterian Church Records, Chester County PA

Upper Octorara Church, Erected in 1840

List of Surnames of the Earliest Members of Upper Octorara Persons bearing these names, were members prior to the middle of the 18th century. Alison, Blelock, Boggs, Boyd, Boyle, Clingan, Cochran, Cowan, Dickey, Filson, Fleming, Gardner, Glendenning, Hamill, Henderson, Heslep, Hope, Kerr, Kyle, Liggett, Lockhart, Luckey, McAllister, McNeil, McPherson, Mitchell, Moody, Park, Richmond, Robb, Rowan,



New Side Cemetery, Chester County, Pennsylvania

New Side Cemetery, Chester County, Pennsylvania. List of persons buried in the old “new side” graveyard on the farm late of Cyrus Cooper, deceased, so far as the same are marked by gravestones.  



Upper Octorara Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Chester County, Pennsylvania

Upper Octorara Graveyard and Old Session House

List of persons buried in the Upper Octorara Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Chester County, Pennsylvania. Information includes date of death and known age at death if provided on headstone.



Lutheran Orphans’ Home and Asylum, Germantown PA 1892-1914

Lutheran Orphans Home and Asylum Germantown

Philadelphia has been justly noted for its many charitable and benevolent institutions. Among these the “Orphans’ Home and Asylum for the Aged and Infirm of the Evangelical Lutheran Church at Germantown” holds a conspicuous place. When so many children were made orphans during the late war, this institution was among the first to open its doors for these soldiers’ orphans, and 98 were admitted up to the time when the State provided homes for them. Including with these reports are names and ages of the orphans who were present during the year.



Captivity and Escape of Mary Inglis (Ingles) – Indian Captivities

Mary Draper Ingles Chimney Plaque

The captivity of Mary Draper Inglis (Ingles) is a third person account of her captivity and eventual escape. Mary was captured by Shawnee Indians along with her two sons, and sister-in-law from Draper’s Meadow in 1755. She eventually made her escape, along with another dutch woman, a few months later. This is her story.



Death of Cyrus Kingsbury

Rev. Cyrus Kingsbury

Early in the year 1820, an English traveler from Liverpool, named Adam Hodgson, who had heard of the Elliot mission when at home, visited the mission, though he had to turn from his main route of travel the distance of sixty miles. He, at one time on his sixty miles route, employed a Choctaw to



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