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Philadelphia To Steubenville

Monday, Oct. 4, 1819.–Dr. Hall and myself left Philadelphia at 1 o’clock p. m. after taking an affectionate leave of friends and acquaintances. Fair and pleasant weather, and the roads very fine in consequence of a refreshing shower of rain which fell on the night previous to our setting out. After traveling twenty-two miles and passing some rich and well-cultivated farms we arrived at West Chester at 7 o’clock. West Chester contains about 600 inhabitants, several places of worship, a gaol, etc., etc. A man named Downey is confined in the gaol of this place for debt. He was once in affluence, but from misfortunes and some imprudence he became reduced in circumstances. During his confinement he determined to starve himself to death, and for seven days had refused nourishment of every description. Even the clergy waited on him and endeavored to dissuade him from his rash determination, offering him food of different kinds, but all without avail. He was able to stand. No doubt one or two more days will end his troubles. How long, O my country, will your cheeks continue to be crimsoned by the blush that must follow the plunging an innocent and unfortunate being, a debtor, in a dungeon, amongst murderers and cut-throats? Tuesday, Oct. 5.–Left West Chester at 7 o’clock a. m. Traveled a rough road. Passed some travelers on foot migrating to the west who were able to keep pace with us for a considerable distance. Breakfasted with an old Dutchman who, for unpolished manners and even a want of common politeness, surpassed in expectation even the wild men of Illinois. He...

Through Ohio And Kentucky

Sunday, Oct. 18.–Myself and friend proceeded on our journey. We arrived at Siers, a distance of thirty miles, at dusk, much relieved by the change from our horses to the wagon. The roads were muddy, the weather drizzly and the country hilly. Buildings indifferent. The land very fertile and black. Trees uncommonly tall. Passed the little village of Cadis. In this country a tavern, a store, a smith shop and two or three cabins make a town. Passed ten or fifteen travelers. Great contrast between the quality of the land from Chambersburg to Pittsburg, and that which we have already traveled over from Steubenville in Ohio. Monday, Oct. 19.–Left Siers at 6 o’clock a. m. The morning fair and cold. Roads extremely rough. Country fertile, but hilly. Log cabins, ugly women and tall timber. Passed a little flourishing village called Freeport, settled by foreigners. Yankee Quakers and mechanics. Remarkable, with two taverns in the village, there was nothing fit to drink, not even good water. The corn fields in the woods among dead trees and the corn very fine. We arrived at Adairs, a distance of twenty-seven miles, at 6 o’clock p. m. Passed some peddlers and a few travelers. Value of land from Steubenville to Adairs from $2 to $30 per acre. Lots in Freeport, eighteen months old, from $30 to $100. This day being Monday and the end of the second week since leaving home, our feelings were warm and our hearts beat high for those that are dear and behind us. Tuesday, Oct. 20.–Left Adairs at 6 o’clock a. m. The country extremely hilly and not...

Ohio World War 2 NMCG Casualty List

Inclusion of names in this Ohio World War II Casualty List has been determined solely by the residence of next of kin at the time of notification of the last wartime casualty status. This listing does not necessarily represent the State of birth, legal residence, or official State credit according to service enlistment. Casualties listed represent only those on active duty in the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, resulting directly from enemy action or from operational activities against the enemy in war zones from December 7, 1941, to the end of the war. Casualties in the United States area or as a result of disease, homicide or suicide in any location is not included. This is a state summary taken from casualty lists released by the Navy Department, corrected as to the most recent casualty status and recorded residence of next of kin. Personnel listed as MISSING are under continuous investigation by the Navy Department, and therefore will be officially presumed or determined dead. Some will be found alive. The last official notice to next of kin will take precedence over this list. Compiled, February 1946 Ohio Summary of War Casualties Dead: Combat 3111 Prison Camp 37 Missing 15 Wounded 4443 Released Prisoners 116 Total 7722 Ohio World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Ohio WW2 NMCG Casualty List – A Surnames Ohio WW2 NMCG Casualty List – B Surnames Ohio WW2 NMCG Casualty List – C Surnames Ohio WW2 NMCG Casualty List – D Surnames Ohio WW2 NMCG Casualty List – E Surnames Ohio WW2 NMCG Casualty List – F Surnames Ohio WW2 NMCG Casualty List –...

The ABC Family Chronicles

A number of years ago this author was researching information for a local history book. During that time she encountered numerous names that were members of her family heritage. That heritage went back in time in that same local area over a hundred years ago. Four of her family lines which came to Shelby County, Illinois are discussed in this volume. The Stoneburner line begins with the author’s mother and she is in the eighth generation from 1752. The Spracklin line begins with the author’s grandmother (mother’s mother) and she is in the sixth generation from 1823. The Austin line begins with the author s great-grandmother (mother’s grandmother) and she is in the 8th generation from 1687. The Broyles line contains three sets of maternal grandparents three generations back. However, this work traces the ancestry forward rather than backward. It is impossible in a work of this type to include all the descendants over a span of 300 years. Documentation is included as much as possible as well as an index to make it easier for the researcher. Invariably there will be mistakes. May a relative be not too upset if a mistake is made. Stoneburner – Germany, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Ohio, Illinois Spracklin – England, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois Austin – England, Maryland, Virginia, Missouri, Illinois Broyles – Germany, Virginia, Illinois John Marion, third child of Robert and Margaret, had married Margaret Hannah Mohler in Muskingum County, Ohio. All their children-Leona, William E., Linzie O., Lyman, John W., and Hattie E. were born in Ohio. In 1884 most of this family likewise moved to Shelby County, Illinois. John and Maggie...

Genealogy of Linzie Otis Stoneburner

Linzie O., son of John M. and Margaret Stoneburner, continued living on a farm near Herrick. On the 25 April 1901 he married Ella Alice Miller, daughter of Benedict and Lucie Spockwell Miller. Linzie and Ella had a family of four children. In January of 1931, “about 40 neighbors and friends gathered at the home of L. O. Stoneburner and family to spend the evening. Following are the names of those present: Charles McKittrick and wife; Hubert Smart and family; Ellis Corley and wife; Arthur Salmons and family; Mrs. Lamora Manuel and children; Lawrence Stoneburner and family; Dorothy Campbell; John Stoneburner and family and Charles Wakefield. The evening was spent in playing music and games. Refreshments of pop corn and home made candy were served. A very pleasant evening was enjoyed by all. On June 28, 1934 Ella had surgery at the Pana hospital. She died a few days later. Her obituary read: “Ella Alice Stoneburner, daughter of Benedict and Lucy Miller, was born in Marion Co., Indiana, August 10, 1883 and departed this life July 4th 1934, at the age of 50 years, 10 months and 24 days. She was united in marriage to Linzie Stoneburner, April 25th 1901. Besides her companion and children she leaves to mourn her departure two sisters: Mrs. Joe Terrell of Rossville and Mrs. Robert Middleton of Tenexa, Kansas; three brothers: Clarence E., Charles W., and Nathan E. all of Indianapolis, Indiana. Three grandchildren: Lena and Robert Stoneburner and Arthur Frost.’ Linzie Otis lived for ten more years before his death in 1944. He “died at 10:30 pm Wednesday, March 8, in his...

Genealogy of Robert Stoneburner

Robert, fourth son of John and Catherine Stoneburner, lived in Morgan County, Ohio. There in Morgan County sometime around 1842, he married Margaret Landerman probable daughter of William Lenderman. In 1870 they were residents of Harrison Township in that County. Jerusalem Lutheran York Township Cemetery Inscriptions, Morgan County Ohio Robert Stoneburner b. 1810 d. 4 Aug 1898 at 78 years 10 months and 4 days Margaret Stoneburner b. 1816 d. 14 Aug 1906 at 93 years. 404 Robert Stoneburner born 3 Sept. 1819 Morgan County, Ohio married circa 1842 Margaret Landerman born circa 1815 Ohio died 4 Aug. 1898 Morgan County, Ohio Children of Robert Stoneburner and Margaret Landerman: 501 Emmaline Stoneburner born circa 1843 Morgan County, Ohio married William Augenstein of Marion, Ohio died 1921 at age 64 died after 1921 502 Levi Stoneburner born circa 1845 married Margaret J. ? died March 1915 Danville, Illinois ch: Edwin F., Mary L, Florence B., Frederick E., Robert H., Jessemine Gordon 503 John Marion Stoneburner born 31 Jan. 1847 Morgan County, Ohio married 11 March 1869 Margaret Mohler, Muskingum Co., Ohio died 9 April 1930 Shelby Co., Ill. 504 Phebe E. Stoneburner born circa 1848 Morgan Co., Ohio 505 Lewis Henry Stoneburner born 19 Jan. 1852 Morgan Co., Ohio married 6 April 1875 Isabelle Valentine died 6 April 1920 Shelby County, Ill. No children. 506 George Stoneburner born circa 1853 Morgan Co., Ohio died before 1920 507 Sarah Stoneburner born circa 1855 Morgan Co., Ohio, married 1, Charles E. Austin 1876, married 2, 1898 Laf Tallman died July 1927 Shelby Co., Ill. ch by 1: J.C. Austin, B.E. Austin, Glenn G. Austin. 508...

Genealogy of John Marion Stoneburner

John M., son of Robert and Margaret Landerman Stoneburner, lived in Muskingum County, Ohio after his marriage to Margaret Hannah Mohler on 11 March 1869. She was the daughter of Adam and Caroline Dozer Mohler. Sometime in 1884 the family moved to Shelby County, Illinois. On Monday September 3, 1928, “about 40 members of the Stoneburner families gathered at the home of John M. Stoneburner and wife to enjoy the day. There were five generations present. At the noon hour a bountiful dinner was served on the lawn. All enjoyed a fine time. “Those present were: Elmer Potts and wife; George Rice and wife; Ira McQuinn, wife and son; Mr. Horsely and Harry Pierce and wife, all of Springfield; Guy Hinkle; Lyman Stoneburner and family of Pana; L. O. and Lawrence Stoneburner and their families. All departed at a late hour planning to have more reunions.” John M. and Margaret lived on a farm in Section 28 of Cold Spring Township–an 80 acre tract in 1930. In June of 1929 Margaret left her husband John M. She took legal action restraining him from disposing of any property and filed for separate maintenance. John M. Stoneburner died almost a year later in April, 1930. His obituary read: “John M. Stoneburner, son of Robert and Margaret Stoneburner, was born 31 Jan. 1847 Muskingum Co., Ohio and departed this life April 9, 1930, aged 83 years, 2 months and 9 days. He was married to Maggie Mohler March 11, 1869, and his wife still survives. To this union were born six children namely Leona Potts of Springfield; Hattie E. who departed this...

Genealogy of John Peter Stoneburner

John Peter Stoneburner, fifth child of Johann Peter and Susanna Stoneburner, was born in Virginia before his parents moved to Morgan Co., Ohio. It was probably in Ohio that he married Catherine sometime around 1810. On the 12th of October 1879-john Stoneburner wrote his will. It read: “In the name of the Benevolent Father of all, I, John Stoneburner of the State of Ohio and of the County of Morgan, do make and publish this my Last will and testament Item 1st–I wish my Beloved Wife to remain on the Farm and in the House where we now reside and to have the third of the produce of the whole farm-and one Horse, and one Cow, and all the household and kitchen furniture. During her natural life. Item 2nd–whereas I have paid unto Jonathon and Robert my two sons one hundred and fifty dollars each-and sixty five dollars to Susanna Collins one of my daughters; now it is my will and wish that Sampson my sone shall have fifty acres off of the south side of the Farm before mentioned, in lue of his full share of the real estate for which I this day make him a deed; and he is to pay the thirds of the produce of the same, to me and my wife during our natural lives 3rd–I also wish Margaret, Catherine, and George and Henry my sons and daughters to have one hundred and fifty dollars each–so as to make them equal to the former named sones– 4th–I also wish my daughter Susanna to have eighty five dollars, which she is not to receive...

Genealogy of Johann Peter Stoneburner

Johann Peter, second son of Jacob and Anna Stoneburner, married Susanna Compher? sometime around 1782/85 in Loudoun County, Virginia. They were still living in Virginia in 1810 but near 1813 they had moved to Ohio. In 1820 Peter became one of the first officers of the Evangelical Lutheran Church. Later Peter and Susanna became members of the New Jerusalem Church of Deavertown, Ohio which was in the northwest part of Morgan County. His will was made in Morgan County, Ohio on the 29th day of September 1821. It read: “In the Name of God, Amen: I, Peter Stoneburner of York Township, Morgan County and State of Ohio, farmer; being strong in mind and memory, make this my last will and testament. 1st. I bequeath my soul to God who gave it to me, and my body to the earth to be buried decently in a Christian manner. I bequeath this plantation whereon I live, and the house to my wife Susanna Stoneburner as long as she lives, I also bequeath to her all the household furniture that is in the house, I also bequeath to her one horse and one cow. I bequeath to John Wiley one hundred and sixty acres of land, to be purchased for him out of this estate where on I now live. I appoint my sons Michael Stoneburner and John Stoneburner as my executors. I allow my Executors to purchase the said quarter section of land for John Wiley and give him the deed for it so as soon as he is of the age of twenty one years. My wife Susanna Stoneburner shall...

Genealogy of George Spracklin

George Spracklin, son of Peter Spracklin and Elizabeth Andrews, continued living in Dudley Township, Hardin Co., Ohio. There he met Arloa Turner Minor and was married 9 April 1840, Knox Co., Ohio. In December of 1864 George bought land here in Shelby Co., Illinois in Drypoint Township. He paid $3680 for 200 acres south of Lakewood, Ill; in 1865, he and his family lived in Edwards County, Ill. before moving to Shelby County. By 1868 George owned 300 acres in Shelby County. Arloa, George’s wife, died in July, 1892 and is buried in Red Bank Cemetery, land formerly owned by George Spracklin. By the time George died in 1902, he had parceled out much of the land to his and Arloa’s children. He left an estate of 70 acres of land in Edwards County, Ill.; 70 acres of land in Shelby County, Ill., valued at $3750.00; one house and 6 lots in Lakewood Ill. and $3000 worth of personal property. His cash on hand at death was $617.50 with $1572.18 owed him in loans. On that record Peter J. Spracklin, a resident of Hardin Co., Ohio, 30 Dec. 1902, stated that he had cared for George Spracklin from January 1 to July 1, 1893. Some of his personal or household items were sold on Sept. 25, 1902. These items were: 1 table, 1 bed stead, 1 safe, 1 bureau, 1 stand, 1 rocking chair, 4 chairs, 1 hay knife, 1 looking glass, 1 lamp, 1 blacking brush, 1 watch, 1 brass pad lock, 2 other pad locks, 1 pr. large steel yards, 1 pr. small steel yards, 1 shot gun,...
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