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Genealogies of the First Settlers of Passaic Valley

Passaic Valley in New Jersey was first settled in the early 1700’s, primarily by families from Long Island, New York and Connecticut. The Family records, or, Genealogies of the first settlers of Passaic Valley and vicinity above Chatham provides genealogies of these early settlers from family records when they could be obtained, otherwise the author used family members to provide the information. Since some of the information comes from memory of individuals, one should validate what is written before relying on it to greatly.

Cindy Henderson’s DNA Results

My mother is of Irish/German and Italian ancestry. Her father is a 1st generation Italian, the family is from Abruzzo Italy. The colonial line, her mother who is partially Irish/German was from Roane, TN. Her (grandmother) father’s family is from Old Fort McDowell NC. They moved to the Tennessee area. My father’s maternal line, his mother was Black American and born NJ. Her father (my great grandfather), I don’t know his origins other than he was Black. Her mother (my great grandmother) was born in Washington DC and moved to NJ. My grandmother’s birth was the result of an extramarital affair and the family knows little about her father’s detailed ancestry. My grandmother’s mother’s father (my 2nd great grandfather) has ancestry that goes back to Virginia/Washington DC/New Jersey area. My grandmother’s mother (my great grandmother), her family is from NJ and are known as Black. My father’s paternal line is from Hendersonville NC. His father (my grandfather) was Black via his mother (my great grandmother). She was from north western South Carolina. American Indian via his father (my great grandfather) who was from Hendersonville, NC. I think I shown a picture of him to you, he was adopted before the age of 2, and living with a foster family along with several other children. I don’t know the circumstances behind his adoption. This was back in 1868. He never went to school and was working at the age of 10. My dad’s grandfather (Indian), from what I was told to by my Aunt, his mother (my 2nd great grandmother) has ties to the Eastern Band of Cherokee. His father...

Biography of Abraham Stites

Abraham Stites was a son of Dr. John Stites, and was born in Elizabeth, New Jersey, during the Revolutionary war, and with his mother was removed into a cellar to avoid danger resulting from a sharp engagement then going on between the British soldiers and the rebels of that day. A singular coincidence in the life of Mr. Stites is that he died in February, 1864, in Hopkinsville, during a skirmish here between the Confederate and Federal troops. He, with a large family connection of the Ganos and Stiteses, removed from New Jersey to the Ohio Valley in 1808, carrying their goods on horseback across the mountains to Pittsburgh, and thence by flat-boats to Cincinnati; his father’s family settled near Georgetown, Kentucky. Mr. Stites had been educated for a lawyer, and licensed as such by Chancellor Kent. He commenced practice at Georgetown, and soon after married Miss Ann Johnson, daughter of Col. Henry Johnson, a Revolutionary soldier. In 1818 he removed to Hopkinsville, where he resided until his death. Mr. Stites was a man of fine education, and devoted to belles letters and literary pursuits. He was a good lawyer – an excellent counselor – but seldom, after becoming a county official, made any charge for legal advice. He was the confidant of many of the wealthiest men of the county, but was so opposed to litigation, that on all occasions, when he could do so consistently, he would use his efforts to conciliate rather than draw his friends into the meshes of the law. He was brought up, as it were, in the office of Johnson, the compiler...

Memoirs of Nathaniel Folsom

I will here present to the reader the memoirs of Nathaniel Folsom the oldest of the three brothers who cast their lot in their morning” of life among” the Choctaws, and became the fathers of the Folsom House in the Choctaw Nation, as related by himself to the missionary, Rev. Cyrus Byington, June, 1823, and furnished me by his grand-daughter Czarena Folsom, now Mrs. Rabb. “I was born in North Carolina, Rowan County, May 17th, 1756. My father was born in Massachusetts or Connecticut. My mother was born in New Jersey. My parents moved to Georgia, and there my father sent me to school about six months, during which time I learned to read and write. My mother taught me to read and spell at home. My father had a great desire to go to Mississippi to get money; they said money grew on bushes! We got off and came into the Choctaw Nation. The whole family came; we hired an Indian pilot who led us through the Nation to Pearl River, where we met three of our neighbors who were re turning on account of sickness. This alarmed my father, who then determined to return to North Carolina. We came back into the Nation to Mr. Welch’s, on Bok Tuklo (Two Creeks), the father of Mr. Nail. At this time I was about 19 years of age. At that place we parted. My father knocked “me down”. I arose and told him I would quit him, and did so by walking straight off before his face. I do not remember what I did, but I always thought I...

Biography of Prof. George Bush

George Bush, one of the most eminent Biblical scholars and Orientalists of his time in America, was born in Norwich, Vt., June 12, 1796, a son of John and Abigal (Marvin) Bush, and grandson of Capt. Timothy Bush. The boyhood of George Bush was mostly passed in Hanover, New Hampshire, whither his father removed when he was quite young. The son gave early indications of superior intelligence. His eldest sister says “he had a ravishing love of books from her first remembrance of him.” He frequented the College library at Hanover and would bring home ponderous volumes, almost as large as he could carry. Old residents remember him riding to mill on horseback with his face hidden in the pages of an open book that he held before him. At the age of nineteen he entered Dartmouth College, graduating in 1818 with the valedictory and the highest honors of his class, which was of more than average ability, containing among others such scholars as Professor William Chamberlain of Dartmouth College, and the late Professor Thomas C. Upham of Bowdoin College. During a part of his college course, Mr. Bush was a private tutor in the family of Honorable Mills Olcott, and there probably was formed an intimate friendship between himself and Rufus Choate of the class of 1819. The two young men chummed together during the college course, and Mr. Choate ever after kept a high regard for and estimate of his college friend. After teaching one year in the Orange County Grammar School at Randolph, Vt., Mr. Bush commenced the study of theology at Princeton Seminary, where he...

Moravian Massacre at Gnadenbrutten

In the early part of the year 1763 two Moravian missionaries, Post and Heckewelder, established a mission among the Tuscarawa Indians, and in a few years they had three nourishing missionary stations, viz: Shoenbrun, Gnadenbrutten and Salem, which were about five miles apart and fifty miles west of the present town of Steubenville, Ohio. During our Revolutionary War their position being midway between the hostile Indians (allies of the British) on the Sandusky River, and our frontier settlements, and therefore on the direct route of the war parties of both the British Indian allies and the frontier settlers, they were occasionally forced to give food and shelter to both, which aroused the jealousy of both the Indian allies of the English and the American frontiersmen, although they preserved the strictest neutrality. In February 1772, the American settlers (nothing more could be expected) assumed to believe that the Moravian, or Christian Indians; as they were called, harbored the hostile Indians; therefore they pronounced them enemies, and at once doomed them to destruction. Accordingly on the following march, ninety volunteers, under the leadership of one David Williamson, started for Gnadenbrutten where they arrived on the morning of the 8th, and at once surrounded and entered the station; but found the most of the Indians in a field gathering corn. They told them they had come in peace and friendship, and with a proposition to move them from their unpleasant and dangerous position between the two hostile races to Fort Pitt for their better protection. The unsuspecting Indians, delighted at the suggestion of their removal to a safer place, gave up their few...

News from New England – King Phillip’s War

Being a true and last account of the present Bloody Wars carried on betwixt the infidels, natives, and the English Christians, and converted Indians of New England, declaring the many dreadful battles fought betwixt them: As also the many towns and villages burnt by the merciless heathens. And also the true number of all the Christians slain since the beginning of that War, As it was sent over by a factor of New England to a merchant in London. Licensed Aug. 1. Roger L’Estrange. London. Printed for J. Corners, at the sign of the Black Raven in Duck-Lane, 1676.1 Those Coals of Discention which had a long time lain hid under the ashes of a secret envy; contracted by the Heathen Indians of New England, against the English; and Christian Natives of that Country brake out in June 1675, both Armies being at a distance without doing anything remarkable till the 13 of December following; at which time the Mathusets and Plymouth Company marching from Seconk, sent out a considerable number of Scouts, who killed & took 55 of the Enemy, returning with no other loss but two of our Men disabled; about three days after came a perfidious Indian to our Army pretending he was sent by the Sachems to treat of Peace, who was indeed no other but a Spy and was no sooner conducted out of our Camp but we had news brought us that 22 of our Straggling Soldiers were Slain and divers barns and out houses, with Mr. Jer. Bulls dwelling house burnt by him and his Treacherous confederates which waited for him. The...

Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

Map of Zwaanendael

Nautical chart of Zwaanendael (“Swanendael”) and Godyn’s Bay in New Netherland. Zwaanendael was a patroonship founded by Samuel Godyn, a director of the Dutch West India Company, in 1629. Godyn made his land claim to the West India Company under jurisdiction of the Charter of Freedoms and Exemptions. After a short time, the initial 32 inhabitants were murdered by local Indians and Godyn sold his land back to the West India Company. The West India Company kept the names of the local area, including Godyn’s Bay, which eventually became Delaware Bay. The text in Dutch at left side of the map reads: The nations at the South River are Great Sironese at the Hoerenkil, Sewapois, Remkokes, Small Sironese, Minquaen also named Machaorikyns, Naraticonck, Atsayonck, Mantaes, Rechaweygh, Armewamix, Matikongh, Momakavaongk, Sankikans. These above described nations have friendships with each other. And are mostly one people with one language, with the exception of the Machaoretijns that are named like this because of their language that is Minquaens and is as much similar as with us old Dutch or Wallonian. The life of these people is totally free. Their soothsayers or devil preachers have nothing to say over them, their shamans can’t order them and have no authority to give someone a death penalty. The marriages are not fixed, most have one wife, the chief more than one. And they leave their women easily, and these will go from one to another like a whore, usually women are disowned after having a child and as a result the population remains low. Translation of the tribal names: Sironese – Ciconicine Sewapois – Sewaposees,...

Presbyterian Cemetery Records, Lakehurst, Ocean County, New Jersey

Cemetery transcription for Presbyterian Cemetery in Lakehurst, Ocean County, NJ. BICKERTON Louisa, b. 1829, d. 4 Aug. 1882, ae. 53 yrs. Wife of Charles Bickerton. BICKFORD George A., b. 1 Jan. 1871, d. 20 Mar. 1871, ae. 3 mos., 20 days. Son of N. G. and E. D. Bickford. BOZARTH John G., b. 19 May 1808, d. 21 Oct. 1880, ae. 72 yrs., 5 mos., 2 days. Husband of Susanna P. Bozarth. Susana P., b. 30 Mar. 1819, d. 12 Mar. 1896, ae. 76 yrs., 11 mos., 10 days. Wife of John G. Bozarth. DAGE Catherine E., b. 1866, d. 17 June 1894, ae. 28 yrs. Dau. of Edwin and Hannah Dage. DARR Sallie J., b. 19 Jan. 1884, d. 31 Mar. 1887, ae. 3 yrs., 2 mos., 12 days. DENIKE Mary A., b. 6 Jan. 1805, d. 1 June 1891, ae. 86 yrs., 4 mos., 25 days. Wife of Robert Denike. DENNIS Ann Downs, b. 1821. DEWEIT Harriet, b. June 1830, d. 16 Feb. 1869, ae. 38 yrs., 8 mos. Lucy Emma, b. July 1868, d. 10 Jan. 1869, ae. 6 mos. Dau. of Harriet Deweit. DOWNS William, b. 1820, d. 16 Feb. 1895, ae. 75 yrs. Co. F. 23rd N. J. Vol. EMLEY Mary Norton, b. 26 Apr. 1877, d. 13 Jan. 1890, ae. 22 yrs., 8 mos., 18 days. FORD James L., b. 1810, d. 1887, ae. 77 yrs. Husband of Sarah Weeaste. Sarah Weeaste, b. 1821, d. 1890, ae. 69 yrs. Wife of James L. Ford. GRAY J. V., Co. K. 2nd N. J. Inf. HICKS Wilton C., b. 1860, d. 27 Mar. 1892, ae....
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