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Jackson Family of Fall River, MA

Here in this article it is the purpose to treat of but one branch or family of the Massachusetts Jacksons – the family of John Jackson, who was a descendant of the Middleboro settler of the name, one John Jackson, and who in time removed to the State of Maine, the home State for several generations of the Fall River Jacksons in question. The first John Jackson came from England to New England and settled in Middleboro, where in May, 1714, he was married to Mary Smith. They had two children (if not more), John and Cornelius, the latter of whom was born in Middleboro Sept. 11, 1716. The father died in 1731.

Manchester New Hampshire Directories 1840-1965

19 free digitized directories found online for the city of Manchester New Hampshire covering the years of 1860-1918 (incomplete). Directories can provide such information on an individual such as their employment and address during the year issued. They may also indicate whether they were renting or residing with somebody else at the time.

Bean and Bane Family Genealogy of Saco Valley Maine

Tradition makes the ancestor of this family who first came to our shores a native of the Isle of Jersey, but I doubt the truth of the statement. I have not found the name, or one resembling it, in any record or book relating to Jersey. The surname Bain, and Bane, are derived from the Gaelic word bane which signified white or fair complexion, as Donald Bane, who usurped the Scottish throne after the death of his brother, Malcolm Canmore. An ancient branch of the family in Fifeshire, Scotland, have spelled the surname Bayne. The Highland MacBanes were a branch of the Macintosh clan, and their distinctive badge was the red whortleberry. Maj. Gillies MacBane, chief of the clan in 1745, was a man of giant stature, being six feet four and a half inches in height. He brought a hundred MacBanes into the field, and at the battle of Culloden, being beset by a squad of government troops, he placed his back against a wall, and, though wounded in several places, fought with such desperation that he laid thirteen of his assailants dead at his feet. An officer called to “save that brave man,” but they cut him down. His widow is said to have composed the pathetic lament in Gaelic, entitled mo run geal oig, or. The following lines were found in a work called “The Gael”: “With thy back to the wall, and thy breast to the targe, Full Hashed thy claymore in the face of their charge, The blood of the boldest that barren turf stain. But alas! thine is reddest there, Gillies MacBane! Hewn...

Biographical Sketch of General Lewis S. Partridge

General Lewis S. Partridge, son of Abel and Alpa (Lewis) Partridge, was born in Norwich, Vt., in 1818, a year prolific in the birth of sons in town. In early life he served in clerkships in mercantile business in Norwich, and in Hanover and Claremont, New Hampshire. He became a cadet at Norwich University in 1833, remaining there until 1836. Later on he entered into mercantile business on his own account in his native town. He was at one time proprietor of the “Union Hotel,” at Norwich. From early life Mr. Partridge took an active part in politics and was a prominent factor in his political party, both in town and State. He represented his town in the General Assembly in 1852 and the following year; was Adjutant General of Vermont, 1852-1854; postmaster at Norwich, 1833, 1861, and 1885; delegate to the Democratic National Convention of 1854. He married (first) Harriet Baxter (youngest child of Ira Baxter, of Norwich), June 16, 1846. They had three children. He married (second) Elizabeth Woodruff of Tinmouth, Vermont, and to them were born six children, now living, all of whom and their mother reside at Manchester,┬áNew Hampshire. General Partridge was a man of fine physique and pleasing address. He died at Norwich, May 22,...

Biographical Sketch of Rev. N. R. Nichols

Rev. N. R. Nichols was pastor of the Congregational church at Norwich village from February, 1880, to May, 1904, after completing a seven years’ pastorate at Barnet, Vermont, which was preceded by brief pastorates at Westfield, Massachusetts, and Acworth, New Hampshire. During his term of nearly a quarter of a century here in Norwich, Mr. Nichols faithfully cared for the interests committed to his charge, as the one hundred and ninety-five accessions to his church during his pastorate amply indicate. Not alone to matters connected with his church did he give his attention, but, as well, to those of a temporal character; elevated pleasures, as he viewed them from his conscientious standpoint, were recipients of his countenance and active aid. For many years Mr. Nichols was one of the trustees of the Norwich public library, in which institution he had a deep interest, and at the front entrance to the library building he caused a pretty door to be placed in memory of his deceased wife. It may be appropriate to place at the conclusion of this short sketch of the late pastor a few words from the presentation address accompanying a gift of silver coin to Mr. Nichols on the twenty-fifth anniversary of his marriage: “We love and honor you for the life you have lived among us and for the good you have accomplished.”   Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT...

Loveland Family of Norwich Vermont

One of the farms in Norwich still (1904) owned and occupied by descendants bearing the name of the original settlers, belongs in the Loveland family. Joseph Loveland was born in 1747, in Connecticut; moving from that state to Dartmouth College, Hanover township, New Hampshire, where he enlisted to reinforce the Continental Army at Ticonderoga. In 1778 he settled on a now fertile farm, about a mile and a half from Norwich village, building a home a little off the river road. Ten of his thirteen children were born in town, and six of them made, during most of their lives, their native place their home; dying, with one exception, in the town, at an average age of seventy-two years. Aaron, one of Joseph’s older sons, familiarly known as “The Judge” graduated at Dartmouth in the same class as Daniel Webster, with whom he roomed during part of his college course. Being the best Greek scholar of his class, he had an oration in that language at Commencement. Though a lawyer he lived the life of a recluse; he was ever a conservator of the peace rather than an instigator of litigation. He represented Norwich several times in the legislature, and was Chief Judge of Windsor County court in 1823. He died in 1870, at the advanced age of eighty-nine years. David Loveland, the next younger brother of Aaron, made farming his chief business, at which he worked early and late, with good success. A few years before his death, in 1828, he built a new house on his river farm, about three miles from the village. As his fatherless...

Hutchinson Family of Norwich Vermont

Hutchinson is an old and numerous family in Norwich, as well as in other parts of the country. They were among the early settlers of Massachusetts and were in Lynn and Salem in that colony as early as 1628, or 1629. A descendant of these early colonists, named Abijah, who was a tailor, removed from Salem to Windham early in the eighteenth century. His son Samuel, born about 1719, in company with his son, John, came to Norwich in 1765. They cleared an island in the Connecticut River, opposite the present residency of John W. Loveland, and planted it with corn. In the fall of that year they returned to Connecticut, and in company with a younger son, Samuel, returned in the spring of 1766, and made a permanent settlement. The elder Samuel spent the remainder of his life in the town, and died February 8, 1809. His wife was Jemina Dunham; she died January 12, 1798. Besides the two sons named above, he had three daughters: Sarah, married Francis Smalley; Tabitha, married Jonathan Delano; Jerusha, married Nathan Roberts. They all died young,’ soon after marriage. Hutchinson, John, son of Samuel, was born in 1741, in Windham, Connecticut, and married Mary Wilson, who was born in Ashford, Connecticut, in August, 1744. He enlisted in the Continental Army, and died at Philadelphia, June 22, 1778. His widow afterwards married Solomon Strong. His children were: Jerome Hutchinson, see further; John Hutchinson, who removed to New York State, where he died; Lydia Hutchinson, who was probably the first child born in Norwich, married D. Hammond, of Thetford; Abigail Hutchinson, married Honorable John...

Biography of Reverend Samuel Goddard

Mr. Samuel Goddard was born at Sutton, Massachusetts, July 6, 1772. We have no information concerning his early life. His opportunities for education are said to have been scanty. After coming to manhood he was for several years in trade with a brother in Royalston, Mass. Here he married his first wife (Abigail Goddard of Athol, a town adjoining Royalston), and here his older children were born.

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