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Biography of Hon. Richard P. Bland

HON. RICHARD P. BLAND. From poverty and obscurity all the eminent men of the West have fought their way in the battle of life, and by their own persistence and perseverance have attained to prominence and honor. They have given permanency to every enterprise that they have honored with their patronage and have stamped upon them their own individuality. The subject of this sketch is a man well known to the people of Missouri, and needs no eulogy from the pen of the biographer, for his deeds are his monuments and will endure long after he has moldered into dust. He was born near Hartford, Ohio County, Kentucky, August 19, 1836. His parents Stouton E. and Margaret (Nall) Bland, both of whom were born on Blue Grass soil. The family originally came from Virginia, but emigrated to Kentucky in the time of Daniel Boone, and were among the early settlers of that country. The father devoted his life to the occupation of farming, and at the age of thirty-five, when just in the prime of life, was called upon to pay the last debt of nature, his widow surviving him several years. Of the four children born to them three are now living: Richard P.; Charles C., who is judge of the Eighteenth Judicial Circuit of Missouri, and Elizabeth, wife of Frederick Tutley, of St. Francois County, Missouri. Young Richard P. received his initiatory training in the public schools in the vicinity of his rural home, and afterward finished his education in Griffin’s Academy. In 1855 he left the home of his childhood and took up his residence in...

Biography of David M. James

DAVID M. JAMES. There are few features of business enterprise which contribute a larger quota to the convenience of the residential and transient public than the well-appointed livery stable, and a valuable acquisition to the town of West Plains, Missouri, is the establishment of this kind owned and conducted by David M. James. This gentleman owes his nativity to Henry County, Kentucky, where he was born in 1833, a son of Dr. Beverly W. and Matilda (Day) James, natives of the old State of Virginia and Kentucky, respectively. When a young man Dr. James removed to Kentucky and was there married to Mary Eubank, who died soon after, and after this event he moved to Kentucky, where he eventually married Miss Matilda Day. He was a man of more than ordinary intellectual ability and learning, and as a physician was very successful and well liked. Prior to the birth of the subject of this sketch he lived for a time in Bloomington, Indiana, where he taught school, but afterward returned to Kentucky and lived in several different counties. He at one time edited a paper in Newcastle, Kentucky, and then one in Charlestown, Indiana, and was for some years associate judge of the Charlestown, (Indiana) Circuit Court. He was a strong Union man during the war, but took no part in the struggle; was a Democrat in politics and socially was a member of the A. F. & A. M. He died at Jeffersonville, Indiana, in 1879, at the ripe old age of eighty-eight years, having long been a worthy member of the Christian Church. His father, Thomas James,...

Pueblo Indians

Pueblo Indians. A general name for those Indians in the Southwest who dwelt in stone buildings as opposed to the tribes living in more fragile shelters, pueblo being the word for “town” or “village” in Spanish. It is not a tribal or even a stock name, since the Pueblos belonged to four distinct stocks. Following is the classification of Pueblos made by F. W. Hodge (1910) except that the Kiowa have since been connected with the Tanoans and a few minor changes have been introduced,

Washo Indians

Washo Indians. On Truckee River as far down as the Meadows, though their right to the latter was disputed by the Northern Paiute tribes; Carson River down to the first large canyon below Carson City; the borders of Lake Tahoe; and Sierra and other valleys as far as the first range south of Honey Lake, Calififornia

Northern Paiute Indians

Northern Paiute. The Northern Paiute were not properly a tribe, the name being used for a dialectic division as indicated above. They covered western Nevada, southeastern Oregon, and a strip of California east of the Sierra Nevada as far south as Owens Lake except for territory occupied by the Washo. According to the students of the area, they were pushed out of Powder River Valley and the upper course of John Day River in the nineteenth century by Shahaptian tribes and the Cayuse.

Biography of Thomas T. Redsull

Great, indeed, have been the changes that time and man have wrought since Thomas T. Redsull landed on the Pacific coast. California yet belonged to Mexico, and much of the land, especially in the southern part of the state, was divided into large estates, owned and occupied by Spanish families. Mr. Redsull was then but eleven years of age, yet had started out to make his own way in the world. He was born in the County of Kent, England, on the 15th of November, 1827, a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Goymer) Redsull, both of whom were natives of England and representatives of ancient families of that country. They were both members of the Episcopal Church, and the father was a collector of excise for the government. He departed this life in 1858, at the age of fifty years, and his widow is now living at the age of one hundred and three years. They had seven children, but only three are now living. Mr. Redsull of this review acquired his early education in England, and when only eleven years of age was bound out as an apprentice to the Hudson’s Bay Company, and in their service came to the United States in 1838, landing in California. He is consequently one of the oldest pioneers of that state. The same year he also went to Oregon, and therefore can claim the honor of being a pioneer of that state, too. He made his home at Vancouver and was for twenty years a pilot on the Columbia River at Multnomah. On Multnomah island, May 4, 1854, Mr. Redsull was...

Biography of Richard Z. Johnson

Perhaps there is no part of this history of more general interest than the record of the bar. It is well known that the peace, prosperity and well-being of every community depend upon the wise interpretation of the laws, as well as upon their judicious framing, and there-fore the records of the various persons who have at various times made up the bar will form an important part of this work. A well known jurist of Illinois said, “In the American state the great and good lawyer must always be prominent, for he is one of the forces that move and control society. Public confidence has generally been reposed in the legal profession. It has ever been the defender of popular rights, the champion of freedom regulated by law, the firm support of good government. In the times of danger it has stood like a rock and breasted the mad passions of the hour and finally resisted tumult and faction. No political preferment, no mere place, can add to the power or increase the honor which belongs to the pure and educated lawyer. Richard Z. Johnson, of Boise, is one who has been honored by and is an honor to the legal fraternity of Idaho. He stands today prominent among the leading members of the bar of the state, a position which he has attained through marked ability. A native of Akron, Ohio, he was born May 21, 1837, and is descended from ancestors who were early settlers of New England. On both the paternal and maternal sides representatives of the families were found among the “minute men” who...

Biography of J. D. C. Thiessen

One of the best known and most successful sheep-raisers and wool-growers of Idaho is J. D. C. Thiessen, of Lewiston. A native of Holstein, Germany, he was born February 16, 1843, and is of Danish ancestry, although his parents, John D. and Alary (Hanchild) Thiessen, were both natives of Germany. The father was a farmer and trader. In religious faith both he and his wife were Lutherans, and the former lived to be fifty-four years of age, while the mother departed this life in her fifty-sixth year. Mr. Thiessen of this review is the fourth in their family of seven children. He was educated in his native land, and when twenty-three years of age emigrated to the United States, reaching New York in 1866. Two years later he came to San Francisco, where he pursued a course in a commercial school and was thus fitted for life’s practical duties. He did not come to this country entirely empty-handed, as so many have done, having had five hundred dollars on his arrival. He was however, ignorant of the English language, and had to meet other difficulties. After having spent several years in America, he received three thousand dollars from his father’s estate, but lost it in mining enterprises in California and Nevada, and when he arrived in Lewiston, November 10, 1876, he had just eighteen and one-half dollars remaining. Here he entered the employ of John Brearley, but soon afterward the Indian war broke out, and he engaged in packing army supplies for the government, receiving eighty-five dollars per month and his rations. In the spring of 1878 he established...

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