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Nevada WW2 NMCG Casualty List – M Surnames

MAU, David L., Pfc., USMC. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. William F. Mau, 1156 High St., Ely. McCLURE, Charles W., Pfc., USMCR. Mother, Mrs. Beverly M. Roberson, 449 15th St., Sparks. McCOMBS, James T., Cpl., USMC. Friend, Mr. Jack Travis, Montello. MILLICK, Arnold R., Pfc., USMC. Father, Mr. Richard A. Millick, Box 1215, Ely. (Wife, Mrs. Arnold R. Millick, Wellington, N. Z.) MOELL, John Penn, Seaman 2c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Christian Moell, 573 6th St., Elko. MORICONI, Antonio Martino, Seaman 1c, USNR. Mother, Mrs. Katie D’Andrea, Box 525, Yerington. MYERS, William John, Ship’s Cook 1c, USN. Wife, Mrs. Betty Jane Myers, Box 786,...

Nevada WW2 NMCG Casualty List – C Surnames

CHAVEZ, Leland, Seaman 1c, USNR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Deloy Chavez, Rt. 2, Box 72, Reno. CONNORS, Jack, Gunnery Sgt., USMCR. Parents, Mr. and Mrs. Rodney S. Connors, Box 325-8, Hawthorne. CREEL, Marshall Stevens, Lieutenant, USNR. Father, Mr. Cecil W. Creel, 1331 Hillside Dr.,...

Biographical Sketch of James T. Hatfield

Three and one-half miles northeast from Owyhee is found the comfortable and valuable farm and home of the subject of this article. The estate is one of eighty acres of fine land, all covered by the Owyhee ditch and well cultivated and productive of abundant returns of hay, fruit and other valuable crops. Mr. Hatfield is one of the originators of the Owyhee ditch, and he labored faithfully on it from the time it was started until it was finished. Reverting to his personal history we note that James T. was born in Adair County, Missouri, on July 14, 1839, being the son of Andrew and Mary Hatfield. He removed with his parents while still a child to Putnam County, in the same state, and there remained with them until the time of his marriage, which happy event occurred on September 9, 1858. Miss Lucinda Sumpter then becoming his wife. In September, 1861 Mr. Hatfield enlisted in the Confederate Army under Price and participated in the battle of Lexington serving three months. Then he returned home and being convinced of the error of the cause of Confederacy, he did what few men would have the courage to do, that was own his mistake and offer his services on the right side. He enlisted in Company F. Ninth Missouri Volunteers and served in this capacity until the fall of 1863, being then honorably discharged. It was in the spring of 1863 that he joined a train of emigrants bound for the west with ox teams. Sixty-five wagons and on hundred and thirteen emigrants formed the train, and notwithstanding several attacks...

Biography of Thomas Howard

This substantial and capable gentleman is one of the real builders of the county of Harney, and it is quite proper that he should be accorded representation in its history, being a man greatly respected and worthy of the high esteem given to him. He was born in the city of New York, on May 11, 1833, being the son of Patrick H. and Mary (Ford) Howard. The father was an engineer, operating a stationary engine. Thomas grew to manhood, gaining a good education meanwhile, and part of the time working in the markets, where he learned the butcher trade. In the memorable ‘forty-nine he was one of the gold seekers, going from New York on a steamer to Panama and thence to San Francisco on a sailing vessel. The trip was hot and tedious, being two months from Panama to the Golden Gate. He mined for a time and then went at his trade in Marysville and other places in the state. It was in 1859 that he went to Carson and Virginia Cities, Nevada, and there operated at his trade, and also wrought in Esmeraldo. In the spring of 1862 Mr. Howard was hired at a wage of one hundred dollars per month to accompany a herd of cattle belonging to Job Dye to Florence, Idaho. The water around Harney lake being so high that it was impossible to make headway, they were turned aside, not knowing the route they were taking, and came where Canyon City now stands. They discovered the first gold on the creek and their band of cattle were the first cattle that...

Mattie, the Daughter of Chief Shenkah

Chief Shenka was a Paiute Indian like the first Chief Winnemucca, whom the white men, who early traveled over the Rocky Mountains, met on the broad prairie land of Nevada. He was one of Winnemucca’s young followers. Of noble appearance and always brave and trustworthy, Shenkah became the chief of a small tribe of the Paiute, after Winnemucca’s death. When the Piute were at peace with other Indians and with the white people, Shenkah was very friendly indeed, especially to the soldiers, and our officers were much pleased when they could, on marches in search of lakes and rivers round their camps and posts, get Shenkah for a guide. He hunted deer and other game for them and they gave him a rifle and trusted him to make long journeys into the mountains. He always returned, and never without different kinds of wild game. After his old chief went far away to California with General Fremont, trouble arose on account of a sad mistake which resulted in a dreadful war between some of the Soldiers and the Indians. Chief Shenkah, leading his warriors, was in that war from the beginning to the end, until, at last, a good peace came. His daughter, Mattie, when about twenty years of age, told me about her father. Mattie could read and write English slowly, and spoke it well enough for me to understand her. She talked with a pretty musical tone, each sentence sounding sometimes like a song, and sometimes her sentences were like poetry. This is what she said: “My first memory is way back. It is like a shadow, a...

Winnemucca, Chief of the Paiute

Like the great Montezuma of old Mexico, Chief Winnemucca, who was born and lived the most of his life beside Pyramid Lake, Nevada, had a thinking mind and a large, warm heart. He was chief of an Indian nation called the Paiute and before any white men came over the Rocky Mountains to disturb them, there were several thousand Indians, to whom he was like a father. He saw to it that they had plenty of good food to eat, nice furs and skins to wear, and handsome tepees (or wigwams) for their families to live in. He had a good wife and many children of his own; he was always very kind to them, and took much pains to teach all he himself knew to his eldest son, who was to be Chief Winnemucca after him. Seventy years ago the Piute were a peace loving and contented people. They knew how to gather in the swift antelopes from the plains, how to catch the deer and ensnare the wild turkeys, and help themselves to all the game of the mountains round about their broad valley and clear lake in which they caught splendid speckled trout and other choice fish. The Piute never appeared to be as shrewd and smart as the Snake Indians, and they were not warlike; yet with their bows and arrows they did drive off the thieves that came from their Indian neighbors, sometimes, to hunt in the mountains or fish in the lake. Chief Winnemucca taught the Piute very different lessons from other Indian chiefs; for example, to love peace and make constant effort...

Toc-me-to-ne, an Indian Princess

We called her Sarah Winnemucca, but her real name was Toe-me-to-ne, which means shell-flower. Have you ever seen these flowers growing in an old garden among their many cousins of the Mint family? Well, Toe-me-to-ne loved them of all flowers best, for was she not herself a shell-flower. Her people were Paiute Indians, and they lived in every part of what is now the great State of Nevada. Toc-me-to-ne had a flower name, so she was allowed to take part in the children’s flower festival, when. all the little girls dance and sing, holding hands and making believe that they are the very flowers for which they are named. They wear their own flowers, too, and after they have sung together for a while one will dance off on the grass by herself while all the boys and girls look on and she sings I am a daisy gold and white, Somebody catch me-me! The grown-up people watch, too, as their children play, and Toe-me-to-ne was never happier than when, light as a bird, she danced and sang her shell-flower song: See me! see me, a beautiful flower. Give me a hand and dance. Then after the plays and dancing the children had all sorts of good things to eat, and the flower festival was over for a year. Only three times did Toe-me-to-ne take part in the flower festival, for when she was quite a little girl her grandfather, Chief Winnemucca, took his family and went to live in California, and when they came back she was almost grown up. Her grandfather was very fond of her, and...

Biography of James S. Hudson

JAMES S. HUDSON. This gentleman is one of the substantial residents of Newton County, Arkansas, and is also one of the pioneers of the same, for he has resided here since his birth, which occurred on February 4, 1857. His uncle, Samuel Hudson, was the first white settler of the county, having come to this region in 1830, and his brother, Andrew Hudson, the father of James S., came here in 1835 from his native county of Jackson,Tennessee, where he was born in 1818. He settled on a farm about three miles west of where Jasper now is on Little Buffalo Creek, and so dense was the cane along that bottom that he was compelled to get out and cut a road through it. He lived on this farm for some years, but later moved to a farm one mile west of Jasper, on which his son William now resides, and where he died in the fall of 1891. He was quite successful in the accumulation of worldly goods, and was a substantial, law-abiding and public-spirited citizen. In his political views he always supported the principles of Democracy and at one time ably filled the office of county treasurer. Wild game was abundant when he first came to this section, and he and his brother Samuel became well known as hunters, for many were the deer and bears that fell victims to their unerring marksmanship. Mr. Hudson was married to Miss Sarah Holt, a native of Tennessee, who survived him about one year, having become the mother of the following children: Nancy, married I.J. Dum and died in California;...

Biography of Barnett P. Parrish

BARNETT P. PARRISH. Although almost eighty years have passed over the head of the gentleman who is the subject of this sketch, he is well preserved, physically and mentally, and is a typical representative of the native Ohioan, honest and upright in word and deed, energetic and pushing, and of a decidedly practical turn of mind. He was born in the Buckeye State September 13, 1818, and is a son of Ira O. W. W. and Ruth (Cheneworth) Parrish. It is thought that the father was a Virginian by birth, but at an early date he was married in Ohio and, when our subject was but seven or eight years of age, he and family removed to Vermillion County, Indiana, and in 1835 to Illinois. Later they left that State and settled in the woods of Polk County, Missouri, improved a farm, and there passed the remainder of their lives, Mr. Parrish dying a number of years after the war, when eighty-three years of age. He was a well-to-do farmer and hotel man, and was a soldier in the War of 1812. He was of Irish descent. His wife died before the war. They were the parents of nine children: William Thomas, who died when a boy; Barnett P., the subject of this sketch; Casandria, deceased, who was the wife of Calvin Gaylor; Joseph, a soldier of the Mexican War, and also a soldier of the Confederate Army under Gen. Price, was killed while at home in Taney County; Meredith, resided in Arkansas when last heard from, was a federal soldier under Gen. John A. Logan; John, a farmer...
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