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Margaret and David Mitchell: Fourth Generation

William Bradford Laughead 211. Laughead, William Bradford (43) ; b. May 24, 1838; was a student at Westminster College, New Wilmington, Pa. Enlisted in the Union Army in the summer of 1862; died of fever near Lexington, Ky., Nov. 28, 1862. Nancy Laughead-Young 212. Laughead-Young, Nancy (43), Pasadena, Cal.; b. 1842. m. Nov. 21, 1867, James H. Young. Resided until recently in Washington, Iowa; is now in California. United Presbyterian. David Laughead 213. Laughead, David (43) ; b. May, 1816. Died March, 1863. James Henry Laughead 214. Laughead, James Henry (43), Washington, Iowa; b. April 11, 1848. m. Feb. 20, 1873, Maria, dau. of John and Adaline McCleery. Farmer; United Presbyterians; Republican and Prohibition. Leander Laughead 215. Laughead, Leander (43) ; b. about 1861. m. Feb., 1873, Iona Effie Holcomb. In 1885, they were living in Washington, Iowa. Children : I. Ethel (died in infancy) II. 545 Edie or Edward. William Laughead 217. Laughead, William (44). Not living. Had two sons. Elder Laughead 218. Laughead, Elder (44). Died in early manhood. Charles Laughead 219. Laughead, Charles (44). Died in California. Sarah Laughead 219a. Laughead, Sarah (44). Died in early life. Joana Alice Laughead 220. Laughead, Joana Alice (44). Resides in Cleveland, Ohio. Elizabeth Laughead 221. Laughead, Elizabeth (44). In 1885 was residing in Xenia and connected with the Xenia Gazette. John Laughead 221a. Laughead, John (44), Xenia, Ohio. Mary Elizabeth Laughead-Harper 222. Laughead-Harper, Mary Elizabeth (46) ; b. April, 1837. m. John S. Harper. Children: I. 861a. Isaac Newton Laughead 223. Laughead, Isaac Newton (45), R. D. L, Palestine, Ill.; b. Aug. 13, 1843, near Xenia, O. m. Margaret...

Margaret and David Mitchell: Third Generation

Issac Newton Laughead 43. Laughead, Isaac Newton (?) ; b. near Clark’s run, Greene Co., Ohio, Nov. 12, 1810. m. 183’x, Nancy, dau. of David and Nancy Anderson, of Greene Co., O. He was the first of David Mitchell’s descendants to enter the ministry. He graduated at Franklin College, Athens, O., in 1834 ; was licensed by the Miami Associate Presbytery on July 10, 1838, to preach the gospel. He supplied, at the direction of his presbytery, various congregations, but spent the greater part of his life in and near Washington, Iowa. He wrote a booklet in 1885, relating to the Laughead family from which we have largely quoted. Died about 1888. Children: I. 211 William B.; II. 212 Nancy; III. 213 David; IV. 214 James H.; V. 215 Leander. David Laughead 44. Laughead, David (7); b. about 1813. m. a Miss Winter, who died; no child. m. 1850 a Miss Elder, from Logan Co., O., who died 1866. m. Jane Ritchie. He died in 1898. Children: I. 217 William ; II. 218 Elder; III. 219 Charles; IV. 219a Sarah; V. 220 Alice; VI. 221 Lizzie; VII. 221a John. Joseph Kyle Laughead 45. Laughead, Joseph Kyle (7); b. about 1815. m. about 1841, Catherine, dau. of George Galloway. He died in 1883, and she in 1884. Lived east of Xenia. Farmers ; United Presbyterians ; Republicans. Children:- I. 222 Elizabeth; II. 223 Isaac N.; III. 224 George G. James Laughead 46. Laughead, James (‘Y) ; m. Rebecca Galloway, dau. of George Galloway. His widow was living in 1885. One child, dying in infancy. William Chambers Laughead 47. Laughead, William...

David and Margaret Mitchell: Second Generation

James Laughead 6. Laughead, James (1) ; born 1787 in Kentucky, married in Ohio, Mrs. Anna Morton, a widow, and lived most of his life in Logan Co., O., where he died at a good old age; His remains lie in a graveyard near Huntsville of that County. No children. 7. Laughead, David Mitchell (1); born Feb. 7, 1789, married Elizabeth, daughter of Joseph Kyle, who was neighbor to his father’s family in Kentucky, and moved north in 1804, or shortly afterward. Seceder ; farmer ; abolitionist ; was in the war of 1812. Children: I. 43 Isaac N.; II. 44 David; III. 45 Joseph K.; IV. 46 James; V. 47 William C.; VI. 48 Samuel; VII. 49 Thomas S.; VIII. 50 Henry;. William Laughead 8. Laughead, William (1) b. about 1 , 92 ; m. Sept. 20, 1820, Martha dau. of Robert and Elizabeth (McCorkle) Jackson, who had moved from Pennsylvania to Ohio with parents. The latter came first, to Jefferson County in 1799, and then to. Clark’s run, O., in 1814, for the purpose of seeking better church privileges and a better farm. Mr. Laughead shortly after his marriage moved to Logan Co., O. His wife died in 1834 and is buried near Huntsville. In 1868, he, with his family moved to Norwood, Mercer Co., Ill., where he died, Dec. 15, 1872. Seceders, United Presbyterians. he was an elder in the U. P. church. Farmer. Children: I. 56 Elizabeth; II. 57 Emaline ; III. 58 Martha, IV. 59 Lucilla ; V. 60 Robert J.; VI. 61 David; VII. 62 Margaret J. Elenora Laughead-Gillespie 9. Laughead-Gillespie, Elenora (1)...

David and Margaret Mitchell, First Generation

The Children of David and Margaret Mitchell Elizabeth (Mitchell) Laughead 1. Elizabeth (Mitchell) Laughead. Born the last part of the year 1763, in Cumberland County, Pa., not many miles southwesterly from Carlisle. She was baptised by Rev. John Cuthbertson, Feb. 20, 1764 ; moved to Kentucky with parents in 1779, and, with them in the fort, shared the hardships of the early pioneers. About the year 1786, she married David, son of James and Eleanor (McKnight) Laughead, who were married by Rev. John Cuthbertson, Dec. 12, 1752, at Octarara, Pa. and who, about 1784, moved to Fayette Co., Ky. It is said of James, that he served in the raid against the Ohio Indians in 1780. If so, he must have gone from Pa., as they had not yet moved to Ky. There were Laugheads in the Monongehela Congregation at Yough, Pa., in 1779. The McKnights into whose family James married were part of a large connection, living in Lancaster Co., and were prominent Covenanters. From Reb. I. N. Laughead’s booklet, we quote as follows: “As far as I can track back our name through the generations that are passed, I find our fathers and mothers associated with the strictest orders of the Presbyterian family. Our immediate forefathers were a mixture of Covenanter and Seceder origin (Reformed and Associate Presbyterian). Our name is Scotch-Irish. About the year 1650, King Charles L, of England, being at war with his parliament, was defeated in Scotland and delivered into the hands of the English parliament, was tried, condemned and beheaded. His son, Prince Charles (afterwards Charles IL) fled the country. Oliver Cromwell,...

Biography of William Mann

William Mann was born in Hancock, Washington county, Maryland, April 1, 1839. He is the son of Jonathan E. and Mary A. Mann, who came to Missouri in 1841 and settled at Gallatin, where the subject of this sketch was reared. His educational advantages were limited, only having the opportunity of attending school two or three months each year from the time he was eight until fifteen years of age. His mother died when he was nine, and his father just before he became of age. His father being a merchant, young Mann started for himself in the same calling, he and his brother, Elwood E., and Jonathan Brosins, forming the firm of Brosins, Mann & Co., in 1860, soon after his father’s death. They engaged in business until the disturbed condition of the county, caused by the war, compelled them to discontinue, which they did in 1863. Our subject then went to Nebraska City and engaged in the stove and tinware business, which he carried on until 1867, when, peace being restored, he sold out and returned to Gallatin, and in 1868 again engaged in the mercantile business, associating with him Thomas J. Crain as Mann & Crain. They dissolved in 1870, and in 1871 he became connected in the mercantile business with another brother, J. A. Mann, under the firm name of Mann & Brother. His brother retiring from the firm in 1873, John D. Coulson became his successor, changing the firm to Mann & Coulson, and under this name they continued until 1877, when Mr. Coulson retired; Mr. Mann remained only a year longer, when he...

Biography of Thomas J. Crain

Thomas J. Crain was born near the Ohio river, in Fleming county, Kentucky, September 4, 1830. He was reared and educated in his native place, and continued to reside there until 1855, when he migrated to Missouri and entered land in Holt county, improving the same and living upon it until 1864, in February of which year he rented his farm and went to Nebraska City, Nebraska. Here he was engaged in freighting to Denver, Colorado, for one year, when he opened a feeding stable, and carried on that business until the spring of 1866, then went to Hamburg, Iowa, and engaged in stock-feeding for one year. Returning to Gallatin in the spring of 1867, he engaged in the mercantile business with William Mann, under the name and style of Mann &. Crain, and transacted business until the fall of 1869, when they dissolved partnership and closed out business. He next engaged in the lumber trade, being the pioneer lumber dealer of Gallatin, and there being no railroad at that time, he had the lumber hauled by team from Hamilton, in Caldwell county. In 1871 he retired from the lumber trade and engaged in the grocery business with S. T. Hill, under the firm name of Hill & Crain, until 1875. We find him buying and shipping walnut lumber to Chicago in 1878, and he continued to buy and ship until 1880, when he entered into partnership with A. F. Barnett, forming the present firm of Crain & Barnett, lumber dealers. Mr. Crain was married to Miss Amanda M. Plumer, of Fleming county, Kentucky, on the 25th of January,...

Biographical Sketch of Horatio E. Needham

Horatio E. Needham is a native of Addison County, Vermont, born September 10, 1827, near the village of Shalott. While in his infancy his, parents migrated to St. Lawrence County, New York, remained six years, and then went to Cuyahoga County, Ohio, where they remained until 1852. During this time Horatio was employed on the farm and also at stone-cutting. In 1859 he went to Fremont County, Iowa, and in 1862 enlisted in Company E, Twenty-ninth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and was on duty three years, being in many important engagements, among which were the battles, of Little Rock, Helena, Mobile and Saline River, and his soldier life was extended through the States of Missouri, Kentucky, Mississippi, Louisiana,, Alabama, Arkansas, Texas and Iowa, until he was honorably discharged in 1865. After his return to Fremont County he was engaged in teaming for two years before his removal to Nebraska, where he took up a section of land which he afterward sold and came to Daviess County in 1875. He now owns and cultivates a fine farm in Sheridan Township. Mr. Needham was married, November 25, 1852, to Miss Lucina Bagley, a native of Ohio. Eight children have been born to them, five of whom are living: Whitfield H., Mary I., Ada A., Minnie E. and Willie...

Treaty of March 6, 1865

Articles of treaty made and concluded at Washington, D. C., on the sixth day of March, A. D. 1865, between the United of America, by their commissioners, Clark W. Thompson, Robert W. Furnas, and the Omaha tribe of Indians by their chiefs, E-sta-mah-za, or Joseph La Flesche, Gra-ta-mah-zhe, or Standing Hawk; Ga-he-ga-zhinga, or Little Chief; Tah-wah-gah-ha, or Village Maker; Wah-no-ke-ga, or Noise; Sha-da-na-ge, or Yellow Smoke; Wastch-com-ma-nu, or Hard Walker; Pad-a-ga-he, or Fire Chief; Ta-su, or White Cow; Ma-ha-nin-ga, or No Knife. Article 1.The Omaha tribe of Indians do hereby cede, sell, and convey to the United States a tract of land from the north side of their present reservation, defined and bounded as follows, viz: commencing at a point on the Missouri River four miles due south from the north boundary line of said reservation, thence west ten miles, thence south four miles, thence west to the western boundary line of the reservation, thence north to the northern boundary line, thence east to the Missouri River, and thence south along the river to the place of beginning; and that the said Omaha tribe of Indians will vacate and give possession of the lands ceded by this treaty immediately after its ratification: Provided, That nothing herein contained shall be construed to include any of the lands upon which the said Omaha tribe of Indians have now improvements, or any land or improvements belonging to, connected with, or used for the benefit of the Missouri school now in existence upon the Omaha reservation. Article 2.In consideration of the foregoing cession, the United States agree to pay to the said Omaha...

Treaty of February 18, 1861

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at Fort Wise, in the Territory of Kansas, on the eighteenth day of February, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, by and between Albert G. Boone and F. B. Culver, commissioners on the part of the United States, and the following named chiefs and delegates, representing the confederated tribes of Arapahoe and Cheyenne Indians of the Upper Arkansas River, viz: Little Raven, Storm, Shave-Head, and Big-Mouth, (on the part of the Arapahoes), and Black Kettle, White Antelope, Lean Bear, Little Wolf, and Left Hand, or Namos (on the part of the Cheyennes), they being thereto duly authorized by said confederated tribes of Indians. Article 1.. The said chiefs and delegates of said Arapahoe and Cheyenne tribes of Indians do hereby cede and relinquish to the United States all lands now owned, possessed, or claimed by them, wherever situated, except a tract to be reserved for the use of said tribes located within the following described boundaries, to wit: Beginning at the mouth of the Sandy Fork of the Arkansas River and extending westwardly along the said river to the mouth of Purgatory River; thence along up the west bank of the Purgatory River to the northern boundary of the Territory of New Mexico; thence west along said boundary to a point where a line drawn due south from a point on the Arkansas River, five miles east of the mouth of the Huerfano River, would intersect said northern boundary of New Mexico; thence due north from that point on said boundary of the Sandy Fork...
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