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The Illinois Indians – Indian Wars

Some years ago there was deposited in the Archives of the “Historical Society” of Chicago a record in reference to the history of the Illinois Indians, a portion of which is interesting as connected with this matter. It was deposited by Judge Caton, who became a citizen of Chicago thirty-nine years ago, when the whole country was occupied as the hunting grounds of the Pottowattomie tribe. Their chief, Shabboni, died in 1849, the only remnant of this once powerful tribe. Of him it could be truth-fully said he was the last of his race. Comparatively not long since the surrounding country was mainly occupied by the Illinois tribe, an important people, ranging from the Wabash River to the Mississippi, and from the Ohio to Lake Superior. They lived mostly in Northern Illinois, centering in La Salle County. Then near Utica stood the largest town ever constructed by Northern Indians, and their great cemeteries attest the extent of the populous hordes of Indians who roamed the forests and prairies at will. La Salle, the Pioneer, discovered them before the great Iroquois Confederation had reached them, after their battle-fields had strewn their victims all along from the Atlantic Coast to the Wabash and from the lakes, and even north of them to the Alleghanies and the Ohio. The Iroquois or Six Nations, with a great slaughter, defeated this hitherto invincible people, laid waste their great city, and scattered them in broken bands over their wide domain. They never recovered from this blow. For a century they struggled, but were finally exterminated by the Pottowattomies and Ottawas at Starved Rock, on the Illinois...

Terrible Massacre At Natchez

The colony of Louisiana was now in a flourishing condition; its fields were cultivated by more than two thousand Negroes; cotton, indigo, tobacco and grain were produced; skins and furs of all descriptions were obtained in a traffic with the Indians; and lumber was extensively exported to the West India islands. The province was protected by eight hundred troops of the line; but the bloody massacre of the French population of Fort Rosalie, at the Natchez, arrested these rapid strides of prosperity, and shrouded all things in sadness and gloom. Our library contains many accounts of this horrible affair, which harmonize very well with each other; but in reference to the causes which led to it, more particularly, we propose to introduce the statement of Le Page Du Pratz, who was residing in Louisiana at the time.

1850 Lawrence County, Mississippi Census

The 1850 census of Lawrence County, MS was extracted by Dennis Partridge in 2011. The extraction provides basic information such as the names, ages, sex, and occupation of each resident of the county. For space purposes and speed, I have chosen not to do a complete extraction, but may choose at a later date to add the full transcription. Every person enumerated in Lawrence County, however, is listed. For further verification of this census, researchers should view the original census records. For purposes of search, I have taken the liberty of adding the surname of each person. In the actual record, only the first person of each families surname per page was listed, while the remaining individuals of that family name were listed as ” for their surname. An extraction of a census is very much a work of art. The handwriting of Jonathan Keegan left many of the names indistinguishable, and often he spelled the name as it sounded, instead of as it actually occurred for the person in the records of the town, and in their family history. I have taken the liberty in my extraction of providing positive identity of each person enumerated – by this I mean I have used my knowledge of the residents of Lawrence County, MS at that time to identify each person, and used their proper spelling. LastGiveIAgeSCOccupation$State BowenWilliamH56mwMerchant2000NC BowenElizaK50fwSC BowenJohnB23mwGun Smith50SC BowenJacquesB21mwGun SmithSC BowenJamesL14mwSC BowenAG C12mwSC BowenHenryP9mwSC HurstWmW24mwShoemakerSC HurstHenrietta16fwSC HurstFrances18fwSC HurstElizaK1fwSC HurstThomasT19mwPrinterSC HurstSidneyB10mwSC WalkerT?50mwShoemakerMA StrongSamuel52mwFarmerNC StrongMary48fwNC StrongJohn22mwNC StrongJames21mwNC StrongMartha19fwNC StrongSamuelJr.18mwNC StrongME11fwNC StrongThomas7mwNC ElmoreSamuel5mwNC ElmoreMF3fwMS BattonHowe41mwFarmerNC BattonNancy33fwMS BattonRebecca10fwMS BattonIsabella9fwMS BattonNancyI6fwMS BattonHowell4mwMS BattonJohnC2mwMS KnappCarey51mwFarmer160KY KnappLucy53fwGA KnappWillis19mwMS KnappMartha17fwMS KnappThomas15mwMS KnappFanny13fwMS KnappWmC8mwMS WalkerH?38mwFarmerSC WalkerElizabeth34fwTN...

Unknown Tribes of Indian Bands, Gens and Clans

Many tribes have sub-tribes, bands, gens, clans and phratry.  Often very little information is known or they no longer exist.  We have included them here to provide more information about the tribes. We have listed these bands by location as we can not find any other connection to tribes. Mississippi Amicoa. Mentioned by Coxe (Carolana, 14, 1741) as a tribe on the Honabanou, an imaginary river entering the Mississippi from the west, 15 leagues above the mouth of the Ohio. It is probably an imaginary tribe. Amilcou. Mentioned by Iberville in connection with the Biloxi, Moctobi, Huma, Paskagula, etc., as a small tribe North of the lower Mississippi in 1699 (Margry, Dec., iv, 155, 1880); not identified. Nevada Agaihtikara (fish-eaters). A division of the Paviotso living in 1866 in the vicinity of Walker River and lake and Carson River and lake, Nevada. They were under Chief Oderie and numbered about 1,500. North Carolina Akawenchaka  A small band that formerly lived in North Carolina, now numbering about 20 individuals, incorporated with the Tuscarora in New York. They are not regarded as true Tuscarora. Hewitt, Onondaga MS., B. A. E., 1888. Texas Acubadaos. A tribe known to Cabeza de Vaca (Smith transl., 84, 1851) during his sojourn in Texas, 1527-34, as living “in the rear” of or more inland than the Atayos (Adai). The region indicated would seem to be Caddoan country. Andacaminos (Span.: wanderers, probably referring to their roving character). One of the tribes of west Texas, some at least of whose people were neophytes of the mission of San Jose y San Miguel de Aguayo. Texas State Archives, Nov.,...

Mississippi Genealogy at Ancestry

Ancestry is the largest provider of genealogy data online. The billions of records they provide have advanced genealogy online beyond imagination just a decade ago. The following is but a small sample of what they provide for Mississippi genealogy at Ancestry. While some of these databases are free, many require a subscription. You can try a 14 day free trial and see if you can find any of your Mississippi genealogy at Ancestry! Mississippi Genealogy Databases – Subscription May be Required Ancestry Free Trial Statewide Genealogy Alabama and Mississippi Connections Early Settlers of Alabama First settlers of the Mississippi Territory : grants taken from the American state papers, class VIII, Public lands, volume I, History of Alabama : and incidentally of Georgia and Mississippi, from the earliest period Inventory of the church and synagogue archives of Mississippi. Land Claims in Mississippi Territory, 1789-1834 Mississippi Census, 1805-90 Mississippi Court Records Index, 1799-1835 Mississippi Court Records, 1799-1835 Mississippi History, 1925 Mississippi Marriages to 1825 Mississippi Marriages, 1776-1935 Mississippi Marriages, 1826-1900 Mississippi Marriages, 1826-50 Mississippi, Homestead and Cash Entry Patents, Pre-1908 Mississippi, Naturalization Records, 1908-1991 Mississippi, State and Territorial Census Collection, 1792-1866 Spanish and British Land Grants in Mississippi Territory, 1750-1784 Web: Mississippi, Find A Grave Index, 1798-2012 Mississippi Military Data at Ancestry A view of the Vicksburg campaign : a paper read before the Madison Literary Club, October 14, 1907 Mississippi Territory in the War of 1812 Mississippi, Compiled Service Records of Volunteer Soldiers, 1812-1815 Miscellaneous Mississippi data at Ancestry A narrative of the life of James Pearse : in two parts … containing a general account of his early life, and more particularl Memoirs...

Biography of Cyrus Harris

Biographical Sketch Of Cyrus Harris, Ex-Governor Of The Chickasaw Nation. Cyrus Harris, who was of the House Emisha taluyah (pro. E, we, mish-ar, beyond, ta-larn-yah, putting it down) was born, as he stated to me, three, miles south of Pontotoc, Mississippi, on the 22nd of August 1817. He died at his home on Mill Creek, Chickasaw Nation. He lived with his mother until the year 1827, when he was sent to school at the Monroe Missionary Station, at the time that Rev. Thomas C. Stuart, that noble Christian missionary and Presbyterian minister, had charge of the school, and in which many Chickasaw youths, both male and female, were being- educated. In 1828, he was taken, to the state of Tennessee by Mr. Hugh Wilson, a minister also of the Old School Presbyterian faith and order, and placed in an Indian school located on a small stream called Roberson Fork, in the county of Giles. This humble little Indian school was taught by a man named William R. McNight. Cyrus, at the close of the year 1829, had only been taught the rudiments of an English education, to spell in the spelling-book and read in the New Testament. In the early part of the year 1830, he took up the study of geography and reading in the first and second readers, which terminated his school boy days, as he returned home that year and never attended school again. When he returned to his home he found it vacated; but learned that his mother had moved to a place near a little lake then known as Ishtpufahaiyip (pro. Isht-poon-fah, Horn, haiyip,...

The Chickasaw Nation

The Chickasaws, although at the period of a small nation, were once numerous, and their language was spoken by many tribes in the Western States. They were the fiercest, most insolent, haughty and cruel people among the Southern Indians. They had proved their bravery and intrepidity in constant wars. In 1541, they attacked the camp of De Soto in a most furious midnight assault, threw his army into dismay, killed some of his soldiers, destroyed all his baggage, and burnt up the town in which he was quartered. In 1736, they whipped the French under Bienville, who had invaded their country, and forced them to retreat to Mobile. In 1753, MM. Bevist and Regio encountered defeat at their hands. They continually attacked the boats of the French voyagers upon the Mississippi and Tennessee. They were constantly at war with the Kickapoos and other tribes upon the Ohio, but were defeated in most of these engagements. But, with the English as their allies, they were eminently successful against the Choctaws and Creeks, with whom they were often at variance. The Chickasaws were great robbers, and, like the Creeks, often invaded a country, killing the inhabitants and carrying off slaves and plunder. The men considered the cultivation of the earth beneath them; and, when not engaged in hunting or warfare, slept away their time or played upon flutes, while their women were at work. They were athletic, well formed and graceful. The women were cleanly, industrious, and generally good-looking. In 1771, they lived in the centre of a large and gently rolling prairie, three miles square. They obtained their water from holes, which...

The Migration of Alabama and Muscogee Indians East

It has been seen that the Indians living in that part of Alabama through which De Soto passed, were the Coosas, inhabiting the territory embraced in the present counties of Benton, Talladega, Coosa, and a portion of Cherokee; the Tallases, living upon the Tallapoosa and its tributary streams; the Mobilians extending from near the present city of Montgomery to the commercial emporium which now bears their name; the Pafallayas or Choctaws, inhabiting the territory of the modern counties of Green, Marengo, Tuscaloosa, Sumpter and Pickens; and, in the present State of Mississippi, the Chickasaws, in the valley of the Yalobusha; and the Alabamas, upon the Yazoo. 1541 April: It will, also, be recollected, that this remarkable Spaniard overrun the rich province of Chiaha, the territory of the present northwestern Georgia, and that he there found the Chalaques, which all writers upon aboriginal history decide to be the original name of the Cherokees. The invasion of De Soto resulted in the destruction of an immense Indian population, in all the territory through which he passed, except that of Georgia, where he fought no battles. The European diseases, which the natives inherited from the Spaniards, served, also, to thin their population. Again, the constant bloody wars in which they were engaged afterwards, among each other, still further reduced their numbers. And while the bloody Spaniards were wandering over this beautiful country, the Muscogees were living upon the Ohio.1 They heard of the desolation of Alabama, and after a long time came to occupy and re-people it. The remarkable migration of this powerful tribe, and that of the Alabamas, will now, for...

The Indians of Alabama, Florida, Georgia and Mississippi

The Indians of Alabama, Florida, Georgia and Mississippi were so similar in form, mode of living and general habits, in the time of De Soto and of others who succeeded him in penetrating these wilds, that they will all be treated, on the pages of this chapter, as one people. The color was like that of the Indians of our day. The males were admirably proportioned, athletic, active and graceful in their movements, and possessed open and manly countenances. The females, not inferior in form, were smaller, and many of them beautiful. No ugly or ill-formed Indians were seen, except at the town of Tula, west of the Mississippi. Corpulence was rare; nevertheless, it was excessive in a few instances. In the neighborhood of Apalache, in Florida, the Chief was so fat that he was compelled to move about his house upon his hands and knees. The dress of the men consisted of a mantle of the size of a common blanket, made of the inner bark of trees, and a species of flax, interwoven. It was thrown over the shoulders, with the right arm exposed. One of these mantles encircled the body of the female, commencing below the breast and extending nearly to the knees, while another was gracefully thrown over the shoulders, also with the right arm exposed. Upon the St. John’s river, the females, although equally advanced in civilization, appeared in a much greater state of nudity–often with no covering in summer, except a moss drapery suspended round the waist, and which hung down in graceful negligence. Both sexes there were, however, adorned with ornaments, consisting...
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